Journalism

  • Most Topular Stories

  • The problem with “takes” is the business model of mass media

    BuzzMachine
    Jeff Jarvis
    4 Sep 2014 | 6:59 am
    A very good take on why all news organizations think they “need a take on that” becomes a self-fulfilling prophecy, being followed by another take and then another take on the Awl’s take on takes. Shoot us all now. No, shoot the business model and the presumptions of mass media economics. That is what is causing this ridiculous treadmill of making content for content’s sake to get audience for audience’s sake with any original reporting or original thinking being copied and copied again and again until it looks like a the fuzzy, unreadable, 87th Xerox copy of a…
  • Stories I'd like to see

    Columbia Journalism Review
    16 Sep 2014 | 8:55 am
    1. What's the matter with Andrew Cuomo? By now I assume New Yorker editor David Remnick has assigned someone to do a profile of New York Governor Andrew Cuomo, who is fast becoming the Howard Hughes of big-time politicians. But just in case he hasn't, here's a reminder for him or any other smart editor why it's time to take...
  • Technoeuropanic

    BuzzMachine
    Jeff Jarvis
    4 Sep 2014 | 6:23 pm
    Europe is at it again. Or still. I’m told that a consortium of European publishers will run an ad in European papers this weekend attacking Google and the EU’s antitrust deal with the company. It’s the same old stuff: publishers whining and stomping their feet that it’s just not fair that Google is doing better than they are and government should step in to do something about this, this damned, uh … competitor. In the ad, the publishers’ argument is that Google’s search is not “impartial.” First, who said it has to be? Second, Google does…
  • "The Sorority House Of Hillary Clinton": How A Fox Guest Explains Away The War On Women

    Media Matters for America - Latest Items
    16 Sep 2014 | 8:04 am
    From the September 16 edition of Fox News' Fox & Friends:Previously:  10 Times Fox Host Brian Kilmeade Degraded Women On Air "How Convenient": Fox Host Dismisses Democrats' Concern Over Ray Rice Tape As "War On Women" Ploy Why The GOP's Attempt To Rebrand On Women's Issues Is Doomed
  • Real-World Development

    Open
    By DANIELLE ROTHERMEL
    3 Sep 2014 | 8:02 am
    The New York Times continued our technology internship program this summer, and Danielle Rothermel, one of the interns in this year’s class, discusses what she learned. I’ve spent my summer learning new languages, platforms and frameworks, but before I get into that, let me share some background about myself. After a frustrating and failed attempt to learn how to use the command prompt in middle school, I went into my freshman year of college adamant that I would take my required Introduction to Programming class and be done with computer science forever. However, I soon found out…
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    Columbia Journalism Review

  • Stories I'd like to see

    16 Sep 2014 | 8:55 am
    1. What's the matter with Andrew Cuomo? By now I assume New Yorker editor David Remnick has assigned someone to do a profile of New York Governor Andrew Cuomo, who is fast becoming the Howard Hughes of big-time politicians. But just in case he hasn't, here's a reminder for him or any other smart editor why it's time to take...
  • The Reporters Committee is about to start suing people to help journalists

    16 Sep 2014 | 4:50 am
    Fair warning, all ye who interfere with newsgathering: The Reporters Committee for Freedom of the Press is getting ready to sue you. The organization has hired its first litigation director, Katie Townsend, to bring lawsuits around the country in cases that affect access to information for the press and public. Although the RCFP has provided legal assistance to journalists for...
  • A fancy word for 'custom'

    15 Sep 2014 | 12:50 pm
    An article labeled as news fawned last week over the new Jaguar XE, which was introduced in London in a manner fit for James Bond, dangling from helicopter and crossing the Thames on a speedboat. Repeating the company's press materials almost verbatim, the article said the "fine-grain leathers and details such as contrasting twin-needle stitching give the cabin a bespoke...
  • How a Nebraska newspaper kicked off a major prison sentencing scandal

    15 Sep 2014 | 9:00 am
    PRAIRIE VILLAGE, KS — “Had the World-Herald not broken the story, nothing would have happened.” So said Nebraska state Sen. Ernie Chambers at a dramatic Sept. 4 hearing on a scandal that has rocked the state’s Department of Corrections, spurred litigation and criminal investigations against state officials, become a political football in the governor’s race, and disrupted the lives of...
  • On media freedom, United Nations plays by its own rules

    15 Sep 2014 | 4:45 am
    From Ukraine to Syria to Gaza, a relentless summer of international strife is raising the stakes for the United Nations on the eve of its General Assembly session this week. In a rare move, President Barack Obama is personally chairing the Security Council to build support against terrorist groups like ISIS, all but guaranteeing the media spotlight and underscoring the...
 
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    BuzzMachine

  • Technoeuropanic

    Jeff Jarvis
    4 Sep 2014 | 6:23 pm
    Europe is at it again. Or still. I’m told that a consortium of European publishers will run an ad in European papers this weekend attacking Google and the EU’s antitrust deal with the company. It’s the same old stuff: publishers whining and stomping their feet that it’s just not fair that Google is doing better than they are and government should step in to do something about this, this damned, uh … competitor. In the ad, the publishers’ argument is that Google’s search is not “impartial.” First, who said it has to be? Second, Google does…
  • The problem with “takes” is the business model of mass media

    Jeff Jarvis
    4 Sep 2014 | 6:59 am
    A very good take on why all news organizations think they “need a take on that” becomes a self-fulfilling prophecy, being followed by another take and then another take on the Awl’s take on takes. Shoot us all now. No, shoot the business model and the presumptions of mass media economics. That is what is causing this ridiculous treadmill of making content for content’s sake to get audience for audience’s sake with any original reporting or original thinking being copied and copied again and again until it looks like a the fuzzy, unreadable, 87th Xerox copy of a…
  • What could social journalism do for Ferguson?

    Jeff Jarvis
    16 Aug 2014 | 9:37 am
    It took too long, but finally the attention of American journalism turned to Ferguson. Is the crush and focus of network cameras and big-paper reporters helping Ferguson or exploiting its struggle? The answer to that is obvious; see, for example, Newtown. The better, more constructive question is: How could journalism help the residents of Ferguson? The rationale behind our new, proposed M.A. in Social Journalism at CUNY — the thinking behind my argument that journalism must see itself as a service — is that journalism should start by listening, not speaking. It should start with…
  • What society are we building here?

    Jeff Jarvis
    14 Aug 2014 | 5:35 pm
    There is no single solution to the plague of trolls, abusers, harassers, lunatics, imposters, and assholes online any more than there is on earth: no one algorithm, no one company rule, no one regulation will do it all, though they can help. The most powerful weapon in any case is our own norms as a society. What exactly are our norms online? And what are we — you, yes you, and I — doing to establish and enforce our standards as an online society? Anything? Twitter, Facebook, and other platforms bear responsibility. But so do we all. I cannot imagine any civilized being who is not…
  • Unoriginal sin

    Jeff Jarvis
    14 Aug 2014 | 9:42 am
    The amazing Ethan Zuckerman argues at eloquent length in The Atlantic that advertising was the web’s original sin, which really is just a corollary to the contention that giving away content for free on the web (and supporting it with advertising) was newspapers’ and magazines’ original sin. I’m going to disagree. What bothers Ethan, I think, is not advertising but mass media economics — which, I will agree, do not fit on the net. And the solution that preachers against this sin bless — consumer payment — brings with it a host of unintended and…
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    Media Matters for America - Latest Items

  • "The Sorority House Of Hillary Clinton": How A Fox Guest Explains Away The War On Women

    16 Sep 2014 | 8:04 am
    From the September 16 edition of Fox News' Fox & Friends:Previously:  10 Times Fox Host Brian Kilmeade Degraded Women On Air "How Convenient": Fox Host Dismisses Democrats' Concern Over Ray Rice Tape As "War On Women" Ploy Why The GOP's Attempt To Rebrand On Women's Issues Is Doomed
  • From Tragedy To Farce: How Fox News And The GOP Tarnished Benghazi

    16 Sep 2014 | 5:46 am
    On September 6, Republican Congressman Lynn Westmoreland spoke at a Cobb County Republican breakfast in Georgia to an audience of 75 people, who each paid $10 to attend his "update on the Benghazi investigation."  Westmoreland is one of seven Republican members picked to serve on the House select committee, which holds its first public hearing tomorrow and could stretch its inquiries into the 2016 election year. The latest Republican-run body follows what has been a parade of costly and repetitive investigations into the Benghazi terror attack that killed four…
  • All Questions Answered , Media Matters ' Guide To The Benghazi Select Committee

    16 Sep 2014 | 5:41 am
    With the House Select Committee on Benghazi scheduled to convene for its first public hearing tomorrow, Media Matters is unveiling All Questions Answered, the definitive user's guide to the committee that demonstrates how conservative inquiries into the 2012 attacks have been litigated over and over again. You can read All Questions Answered at BenghaziHoax.com, a new Media Matters website featuring our latest research and curating nearly 1,000 pieces we have produced over the past two years chronicling and debunking the lies right-wing media have pushed about…
  • REPORT: Fox's Benghazi Obsession By The Numbers

    16 Sep 2014 | 5:33 am
    Fox News' evening lineup ran nearly 1,100 segments on the Benghazi attacks and their aftermath in the first 20 months following the attacks. Nearly 500 segments focused on a set of Obama administration talking points used in September 2012 interviews; more than 100 linked the attacks to a potential Hillary Clinton 2016 presidential run; and dozens of segments compared the attacks and the administration response to the Watergate or Iran-Contra scandals. The network hosted Republican members of Congress to discuss Benghazi nearly 30 times more…
  • Megyn Kelly Gets Facts Wrong About Coalition Against Islamic State

    16 Sep 2014 | 5:26 am
    Fox News' Megyn Kelly ignored the pledge of military assistance from allied countries to aid the United States in its fight against the Islamic State (IS) when she claimed that "no one is committing to help us." But just one hour earlier, Kelly's colleague Bill O'Reilly explained the commitments made by several countries to address the threat.  On the September 15 edition of Fox News' The Kelly File, host Megyn Kelly discussed recent airstrikes on the Islamic State by the United States, noting that Fox White House correspondent Ed…
 
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    Open

  • Real-World Development

    By DANIELLE ROTHERMEL
    3 Sep 2014 | 8:02 am
    The New York Times continued our technology internship program this summer, and Danielle Rothermel, one of the interns in this year’s class, discusses what she learned. I’ve spent my summer learning new languages, platforms and frameworks, but before I get into that, let me share some background about myself. After a frustrating and failed attempt to learn how to use the command prompt in middle school, I went into my freshman year of college adamant that I would take my required Introduction to Programming class and be done with computer science forever. However, I soon found out…
  • Getting Groovy With Reactive Android

    By MOHIT PANDEY
    18 Aug 2014 | 11:16 am
    “Slow,” a word no one ever wants to see associated with their app. Delay and lag of as little as 100–200 milliseconds will be perceived by users as poor, slow performance. Keeping long running tasks on the main thread will result in that perception, the dreaded “Application Not Responding” (ANR) and a bad user experience. This leaves us developers one choice: concurrent execution of code. The recent growth in popularity of functional programming is well deserved. As things become more asynchronous, the functional model really fits well. Being able to sequence, chain and transform…
  • Build an Open Source Community Platform With New York Times, Washington Post and Mozilla

    By GREG BARBER
    7 Aug 2014 | 12:18 pm
    Each year, Knight-Mozilla OpenNews selects developers, technologists, civic hackers and data crunchers to spend 10 months working as fellows embedded in their partner newsrooms. Fellowships are paid positions, and emphasize open source development that strengthens specific newsrooms and the larger journalism-code community. The search for the 2015 Knight-Mozilla Fellows is now open, and the deadline for applications is Aug. 16, 2014. Staffers from The New York Times, Mozilla OpenNews and The Washington Post are seeking two fellows to join their community platform collaboration. This is their…
  • EMR Streaming in Go

    By JP ROBINSON
    10 Jul 2014 | 8:38 am
    On our platform teams, we use Amazon’s Elastic MapReduce (EMR) service to help us gather useful metrics from log files. We have processes that capture log files, then compress and push them to Amazon S3 for archiving. This pattern builds up massive amounts of information going back several years and, thanks to EMR, it’s all available to us for data crunching. Initially, we used Python for a lot of the heavy lifting, but over time we came to rely on Go. In the Beginning When we first started using EMR, my team wrote the mapper and reducer scripts in Python. We chose Python because it…
  • Improving Article Accessibility

    By CLINT FISHER
    24 Jun 2014 | 8:38 am
    With the redesign and replatform of NYTimes.com in January, we introduced many new features on our article pages. Unfortunately, for our users with disabilities who rely on assistive technology, the new features hindered usability. Before the article redesign, most of our assistive technology users went to our print preview version, which contained only the article text, to avoid having their screen readers interrupted by content outside of the flow of the article. By removing the print preview feature (the redesign allowed us to leverage the print capabilities of modern browsers to improve…
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    The Linchpen

  • Running for ONA board re-election

    Greg Linch
    8 Sep 2014 | 5:00 am
    It’s almost time for the ONA14 conference (yeah!) and that means another board election approaches. My first term on the board is almost complete and I’m running for re-election. It’s been an honor to serve on the board with such a wonderful and talented group of journalists. ONA continues to make great progress and I’d love to continue serving the members and the organization. If you’re a member (or not yet a member, you should join) — I’d greatly appreciate your vote. Here are some highlights from my candidate page. I also want to know what…
  • Block Chains for News

    Greg Linch
    17 Jul 2014 | 10:04 pm
    Anil Dash’s piece on applying an underlying concept of Bitcoin to track digital art has me thinking about the potential applications of  block chains for news. As he writes: What the technology behind Bitcoin enables, in short, is the ability to track online trading of a digital object, without relying on any one central authority, by using the block chain as the ledger of transactions. What if we built a block chain system for news? Recording and verifying facts, data, updates, quotes, people, etc like the Bitcoin protocol tracks transactions in a database that no one owns, but of…
  • Jorge Luis Borges on “the task of art”

    Greg Linch
    20 Apr 2014 | 2:21 pm
    “The task of art is to transform what is continuously happening to us, to transform all these things into symbols, into music, into something that can last in man’s memory. That is our duty. If we don’t fulfill it, we feel unhappy. A writer or any artist has the joyful duty to transform all that into symbols. These symbols could be colors, forms or sounds. For a poet, the symbols are sounds and also words, fables, stories, poetry. The work of a poet never ends. It has nothing to do with working hours. You are continuously receiving things from the external world. These must…
  • Of aquariums and arcades: John Cage and Walter Benjamin

    Greg Linch
    19 Mar 2014 | 10:26 pm
    An interesting remark in the preface to avant-garde composer John Cage’s 1969 book, Notations: A precedent for the absence of information which characterizes this book is the contemporary aquarium (no longer a dark hallway with each species in its own illuminated tank separated from the others and named in Latin): a large glass house with all the fish in it swimming as in an ocean. This aquarium metaphor immediately reminded me of another work: Walter Benjamin‘s Arcades Project. Both represent examples of literary montage — collections where the author’s primary…
  • Seinfeld’s “nothing” and John Cage’s “silence”

    Greg Linch
    11 Mar 2014 | 9:20 pm
    Seinfeld called itself a “show about nothing.” The following video (via Lauren Rabaino) captures this cleverly by compiling moments of “nothing.” As I watched, the stark “nothingess” compressed together in such a literal way reminded me of John Cage‘s concept of “silence.” The experimental composer’s piece 4’33” is generally referred to as his “silent” piece. But, like Seinfeld, it is — despite its label — not silent at all. For Cage, it’s about the shifting the focus from the performer to…
 
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    Mediashift

  • E-Books & Self-Publishing Roundup, September 16, 2014

    Julie Keck
    16 Sep 2014 | 7:59 am
    1. Authors United may not want to admit it, but most books are consumer goods like any other (Mathew Ingram / GigaOm) 2. EU court rules libraries can make e-books without publisher permission (Mike Kozlowski / Good e-Reader) 3. Getting the facts right on publishers and e-books (Jeremy Greenfield / Digital Book World) 4. Self-hosting your author website: Why and how to do it (Jane Friedman) 5. HarperCollins adds digital watermarks to e-books (Publishers Weekly)     Get our newsletters delivered straight to your inbox.
  • Daily Must Reads, September 16, 2014

    Julie Keck
    16 Sep 2014 | 7:53 am
    1. FCC looks to upgrade IT as net neutrality comments clog system (Alex Howard / TechRepublic) 2. Can print and online content just get along? California Sunday Magazine hopes so. (Kara Swisher / Re/code) 3. n+1: Learning that print and digital can peacefully coexist (Caroline O’Donovan / Nieman Lab) 4. Dish adds Food Network, HGTV and other Scripps cable nets to Internet TV lineup (Todd Spangler / Variety) 5. Like it or not, native advertising is squarely inside the big news tent (Joshua Benton / Nieman Lab)   Get our newsletters delivered straight to your inbox.
  • Buying Fake Twitter Followers Will Leave You Tweeting to Mannequins

    Julie Keck
    16 Sep 2014 | 3:05 am
    It’s hard starting a Twitter account from scratch. Not only do you not know who to follow (start with @LouisCK and @PBSMediaShift, then work outward from there), but it seems almost impossible to get people to follow you. And how can you develop your personal brand / spread your beliefs /  be on the cutting edge of your field  / meet Ashton Kutcher if you don’t get a respectable Twitter following under your belt? The sad truth for the attention-deficit-disorder crowd is that if you’re actually trying to build a solid fan base with which to start a movement, or an audience to whom you…
  • #EdShift Chat: Getting Started on Social Media

    Meagan Doll
    16 Sep 2014 | 3:00 am
    On Friday, September 19, our #EdShift chat will focus on the power of social media. Join us at 1 pm Eastern Time/12 pm Central Time/10 am Pacific Time as we learn how to get journalists and students up and running effectively on social. The chat will be moderated as usual by MediaShift’s Education Curator Katy Culver, with special guests Mindy McAdams from the University of Flordia, Sue Robinson from the University of Wisconsin-Madison, Mike Reilley from DePaul University and PBS MediaShift’s Social Media Editor Julie Keck. A Storify of the chat will be added to this page after the…
  • Daily Must Reads, September 15, 2014

    Julie Keck
    15 Sep 2014 | 7:46 am
    1. Netflix launches in France to hostile reception (David Chazan / The Telegraph) 2. In latest volley against Amazon, Hachette’s writers target its board (David Streitfeld / New York Times) 3. There’s a new $23 million venture fund for government startups (Amy Schatz / Re/code) 4. How AOL has quietly become a digital video powerhouse (Eric Blattberg / Digiday) 5. Chinese city creates cell phone lane for texting pedestrians (Adario Strange / Mashable) 6. Ditching Twitter (Erin Kissane)   Get our newsletters delivered straight to your inbox.
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    Technology

  • The strange world of online suicide forums

    Jamie Bartlett
    10 Sep 2014 | 4:09 am
    In a case that had been slowly making its way up the American courts, William Melchert-Dinkel has been convicted of assisting the suicide of a British man, Mark Drybrough, and a Canadian woman, Nadia Kajouji, in an online chat room. Melchert-Dinkel – a male, middle-aged nurse – had been posing as a friendly young woman [...]
  • Unfortunately for Apple, when you're on top there's only one way to go…

    Chris Owen
    10 Sep 2014 | 12:16 am
    The launch of Apple’s latest assault on the public wallet, (as well as its attempt at replacing it, with Apple Pay), was – as expected – a much discussed affair; albeit not necessarily for the right reasons. The terrible live streaming experienced by those wanting to watch live didn’t get things off to a flying [...]
  • For the lulz: the Apple iCloud scandal, 4chan, and why hackers hack

    Jamie Bartlett
    2 Sep 2014 | 11:00 pm
    The most infamous hacker of the Eighties and Nineties was an American man called Kevin Mitnik. Among other things, he compromised the computer systems of giants including Pacific Bell, Nokia, and Sun Microsystems. He did it, he said, for the intellectual challenge, “the seduction of adventure”. Why do hackers hack? This week, dozens of celebrities [...]
  • Why does the internet hate women so much?

    Willard Foxton
    2 Sep 2014 | 7:29 am
    Over the last few days, intimate pictures of hundreds of female celebrities have been stolen from file storage "in the cloud". Some of these pictures have since been published online. While some have suggested a breach in Apple’s iCloud storage, the truth is probably more grubby than that. Computer security experts that I’ve spoken to [...]
  • How solar-powered windows could change the world

    Chris Owen
    27 Aug 2014 | 3:40 am
    The term "game-changing" is a cliché, especially in technology and innovation circles, but the latest developments from Michigan State University have the potential to completely overhaul a multitude of commercial and industrial markets. The university has announced the creation of transparent solar panels – effectively windows that do the same job as the carbuncular, shiny [...]
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    Idea Lab

  • Vermont Helps Shape New Era of the Library

    Nate Herzog
    16 Sep 2014 | 3:00 am
    What’s the purpose of the library? It’s an interesting question when you consider it. In a day and age when information is not only prevalent but personalized, making even the once-common encyclopedia collection irrelevant, what role do libraries play in their communities today? It’s a question many librarians are tackling aggressively. IT’S ABOUT BOOKS, RIGHT? The institution of the public library became popular in the United States in the late 1880s when philanthropists — most notably Andrew Carnegie — started building libraries in cooperation with local…
  • Journalists, Media Startups Converge at Matter’s Third Demo Day

    Aaron Mendelson
    15 Sep 2014 | 3:00 am
    This story originally appeared on the Knight Foundation’s Knight Blog. Matter Three Demo Day from Matter Ventures. Journalists, media makers and tech investors gathered under the high ceilings of a former brass foundry on Thursday for the third demo day from Matter, the San Francisco-based media accelerator. Six startups received five months of financial support, mentorship and a space to refine their visions as part of the accelerator. The event Thursday was a mix between “a graduation ceremony, an investor plan and a real show,” said PRX CEO Jake Shapiro. PRX is one of Matter’s…
  • Knight News Challenge: How Can Libraries Innovate?

    Desiree Everts
    10 Sep 2014 | 3:00 am
    As more and more libraries embrace the digital age, they’re becoming not just a place to consume books, but also creative hubs for information exchange within a community. “I don’t go to libraries to read books anymore,” a friend sheepishly admitted to me recently. “I drink a cup of coffee and mess around on the Internet for a while. I go there to get away from home and just talk and hang out with people.” My friend isn’t alone in his sentiments. During its previous News Challenge on strengthening the Internet, the Knight Foundation found that the role that libraries play in…
  • Localizing the NYT Data Visualization on Race Gap for Police in NC

    Ryan Thornburg
    9 Sep 2014 | 3:00 am
    This post originally appeared on The Future of News. One of the most important attributes of data driven journalism is that it scales, and the primary goal of my OpenRural, Open N.C. and data dashboard projects has been to democratize data so that we start seeing the same types of reporting and presentation in small community papers that we see in the big national news sites. So when I saw Thursday’s New York Times graphic on the race gap in America’s police departments, I immediately thought that something similar could be done pretty quickly that would look at North Carolina…
  • How FrontlineSMS, SFCG Nigeria Created a Conflict Early Warning System for Nigerians

    Valerie Oliphant
    5 Sep 2014 | 3:20 am
    After successfully using FrontlineSMS in the Tomorrow is a New Day (TND) project to monitor and improve radio dramas in the Niger Delta, SFCG Nigeria chose to use the platform in a completely different capacity in Jos, a city in Northern Nigeria. SFCG Nigeria is part of Search for Common Ground, one of the first and largest conflict resolution-focused NGOs. In Northern Nigeria, SFCG partnered with Community Action for Popular Participation (CAPP) to develop an Early Warning System (EWS) funded by the US Institute for Peace (USIP). SMS and emails have been used to spread rumors and…
 
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    Daniel Sato

  • #edtech Links of the Week – 09.05.14

    Daniel Sato
    5 Sep 2014 | 7:53 am
    Learning, Technology, and Faculty Time Joshua Kim, Director of Digital Learning Initiatives at the Dartmouth Center for the Advancement of Learning, talks about the where the real potential for integrating technology into the classroom lies. …technology in the small face-to-face seminar will only be of marginal assistance. The promise of learning technology is to help make large enrollment classes feel like small enrollment classes, and to enable geographically dispersed students to act and feel like face-to-face residential learners. Kim writes that the most important resource an…
  • Using Time Machine to back up an external drive

    Daniel Sato
    26 Aug 2014 | 8:02 pm
    Whether you are working with thousands of photos, hours of video or semesters of lesson plans, securing and backing up your data remains critically important. If you have all of your data stored on the hard drive in your computer, this can be as easy as plugging in an external drive and setting up Time Machine (on a Mac). More likely, if you work with a lot of photos and video like I do, you have most of your data on an external drive. In an ideal world, you would back these up using some sort of Network Attached Storage RAID array. Coming from a newspaper environment, I know this isn’t…
  • Journalist turned academic technology evangelist

    Daniel Sato
    25 Aug 2014 | 7:31 pm
    Earlier in the week, I looked back on my time in journalism. Today, I am looking ahead to the opportunities and challenges that await me in academia. For the past seven years, I have moved from state to state (and sometimes country to country) telling stories through the lens of my camera. Last Monday, I began my new role as multimedia specialist in the Academic Technology department at Rowan University School of Osteopathic Medicine. While the two positions seem unrelated initially, as a digital first journalist, I have been providing my own form of technology support for reporters and…
  • Creating an automated yearbook using InDesign and Excel

    Daniel Sato
    24 Aug 2014 | 10:15 pm
    Last Monday, I began my new job as a multimedia specialist at Rowan University’s School of Osteopathic Medicine. One of the benefits of coming in to a new job is that you see get to look at the various tasks being done with fresh eyes. One such area was in the yearbooks that media services makes for each incoming class. Early on, class sizes were small, and it was possible to lay out each yearbook one by one in Microsoft Word. However, with the 2018 class growing beyond 150 students, formatting each student’s photo, name, degree, university, specialty and hobbies quickly became…
  • Nobody needs another “Why I left journalism” post …

    Daniel Sato
    24 Aug 2014 | 1:21 pm
    A week ago Friday, I had my last day at The News Journal. Walking out of the newsroom for the last time after four years was definitely strange, but I know that they will continue to do the kind of work that helps to shape public opinion and public policy. In the past four years, I’ve had the privilege to cover crime in Wilmington, the University of Delaware women’s basketball team as they progressed through the NCAA tournament, the 2013 inauguration of President Barack Obama and the passage of marriage equality in the state. I’ve also been able to follow stories as the…
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    Reflections of a Newsosaur

  • Why do Sunday newspapers cost so much?

    Newsosaur
    10 Sep 2014 | 5:00 am
    As I picked up the Sunday New York Times at a Starbucks in a leafy neighborhood in Chicago, the twenty-something woman behind the counter started to ring up $2.99, the going rate for the Sunday Chicago Tribune.“Actually,” I said, “it’s $6.”“It is?” she said incredulously.“Yeah,” said the youthful male colleague beside her. “Why would anyone spend that kind of money for a newspaper?” “Well, the
  • Get ready for mobile payments

    Newsosaur
    8 Sep 2014 | 5:00 am
    Although wide-screen iPhones and curvy iWatches have gained the most attention as the buzz builds around Apple’s product announcement on Tuesday, the biggest game changer of all may be the company’s effort to launch a mobile payments system.  Assuming the chatter is correct, Apple will seek to supplant credit cards with a wireless payment system embedded in its next-gen gizmos, thus
  • How digital retailing could roil local media

    Newsosaur
    13 Aug 2014 | 5:00 am
    Thanks to the growing ubiquity of mobile devices, a digital revolution is about to transform bricks-and-mortar retailing – a fast-breaking phenomenon that potentially poses the biggest challenge yet to the economics of local media companies.  More than four out of five smartphone and tablet owners use their devices for shopping, according to a report issued earlier this year by the Nielsen
  • Are newspapers doomed? It depends.

    Newsosaur
    7 Aug 2014 | 1:12 pm
    Now that every major media company has dumped or soon will jettison its print division, the question I hear every day is: Are newspapers doomed? The answer is neither simple nor universal. But the dramatic and traumatic contraction of the newspaper industry in the last decade suggests that the business models, publishing platforms and journalistic conventions that seemed so stable and certain a
  • Robots could do better than some journalists

    Newsosaur
    22 Jul 2014 | 3:17 pm
    When the Associated Press announced plans to use computers to write corporate earnings stories, a number of journalists asked me if I was as horrified by the prospect as they were.  In fact, I think robots could do better than some reporters. With all respect and affection for my fellow journalists, I have concluded that a well-programmed set of algorithms can be far more analytic and
 
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    Poynter. » MediaWire

  • Advice for newspaper editors: Pay attention to BuzzFeed

    Sam Kirkland
    16 Sep 2014 | 8:17 am
    A group of legacy media executives was told on Monday that it has a lot to learn from the likes of BuzzFeed. “You may not approve of their editorial content,” said Amy Webb, CEO of Webbmedia Group. “But you must learn from their digital strategy.” During a presentation at the ASNE-APME 2014: Fast Forward conference in Chicago, Webb praised BuzzFeed’s use of data analysis to predict user behavior based on variables like time of day, which photos are used, and social networks. She mentioned Vox, Vice and even TMZ as brands with strong voices succeeding across platforms by…
  • ‘I tweeted a funeral. (On assignment.) Creepy? Public service? You decide.’

    Carol Rosenberg
    16 Sep 2014 | 8:09 am
    This story originally ran on Saturday, Sept. 13, in the Miami Herald. It has been reposted with permission. Carol Rosenberg will be featured Tuesday night on @muckrack’s #MuckedUp chat. When I report from Guantánamo for the Miami Herald, I routinely use Twitter to report war court proceedings, play by play, like a sporting event, as one of my editors described it. I sit in a filing center, pay $150 a week to hook up to the Internet and watch the court on a closed-circuit feed. I go to Guantánamo because it is there that I can talk to the lawyers and the prosecutors to write a more…
  • Newspaper revenue will rise — just not in North America

    Andrew Beaujon
    16 Sep 2014 | 7:59 am
    PwC | The Guardian Newspaper revenue “will start to climb again in 2015,” a recent report from PwC says. Things look bright for newspapers in large markets like Brazil, Mexico and China, the report says, as well as smaller markets like Hong Kong, Turkey and Peru. The data come from PwC’s Global Entertainment and Media Outlook report, which came out in June. But it’s a different story in the U.S. and Western Europe. While compound annual growth rate for papers is expected to increase by 8.3 percent in China and 7.5 percent in India, CAGR will fall 4.3 percent in North…
  • Zakaria plagiarized in TV show, critics say

    Andrew Beaujon
    16 Sep 2014 | 5:57 am
    Good morning. Here are 10 media stories. Zakaria plagiarized in TV show, critics say: Mysterious media critics @blippoblappo and @crushingbort tell Poynter they will have another post on Our Bad Media later this morning outlining what they say are examples of Fareed Zakaria lifting text, this time for his CNN show, “GPS.” Here’s a video that will accompany the piece. @blippoblappo and @crushingbort’s last post, in August, outlined suspect passages in Zakaria’s 2008 book, “The Post-American World” and in stories in Newsweek and Foreign Affairs. Neither…
  • Today in media history: Steve Jobs leaves and returns to Apple

    David Shedden
    16 Sep 2014 | 4:00 am
    Two of the biggest news stories about Apple’s Steve Jobs took place on September 16. Jobs resigned from Apple on September 16, 1985. Twelve years later, on September 16, 1997, he became interim CEO. Although the producers of this 1985 video couldn’t have known it at the time, they recorded one of the last interviews with Jobs before he left the company. “In the wake of his resignation from Apple Computer last week, cofounder Steve Jobs spent three and a half hours talking about his ordeal, as well as his past and future, with Newsweek’s Gerald C. Lubenow and Michael…
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    SeanBlanda.com

  • The Rise of Content-First Startup

    Blanda
    27 Aug 2014 | 5:59 pm
    Most content websites have the same problem: They’ve assembled an audience. Paying for it? Well, that’s another story. Startups have the reverse problem: they have a product they need to sell immediately, but no audience. As a result we’ve seen startups having robust blogs or newsletter arms that drive that is then given something to buy. I wrote about this collision of journalism and everything else in 2011, and at the time, it was unclear whether this plan would, you know, work. But I think we’re past the stage of “if” a content-first startup isa viable…
  • What I Learned Launching a Print Magazine

    Blanda
    21 Aug 2014 | 6:00 pm
    As news sites continue to grapple for revenue opportunities, a few have returned the familiar ground of print (like Pando, Model View Culture, Grantland, Contently, The Great Discontent, and others). There’s a rising trend of sites that are using online content to build an audience that they turn into a subscriber list which they then charge to send a curated printed product. At 99U we’ve spent the majority of 2014 experimenting with this dynamic. The result is the 99U Quarterly, which is (at least at first) only available to people who have attended the 99U Conference. We…
  • Pretty Much Everything I Know About the News Business

    Blanda
    16 Mar 2014 | 5:00 am
    This was first published on Medium here. Last month, venture capitalist Marc Andreessen posted what, in his view, was the future of the news business. Reactions were varied, but everyone had one. I joked that my entire Twitter stream was people replying to Andreessen as he has very publicly thrown himself into the future of news conversation. We need new voices in this discussion like Andreessen, but his post was too… nice. I’d bet he left his more candid insights out. After the post, I found myself wishing someone would share more actionable observations from the industry. So,…
  • AxisPhilly, The William Penn Foundation, and “Old Philadelphia”

    Blanda
    12 Aug 2013 | 5:01 pm
    On July 11, Philadelphia’s AxisPhilly, a public affairs news site bankrolled by the William Penn Foundation parted ways with its CEO Neil Budde, a move which will likely lead to the site being shuttered or significantly downsized. I no longer live in Philadelphia and am no longer involved in the day-to-day operations of its media community via Technically Philly, but the news of Budde’s departure left me a mix of angry, upset, and frustrated. Why? The Inquirer/Daily News/Philly.com ownership group has changed hands several times while executing a series of perplexing business…
  • The Introversion Bubble

    Blanda
    19 Apr 2013 | 6:17 pm
    This post was originally published on Medium. Recently, I attended a conference alone. When it came to the conference’s opening night cocktail hour, I was a bit nervous. I knew none of the attendees, and nobody wants to be the person standing alone at a party, fiddling around on their phone pretending to answer email. After exploring the hotel lobby, I dutifully made the rounds, introducing myself to folks at the bar, folks in mid-conversation around the space, and people catching fresh air outside. Tired, I sat down at a nearby table. Seated there were three women, ten to fifteen years…
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    Media Disruptus

  • A dilemma: Where to host a social-media discussion group

    Steve Outing
    10 Sep 2014 | 5:10 pm
    This week I launched an online community called Writing About the Future, on Facebook Groups. Not everyone who was interested in joining the group was happy that I chose to host it on Facebook. They can be grouped into two simple categories: Yes, Facebook isn’t the ideal home for an online community like Writing About...
  • Writing About the Future: A new community you should join!

    Steve Outing
    7 Sep 2014 | 12:53 pm
    Do you write about the future(s)? Then I hope that you’ll join this new Facebook group/community, “Writing About the Future,” which I just launched. It’s for: Journalists Writers Authors Scriptwriters Filmmakers Educators Students Artists And anyone who wants to learn, share, and/or teach how to write about and anticipate likely futures better
  • Future scenarios at work as a tool for climate advocacy

    Steve Outing
    4 Sep 2014 | 3:39 pm
    “The weather today in 2050 … well, it sucks.” In the world of Foresight (a.k.a., Future Studies or Futurism), “scenarios” are a popular tool for anticipating possible futures. (Note the plural.) Scenarios also can be used in a more restricted way as an effective advocacy tool. A great example of this is happening currently, with...
  • Future of news scenarios show what’s (likely) to happen with newspapers

    Steve Outing
    6 Aug 2014 | 2:50 pm
    What will happen to the newspaper industry in the next half decade? No One In the World can accurately predict one future for newspapers, or even for one specific newspaper. But we can reasonably determine what are the most likely, plausible 5-year-out futures. As part of my continuing series of demonstrating and applying Foresight methods...
  • Predict future news events with web data

    Steve Outing
    15 Jul 2014 | 2:56 pm
    Is it possible to know the future? In general, the answer is a resounding “No!” But in certain instances, tools are emerging to predict what might happen in the near future with high probability. This kind of knowledge — say, that civil unrest and violence is likely to erupt in a specific country within the...
 
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    Teaching Online Journalism

  • The coming death of print newspapers

    Mindy McAdams
    24 Aug 2014 | 7:47 am
    Say you’re a journalist now working for a newspaper. You know your job is anything but secure. I asked several reporters, editors, and scholars what journalists should do to get ready for the next wave of firings. There were three strong consensus answers: first, get good at understanding and presenting data. Second, understand how social media can work as a newsroom tool. Third, get whatever newsroom experience you can working in teams, and in launching new things. That’s from Clay Shirky, writing in Last Call: The end of the printed newspaper. He goes on to explain those three…
  • Setting up a private WordPress.com blog for group editing

    Mindy McAdams
    15 Jun 2014 | 8:16 am
    When you have a free WordPress.com blog, you can make it private, limiting it to only people you select. You can also allow multiple authors, editors, or a mix of roles on a free WordPress.com blog, whether it is private or public. Here’s what I learned by setting up a private blog that gave editing privileges to several users: It was easy to make it private: Dashboard > Settings > Reading — find and tick “I would like my site to be private, visible only to users I choose.” It was easy to add new users and assign “roles” to them: Dashboard >…
  • Journalism education: There is no spoon

    Mindy McAdams
    10 Jun 2014 | 9:03 am
    At a journalism education conference in Canada recently, it appears media economics scholar Robert Picard gave a stirring keynote address. Stirring as in “stir things up!” He began by reminding the audience that journalism and the media environment today are vastly different from what they were in the previous century. I’d say the decline began in 1995 and became undeniably apparent around 2008, when job losses in the newspaper industry first spiked. Of course, you know this. But probably you take it for granted. Probably, like most journalism educators, you have not really…
  • Teaching online journalism in South Africa

    Mindy McAdams
    14 May 2014 | 2:22 am
    Thanks to an invitation from the School of Journalism and Media Studies at Rhodes University, I was awarded a Mellon Scholar-in-Residence fellowship. I’ve been in Grahamstown, South Africa, since May 30. Here are some things I have learned so far. Journalism education A journalism degree here can take three years or four. A student must apply to be accepted for a fourth year. Others go straight into newsrooms after the third year. The academic year begins in February, after the long summer break (December and January). They have four terms, with two terms constituting a semester. At the…
  • (Re)defining multimedia journalism

    Mindy McAdams
    19 Apr 2014 | 9:23 am
    I published a post on Medium.com 11 days ago. The title is (Re)defining multimedia journalism. I thought it would be interesting to publish it there, instead of here, on my own blog, and see what would happen. Medium has this nice graph with options to see how many people viewed my post, or how many people READ my post. (I don’t have that option in WordPress.) I also get to see how many people recommended my post (and who they are), and the percentage of readers out of viewers. I feel good that 992 people read my post, but not so good that only 37 percent who viewed it actually read it.
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    Evolving Newsroom

  • How to add macrons to Māori words

    Julie Starr
    14 Sep 2014 | 8:24 pm
    UPDATED Macrons are the little lines on top of a vowel that indicate it should be pronounced LONG rather than short.  If you’re not sure where to use macrons when typing Māori, try the Māori Dictionary (there’s also an app). Below are a few ways of adding macrons to Māori words on your keyboard. Newer Macs Windows 7 or later Older PCs Older Macs 1. Newer Macs Hold down the letter on your keyboard and a little menu will appear with all possible accents/macron. It looks like this: Type in the number of (or click on) the accent/macron you want. If you would prefer to use…
  • Bookmarks for September 14, 2014

    Julie Starr
    13 Sep 2014 | 5:14 pm
    [toread] Microservices The term “Microservice Architecture” has sprung up over the last few years to describe a particular way of designing software applications as suites of… [toread] How Google can really help news & media Earlier this month, folks from Google invited me along with Kara Swisher and Audrey Cooper for a conversation about the future of news. Towards the end of the… The Navy Tests Its Ships in This Indoor Ocean | Innovation | Smithsonian New technology can precisely recreate eight open-water conditions [toread] New Zealand | GISWatch Background: New Zealand’s…
  • Bookmarks for September 3, 2014

    Julie Starr
    2 Sep 2014 | 2:07 pm
      AskAway | AskAway Ask the parties your questions this election. Merchant Navy to be honoured with harbour bridge flag | NZ Transport Agency The Red Ensign will, for the first time, be flown from the Auckland Harbour Bridge alongside New Zealand’s national flag on Wednesday (3 September) to commemorate the role of the Merchant Navy in wartime. [toread] How the Public Actually Uses Local Government Web Maps: Metrics from Denver | EngagingCities With ever-present budget pressures, GIS heads are wrestling with which combination of server admin and paid cloud subscriptions (ESRI,…
  • Say hello to Ugly River, our newest official name

    Julie Starr
    1 Sep 2014 | 7:36 pm
    Browsing the NZ Gazette, the government’s official newspaper, last week I came across a parcel of new official geographic names being approved and one or two discontinued. This happens fairly often as it turns out and this Land Information New Zealand page is a good place to get a heads-up.  There’s plenty of detail too on the naming process, including a checklist for proposing a name and a flowchart describing the process. All the names of all the New Zealand places (as in mountains and lakes but not as in street names) are held in the: New Zealand Gazetteer of Official…
  • “If you can’t protect it, don’t collect it”

    Julie Starr
    31 Aug 2014 | 4:41 pm
    The recent theft of the personal data of 4.5 million patients of a US hospital chain prompted Bloomberg to look at the Top 10 Data Breaches of all time. In their story, they wrote: The recent attack has gained notoriety for its methods, rather than its size — the hacking group has been prolific in attacking U.S. medical-device companies and drug makers. The chart below shows how the Chinese breach compares with others. The ranking provides little solace if you’re one of the people whose personal information was stolen and used for identity theft. Yet, with security-software maker…
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    LOCAL ONLINER

  • Signpost: CRM, Marketing Automation Enhance Promotions

    Peter
    10 Sep 2014 | 4:22 pm
    Deals and coupons remain anchors for local business promotion. But they can now be customized based on customer behavior and better marketing automation tools. Signpost is eager to leverage these developments. While the 200 person company launched in 2011 as a “Deals Scout” and promotions manager – initially supporting Google Offers and others — it has increasingly gotten into software development. Today, the company – which has raised about $15 million from Spark Capital, Google Ventures, OpenView Venture Partners and others — announced a new strategy that…
  • A Few Quick Thoughts on Apple’s Big Announcements

    Peter
    9 Sep 2014 | 1:39 pm
    A lot of us were glued to our screens today to watch or catch the feeds on the Apple announcements re iPhone 6, iPhone 6 Plus, Apple Pay and Apple Watch. What will the new announcements mean to our local ecosystem? To date, Apple’s focus on local has mostly been geared to Apple Maps. But here are a few things: 1. More content for larger screens. When the iPad was introduced, vendors such as Matchbin bet the bank that it would lead to higher paid subscriptions and new types of advertising. It didn’t really happen. But more content is behind the firewall now than before. The intro of the…
  • Kilponen: SMB Retailers Need to Focus on Foot Traffic Drivers

    Peter
    9 Sep 2014 | 11:24 am
    What should SMB retailers do to level the playing field with larger regional and national retailers? There are no easy answers, but they should really focus on mobile and geo location targeting, says Wanderful Media COO Doug Kilponen. Search has major limitations for them. “In the old days, you could create free traffic from Google and the like. But SEO is dead for small retailers,” says Kilponen, previously CMO at Merchant Circle. “It’s been taken up by the Amazons and Google of the world. If you do a search term on products, it is a black hole. You can rarely find a way out.”…
  • Merchants Helping Neighboring Merchants: Ex Constant Contacter Launches Alignable

    Peter
    8 Sep 2014 | 5:01 pm
    One idea we’ve kicked around for a while is that merchants can generate business tips and customer referrals for neighboring merchants in a strip mall, or down the street. Why shouldn’t the cooking store people refer customers to the gourmet grocery? Or the hardware store people refer customers to plant nursery? At least, they can share tips about landlords, taxes, advertising and supplies. At this point, several companies have tried it. It has been a leading premise behind the launch of local sites such as MerchantCircle and ShopCity. The popularization of social media has led…
  • Acxiom Launches Self Serve SMB Marketing Effort

    Peter
    4 Sep 2014 | 3:16 pm
    Consumer data giant Acxiom is moving downstream with a self-serve leads products tailored to SMBs. The new SMB product, “MyAcxiomPartner,” allows SMBs to develop customer lists on a hyperlocal basis, using either addresses or polygon mapping. The effort is part of Acxiom’s “Audience Operating System,” a consumer data campaign management tool that has been developed at a cost estimated at tens of millions of dollars. The AOS is part of a vision by CEO Scott Howe to enable Acxiom’s data to be easily and readily available to all kinds of marketers across many channels. Howe’s…
 
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    yelvington.com

  • Something to think about on Labor Day

    yelvington
    1 Sep 2014 | 6:52 am
    What happens when your job is automated out of existence? "Knowledge workers" have imagined themselves immune, but machine learning changes everything. It is great that technology lifts the yoke of labor from humanity. It's not so great when humanity is left with nothing. In our economic system, the benefits of such change do not accrue to the freed labor. We may need to rethink that.
  • Traditional American values

    yelvington
    4 Jul 2014 | 8:49 am
    It is the Fourth of July, Independence Day in the United States, a day when we dress up in red/white/blue outfits, eat hot dogs and barbecue, and set off small explosives. It also is a day for pontificating about what it is to be an American. We don't really need a special day for that, as we now are in a state of continuous political campaigning and under a barrage of propaganda from our "deregulated" broadcasting industry. But a comment that I saw the other day about how we need to return to "traditional American values" is stuck in my head, so I am going to do a bit of pontificating of my…
  • The episode in which I cause the sky to fall on journalism as we know it

    yelvington
    18 Apr 2014 | 12:05 pm
    I was part of a panel discussion of metrics and analytics in the newsroom a couple of weeks ago at the Journalism Interactive conference at the University of Maryland. I approached the subject with some trepidation. Some journalists are resistant to the very idea of measurement, often downright innumerate, and sometimes hostile to any idea that doesn't lead us all back into the honey and clover of the 1980s, before the Internet came along and turned it all into snakes and bees. But I was heartened to find that the room was full of people who were clearly very interested in the subject and…
  • Milepost 20

    yelvington
    2 Apr 2014 | 9:53 am
    I passed another milepost yesterday. April 1 was my 20th anniversary in digital media. I moved from the print newsroom of the Star Tribune on April 1, 1994, found a desk in the tech office, and started noodling on a website prototype on a Mac Quadra. The Web in those days was primitive and the Internet in general was barely out from under "acceptable use policies" that forbade commercial activity. There were no authoring tools. Web browsers couldn't even do tables, so layout was out of the question. Within a month or so we made a decision to skip the Web and build on a commercial online…
  • Spotted gets a new framework

    yelvington
    5 Mar 2014 | 12:02 pm
    Back in the last decade we created a community photo-sharing platform called Spotted. The original idea was borrowed from a simple, successful content/marketing program at Cox Interactive Media, where I was executive editor at the turn of the century. We sent someone with a digital camera to an event with instructions to turn around and shoot the spectators, and hand out business cards. The resulting slideshows were huge traffic generators. At Morris, this was merged with the "anyone can post" philosophy of Flickr and eventually implemented as a Morris DigitalWorks tool that became a…
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    News

  • "Ignite Your Passion" Workshop Inspires Great Work

    2094
    13 Sep 2014 | 6:55 pm
    John Blunda said he struck while the iron was hot. The Portland photojournalist said when his station recently hired a news director, he quickly lobbied his new boss to “bring Maine to a new level of storytelling.”
  • Support National Press Photographers Foundation, Scholarships Through Amazon Smile

    2094
    10 Sep 2014 | 11:17 am
    In the coming year, the National Press Photographers Foundation will celebrate its 40th anniversary. Foundation President Tom Hardin has announced a campaign to raise money to increase scholarship stipends in the coming years, and a goal to create additional scholarships for students enrolled in accredited four-year college programs. 
  • Google, Photographers Settle Litigation Over Books

    2094
    5 Sep 2014 | 11:40 am
    A group of photographers, visual artists and affiliated associations have reached a settlement with Google in a lawsuit over copyrighted material in Google Books. The parties are pleased to have reached a settlement that benefits everyone and includes funding for the PLUS Coalition, a non-profit organization dedicated to helping rightsholders and users communicate clearly and efficiently about rights in works.
  • Jon Lowenstein Wins 2014 Lange-Taylor Prize

    2094
    4 Sep 2014 | 3:07 pm
    The Center for Documentary Studies at Duke University has awarded the twenty-second Dorothea Lange–Paul Taylor Prize to American photographer, filmmaker, and writer Jon Lowenstein for “South Side,” his testimony to the Chicago neighborhood where he has lived and worked for over a decade.
  • Apply Now For A Fulbright-National Geographic Fellowship

    2094
    4 Sep 2014 | 9:40 am
    The Fulbright-National Geographic Digital Storytelling Fellowship was launched in 2013 as a new component of the Fulbright U.S. Student Program. It provides opportunities for U.S. citizens to participate in an academic year of overseas travel and digital storytelling in up to three countries on a globally significant theme. This Fellowship is made possible through a partnership between the U.S. Department of State and the National Geographic Society.
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    Online Journalism Blog

  • 16 reasons why this research will change how you look at news consumption

    Paul Bradshaw
    10 Sep 2014 | 6:09 am
    Image by Zilverbat Most research on news consumption annoys me. Most research on news consumption – like Pew’s State of the News Media – relies on surveys of people self-reporting how they consume news. But surveys can only answer the questions that they ask. And as any journalist with a decent bullshit detector should know: the problem is people misremember, people forget, and people lie. The most interesting news consumption research uses ethnography: this involves watching people and measuring what they actually do – not what they say they do. To this end…
  • Audio: UK Conference of Science Journalists panel on tools for journalists

    Paul Bradshaw
    6 Sep 2014 | 1:50 am
    Back in June I took part in a panel at the UK Conference of Science Journalists conference, discussing tools for reporters alongside BBC Trending’s Mukul Devichand and Digital Science’s community manager Laura Wheeler. The conference website has just published audio of the session, including chair Daniel Clery’s tips and recommendations. You can listen to the clip below. https://s3-eu-west-1.amazonaws.com/ukcsj/2014/Tools_of_the_Trade.mp3Filed under: online journalism Tagged: audio, Laura Wheeler, Mukul Devichand, UK Conference of Science Journalists
  • The Great British Bake Off copyright grab: We can use your #ExtraSlice Twitter images but not give you credit

    Paul Bradshaw
    2 Sep 2014 | 11:58 pm
    Images shared on the #ExtraSlice hashtag. I don’t know who took these* – they waived their moral rights This year’s series of The Great British Bake Off has a social media-savvy spin-off: An Extra Slice. It’s a mix of interviews, punditry and contributions from audience members and viewers. But the programme makers have a curious approach to copyright law which users of Twitter and Instagram may be ‘agreeing’ to without knowing about it. The official Twitter account for the programme -@BritishBakeOff – regularly directs followers to tweet…
  • Hyperlocal Voices: Geraldine Durrant, East Grinstead Online

    Damian Radcliffe
    28 Aug 2014 | 1:38 am
    For the latest in our series of Hyperlocal Voices Damian Radcliffe heads back home to Sussex. Geraldine Durrant,  Editor of East Grinstead Online, explains how the site – ‘an idea whose time had come’ – serves the popular market town. Launched just four months ago, East Grinstead Online is already generating substantial traffic, and publishes multiple stories every day. Here’s their story… 1.  Who were the people behind the blog? I have been a journalist all my working life, and many years ago was news editor of the local paid-for paper. I moved on as Group…
  • FAQ: Do you need new ethics for computational journalism?

    Paul Bradshaw
    16 Aug 2014 | 12:55 am
    This latest post in the FAQ series answers questions posed by a student in Belgium regarding ethics and data journalism. Q: Do ethical issues in the practice of computational journalism differ from those of “traditional” journalism? No, I don’t think they do particularly – any more than ethics in journalism differ from ethics in life in general. However, as in journalism versus life, there are areas which attract more attention because they are the places we find the most conflict between different ethical demands. For example, the tension between public interest and an…
 
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    Common Sense Journalism

  • FOIA: Another little chip away in South Carolina - criminal suspects' birthdates

    Doug Fisher
    11 Sep 2014 | 1:23 pm
    S.C. officials will find any way they can to withhold more information, it seems. This from The State newspaper this week:The S.C. Department of Public Safety said it no longer will release the date of birth in incidents the agency handles.Failure to provide that information makes it nearly impossible for the public or the media to determine whether a suspect or victim has a criminal history. SLED requires the public to provide a date of birth to do such a search.The agency’s legal staff cites two state laws to bolster its decision: The Family and Personal Identifying Information Privacy…
  • Caveat emptor: Comptek/Universal Media Syndicate, Aereo and morally challeged newspapers

    Doug Fisher
    7 Sep 2014 | 1:50 pm
    We've all seen them, the full-page ads for Amish heaters (where it doesn't exactly say but where, apparently, primarily only the frames are made by the Amish), "rare" coins and bills, etc. While the debate about "native advertising" in digital rages in various forums (punctuated by John Oliver's hilarious takedown of it), the old-fashioned "advertorial" has become more and more a staple (from my observations) for cash-strapped newspapers.But even newspapers have some moral, if not legal, obligation, it seems to me to at least give these things a vetting for being misleading -- and, frankly,…
  • FOIA: Kudos to The State for laying out the problems

    Doug Fisher
    7 Sep 2014 | 1:06 pm
    The State newspaper, in conjunction with McClatchy's chain-wide news service, does a good job today of laying out the abuses of using "contract" workers in the construction industry.But deserving of just as much of a kudos is the paper's sidebar, Getting records from Columbia Housing Authority is expensive, slow, that lays out how agencies do their best to make it hard to get information. In this case it was charging more than $1,400 for the records in which the Social Security numbers were redacted.One thing that might have made this a bit stronger was taking the $1,075 for copying costs and…
  • FOIA: Bill Rogers guest post

    Doug Fisher
    5 Sep 2014 | 11:19 am
    A guest post this week by the S.C. Press Association's Bill Rogers praising some school board members for having the backbone to walk out of a board meeting that might have been illegal.As you read through consider the lawyer's comment, which brings to mind the retort, Well, if you'd stop practicing the law and actually become proficient at it ...Lowcountry board members show guts to leave secret meeting they thought illegal By Bill RogersThree school board members in the Lowcountry took a courageous step last week when they refused to attend an executive session they felt was illegal. If…
  • New archive for The Convergence Newsletter

    Doug Fisher
    2 Sep 2014 | 5:30 am
    The Convergence Newsletter archives have a new address:http://sc.edu/cmcis/archive/convergence/
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    The Newspaper Guild

  • Settled Grievances a Financial Win for 14 at Post-Dispatch

    Janelle
    16 Sep 2014 | 7:35 am
    Jeff GordonSeptember 16, 2014United Media GuildTwo United Media Guild's grievances on behalf of seven journalists and seven ad salespeople have led to financial settlements for all 14. The union fought for higher pay for copy editors and against penalties for salespeople that were taking away money earned on the print side if they failed to make digital-side goals.
  • RCFP: Interfere with Access to Information and We'll Sue You

    Janelle
    16 Sep 2014 | 6:45 am
    Jonathan PetersSeptember 16, 2014CJRThe Reporters Committee for Freedom of the Press has hired its first litigation director, Katie Townsend (pictured), to bring lawsuits around the country in cases that affect access to information for the press and public. Although the RCFP has provided legal assistance to journalists for nearly 45 years—developing media law guides, filing amicus briefs, issuing statements, answering questions, making referrals to outside counsel—not since the 1980s has the RCFP itself been active as a litigant. It is re-entering that arena now to help fill a void…
  • FBI Warned Foleys of Prosecution if They Paid Son's Ransom

    Janelle
    16 Sep 2014 | 6:38 am
    Rukmini CallimachiSeptember 16, 2014The New York TimesThe email appeared in Michael Foley’s inbox a year after his brother James disappeared on a reporting trip in northern Syria. His captors wanted money. Cautiously hopeful, Michael Foley and his parents, John and Diane, turned over the email to the FBI agent assigned to their case. The agent provided general guidance but also some stern warnings: The United States would never trade prisoners for hostages, nor would it under any circumstances pay ransom. Moreover, the government told the Foleys that it was a crime for private citizens to…
  • Dramatic First Few Months for Dean Baquet at the NY Times

    Janelle
    16 Sep 2014 | 6:31 am
    Lloyd GroveSeptember 16, 2014The New York TimesNew York Times Executive Editor Dean Baquet talks with The Daily Beast about Jill Abramson, race, surviving cancer and his fear for war-zone journalists today. “My biggest concern is how to cover the world right now when it’s really dangerous,” he says, adding that as veteran correspondents rotate home from war zones in Iraq and Afghanistan, he’s going to need younger, equally brave but prudent reporters to take their place. “How the hell are we going to cover what is a new, heightened U.S. intervention in a region in which the enemies…
  • Finally! Justice for NABET Members Fired from CNN in 2003

    Janelle
    15 Sep 2014 | 4:23 pm
    StaffSeptember 15, 2014CWAAfter 11 years, CNN employees finally have a measure of justice. The National Labor Relations Board (NLRB) on Monday found “overwhelming” evidence of anti-union animus at the cable news giant and ordered it to “make whole” more than 300 employees who lost their jobs and the benefits of union representation in the wake of the company’s phony reorganization scheme to get rid of unionized workers. "On behalf of our CNN members in Washington, D.C. and New York City, the National Association of Broadcast Employees and Technicians-Communications Workers of…
 
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    OUPblog » Media

  • Dallas Cowboys: seven strategies that will guarantee a successful 2014 season

    Daniella Frangione
    5 Sep 2014 | 3:30 am
    As a football team, the Dallas Cowboys are mired in mediocrity. In the 19 years since they last won the Super Bowl, their regular season record is a middling 146-142. The team made the playoffs seven times during that span, with only two wins to show for its efforts. The prognosis for the 2014 season is more of the same. As a business, however, the Dallas Cowboys are extraordinary. Forbes values the team at $3.2 billion, ranking number one among all NFL teams, and there are few signs of slowing growth. Win or lose this season, the Cowboys will still be a profitable and healthy business by…
  • Publishing tips from a journal editor: selecting the right journal

    MAlvarez
    17 Aug 2014 | 3:30 am
    One of the most common questions that scholars confront is trying to find the right journal for their research papers. When I go to conferences, often I am asked: “How do I know if Political Analysis is the right journal for my work?” This is an important question, in particular for junior scholars who don’t have a lot of publishing experience — and for scholars who are nearing important milestones (like contract renewal, tenure, and promotion). In a publishing world where it may take months for an author to receive an initial decision from a journal, and then many…
  • Technologies of sexiness

    Elizabeth Gorney
    10 Aug 2014 | 3:30 am
    What does it mean for a woman to “feel sexy”? In our current consumer culture, the idea of achieving sexiness is all-pervasive: an expectation of contemporary femininity, wrapped up in objects ranging from underwear, shoes, sex toys, and erotic novels. Particular celebrities and “sex symbol” icons, ranging throughout the decades, are said to embody it: Marilyn Monroe, Brigitte Bardot, Farrah Fawcett, Madonna, Sharon Stone, Pamela Anderson, Kim Kardashian, Miley Cyrus, Megan Fox. Ways of achieving sexiness are suggested by new sex experts, confidence and self-esteem…
  • My client’s online presence

    Elizabeth Gorney
    9 Aug 2014 | 5:30 am
    Social media and other technologies have changed how we communicate. Consider how we coordinate events and contact our friends and family members today, versus how we did it 20 or 30 years ago. Today, we often text, email, or communicate through social media more frequently than we phone or get together in person. Now contrast that with psychotherapy, which is still about two people getting together in a room and talking. Certainly, technology has changed psychotherapy. There are now apps for mental health issues. There are virtual reality treatments. Psychotherapy can now be provided through…
  • Youth and the new media: what next?

    Elizabeth Gorney
    8 Aug 2014 | 4:30 am
    Now that the Internet has been with us for over 25 years, what are we to make of all the concerns about how this new medium is affecting us, especially the young digital natives who know more about how to maneuver in this space than most adults? Although it is true that various novel media platforms have invaded households in the United States, many researchers still focus on the harms that the “old” media of television and movies still have on youth. The effects of advertising on promoting the obesity epidemic highlight how so much of those messages are directed to children and…
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    Blogposts | The Guardian

  • Is whaling the biggest threat to whales?

    Karl Mathiesen
    16 Sep 2014 | 8:52 am
    As countries meet in Slovenia to discuss proposals for whale conservation the headlines are dominated by the activities of whaling nations. Karl Mathiesen, with your help, investigates whether were right to focus so much on whaling compared to other threats, from shipping to climate change.Post your thoughts in the comments below, email karl.mathiesen.freelance@theguardian.com or tweet @karlmathiesen 4.46pm BST Many of those who object to whaling on moral grounds accept that hunting some species is not necessarily a threat to their survival. Norway, which operates the worlds only outwardly…
  • US troops could perform 'close combat advising' to local forces in Iraq, Pentagon says  live

    Tom McCarthy in New York
    16 Sep 2014 | 8:52 am
    Missions such as retaking Mosul could warrant role, general saysChuck Hagel: We are at war with IsisDefense secretary says he has approved strikes inside SyriaPentagon: This wont look like a shock-and-awe campaignSaudi Arabia will host training ground for Syrian opposition Chelsea Manning: How to make Isis fall on its own sword 11.52am ET Graham: Is there any doubt in your mind that if Isil had the capability to kill millions of Americans, they would do so?Neither Graham nor Hagel doubts as much. 11.51am ET Lindsey Graham, Republican of South Carolina, asks Dempsey what destroying Isil would…
  • Labour: cost of living squeeze continues despite lower inflation - business live

    Graeme Wearden
    16 Sep 2014 | 8:51 am
    Rolling business and finance news, including the latest UK inflation figures and market reaction ahead of Thursdays Scottish independence voteAfternoon summaryConsumer Prices Index drops in August <- coverage starts hereLabour: No respite for workersFuel and food prices fall, but clothing risesScottish house prices now over pre-crisis peakHouse prices have surged 11.7% in the last year Black Wednesday, 22 years on....In other news:Ruble hits record lowASOS shares slide 4.51pm BST More on the forthcoming polls on the Scottish referendum from analyst Mike Smithson:Tonight's TNS poll is about…
  • Scottish independence referendum: Ed Miliband disrupted by yes campaigners - live

    Andrew Sparrow
    16 Sep 2014 | 8:49 am
    Cameron/Miliband/Cleggs vow - Summary and analysisAlex Salmonds BBC Radio Scotland interview - SummaryLunchtime summaryEd Miliband disrupted by yes campaigners 4.49pm BST Here is some Twitter reaction to the Cameron/Miliband/Clegg vow. Some of the tweets are from commentators I recognise, and some arent.If theyre all sceptical (or worse), thats because I could not find any positive ones.'The vow' is also devoid of substance, so it'll piss off Scots and the rest of the UK. Finally, then, we have unity again.To assess the Devo Panic 'vow', just read the 3 autographs at the bottom - Cameron,…
  • Browns' Brian Hoyer lifts spirits in an otherwise rotten week for the NFL

    Paolo Bandini and Max Whittle
    16 Sep 2014 | 8:38 am
    Adrian Peterson and Ray Rice cases put the pressure on Roger Goodell; Browns QB makes us say: Johnny who?; and Washington have an RG3 dilemmaAlan Yuhas: Midnight in the garden of Goodell and evilThis has been a grim start to the new NFL season. The action on the field remains as compelling as ever, with upsets, fourth-quarter comebacks and big plays galore this weekend. But all of that has been overshadowed by acts of violence away from the gridiron. Writing on his MMQB website, Peter King described it as, the most ceaselessly miserable [week] Ive seen in my 31 seasons covering the…
 
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    blog maverick

  • Another interview about streaming media from 1999

    CyberDust ID - Blogmaverick
    24 Aug 2014 | 7:35 pm
    As I clean up or find old emails for whatever reason, its always interesting to run across old interviews I did about the future of streaming media.  This interview was with Kevin Werbach who along with Esther Dyson wrote one of the leading newsletters of the time. Here is the entire email, the good and the bad At 02:48 PM 8/9/99 -0400, Kevin Werbach wrote: Thanks for your message.  I’ll definitely be in touch when I put the piece together (probably either September or October), as your perspective would be very helpful. The primary question I’m asking is how streaming video…
  • The 6 Things You Need to Know to be Great in Business

    CyberDust ID - Blogmaverick
    16 Aug 2014 | 11:22 pm
    There are no shortcuts in business.  In order to be successful there are some things that you must know.  These are not all of them by a long shot, but IMHO they are 6 of the most important   1. Know how to sell. Selling means being able to convey why your product or service, which may be you if you are looking for a job,  will make things better. Selling is never about convincing. It is always about helping. 2. Put yourself in the shoes of your customer If you know how to put the person you are dealing with in a position to succeed, you can be successful. In order to do this, you…
  • AEREO – Everything Old is New Again

    CyberDust ID - Blogmaverick
    19 Jul 2014 | 4:30 pm
    AEREO deserves a lot of credit for their effort.  It was a long and expensive shot to do what they went for.  But they went for it.  And they attempted to pivot after their SCOTUS loss. I was watching with interest, because it is something we had examined 15 years ago at Broadcast.com The technology has obviously gotten better on all sides of the equation, but sometimes a good idea is a good idea. Even if it is hard to make work.  This is from January of 2000. What is fascinating is the alliances and attempts that were being made or considered.   We also did the same kind of work to…
  • The Idiots Guide to High Frequency Trading

    CyberDust ID - Blogmaverick
    3 Apr 2014 | 1:28 pm
    First, let me say what you read here is going to be wrong in several ways.  HFT covers such a wide path of trading that different parties participate or are impacted in different ways. I wanted to put this out there as a starting point . Hopefully the comments will help further educate us all 1.  Electronic trading is part of HFT, but not all electronic trading is high frequency trading. Trading equities and other financial instruments has been around for a long time.  it is Electronic Trading that has lead to far smaller spreads and lower actual trading costs from your broker.  Very…
  • High Frequency Trading, and Proof that the SEC Approach to Insider Trading is Completely Wrong

    CyberDust ID - Blogmaverick
    2 Apr 2014 | 7:05 am
    Got to love Mary Jo White, the Chairwoman of the SEC.  While Michael Lewis’s book Flash Boys was getting all the headlines and was the topic of some of the best television  on CNBC, ever, Ms White used the firestorm to ask for more money for the SEC. Shocking ? The only shock would be if she didn’t use any occasion the SEC was in the public eye to ask for more money. It is unfortunate because there is no greater waste of money than what the SEC spends trying to enforce  insider trading laws. Let me give you some examples of just how poorly the SEC manages our tax dollars when…
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    One Man and His Blog

  • Shameful Confession

    Adam Tinworth
    16 Sep 2014 | 2:00 am
    I admit it - I rather like the new U2 album, which came free to every one with an iTunes account. I'm a Dad. It's Dad rock. What do you expect? If you don't like it, this will make you happy. And Apple allows you to purge Songs of Innocence from your collection.
  • Inside the Facebook censorship machine

    Adam Tinworth
    15 Sep 2014 | 10:23 am
    Fascinating interview with Monika Bickert, the head of global policy for Facebook: We use technology to help us triage reports, and we also use Microsoft’s Photo DNA to help us prevent images of child exploitation from being uploaded to the site, but human beings are the people responsible for reviewing content at Facebook. We take a lot of pride in that. We have people that are specialized by topic area, so a safety team, which has experts on everything from terrorism to self harm. Then we also have people who are language specialists, so if something is reported from Turkey, the…
  • The digimag bloat problem

    Adam Tinworth
    15 Sep 2014 | 9:51 am
    While I'm quoting Tweets: The people have spoken. And they have said: stop delivering bloated-for-no-reason payloads to my iPad each month. pic.twitter.com/O0E3BZA24F— MG Siegler (@parislemon) September 14, 2014 Hard to disagree. And people have been saying this for a long time. That's not to say that digital magazines can't be done right on tablets. It's just that the current approach of shovelling the print edition into a digital replica, and hiding it behind the Newsstand icon isn't going to work.
  • Teasing the clickthrough, visually

    Adam Tinworth
    15 Sep 2014 | 9:23 am
    Really nice Twitter graphic from the FT communities team. A good "tease" of the clickthrough: Love this quote from @JananGanesh on the desperate attempts to keep Scotland from voting Yes http://t.co/XowUeoZ3Kt pic.twitter.com/ITkW05WxSK— Esther Bintliff (@estherbintliff) September 15, 2014
  • Facebook helps out the satire-challenged

    Adam Tinworth
    11 Sep 2014 | 4:29 am
    This has been lurking in my tabs for a while. Facebook is starting to experimentally mark satirical articles - from The Onion in particular - as such: "We are running a small test which shows the text “[Satire]" in front of links to satirical articles in the related articles unit in News Feed. This is because we received feedback that people wanted a clearer way to distinguish satirical articles from others in these units," a Facebook representative told Mashable. Some feel this isn't needed: @richjm Oh no. Nothing like ruining a good joke by having to tell people it's meant to be…
 
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    The American Prospect

  • What America Needs Is More Senators Who Can Handle Themselves In a Firefight

    Paul Waldman
    16 Sep 2014 | 5:00 am
    Let's be honest: the job of a United States senator does not involve much in the way of gunplay. There's a lot of speechifying, a lot of talking, a lot of trying to stay awake in hearings, and a whole lot of fundraising. But shooting in the course of your duties? Very little, if any at all. I suppose it's possible that we might one day see something like a scene out of a G.I. Joe movie, where terrorist commandos take over the Capitol building and the only thing standing between them and the fall of the United States of America is Barbara Mikulski and her .50-cal Desert Eagle, putting down bad…
  • Two Cheers for Obama: Nobody Makes the Best Out of Bad Situation Like He Does

    Robert Kuttner
    15 Sep 2014 | 9:15 pm
    (U.S. Air Force Photo/Staff Sgt. Jessica Hines) An F-16 Fighting Falcon takes off for Poland, September 5, 2014, from Aviano Air Base, Italy.  This article originally appeared on The Huffington Post. It took President Barack Obama a long time, and multiple stumbles, to back into a foreign policy role that looks something like leadership. If Russian President Putin is agreeing to a cease-fire in Ukraine that just might hold, the U.S.-led combination of pressure and restraint deserves much of the credit. Putin considers the loss of the Ukraine one of the great tragedies of Russian history,…
  • People Facing Death: ISIL, Vietnam, and the Impact of Images

    Paul Waldman
    14 Sep 2014 | 10:47 pm
    (AP Photo/Eddie Adams) Barbie Zelizer is a professor at the Annenberg School for Communication of the University of Pennsylvania, where she teaches and conducts research about the cultural functions of journalism. Her latest book, About to Die: How News Images Move the Public, surveys the history of a particularly powerful kind of image, that of people in the moments before their death. We spoke last week about the way certain images are affecting the debate about recent news events. According to an NBC/WSJ poll, 94 percent of Americans say they heard about the beheadings of journalists James…
  • Republicans Seek to Tar All Muslims With the Brush of ISIL

    Nathalie Baptiste
    14 Sep 2014 | 9:45 pm
    (Photo by Fabio Teixeira / Pacific Press/Sipa USA) (Sipa via AP Images) On Saturday afternoon, news broke that ISIL (also known as ISIS) had uploaded yet another video of one of their members beheading an innocent civilian. The victim, David Haines, was a British aid worker who was captured in Syria last year. According to reports, the video is similar to the brutal murders of American journalists James Foley and Steven Sotloff. The news of this latest execution, and its grisly video, comes on the heels of President Obama’s primetime speech on his strategy for combating the terrorist group…
  • A Book for the People of Ferguson -- And Oppressed People Everywhere

    Peter Dreier
    14 Sep 2014 | 8:53 pm
    Most residents of Ferguson, Missouri, have probably never heard of Fred Ross, Sr., but they could use his help now. Ferguson's population is two-thirds African American, but the mayor, almost all members of the city council and school board, and 95 percent of the police department is white, and in last year's municipal election only 7 percent of blacks came to the polls.  Ross—perhaps the most influential (but little-known) community organizer in American history—had a successful career mobilizing people to challenge police brutality, fight segregation, and organize voter registration…
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    Nieman Lab

  • Jacobin: A Marxist rag run on a lot of petty-bourgeois hustle

    Caroline O'Donovan
    16 Sep 2014 | 7:00 am
    Jacobin Magazine was founded by Bhaskar Sunkara in 2010 while he was still a student at George Washington University. Sunkara had self-identified as a socialist since middle school — or, in his own words, “way too young to make those kind of decisions.” Accordingly, his magazine is a journal of democratic socialist thought — one that’s been creeping closer to mainstream over the last four years. Jacobin, which posts a few essays online everyday and prints a magazine three times a year, has 6,400 active subscribers. Renewal rates are around 70 percent. The website gets…
  • Like it or not, native advertising is squarely inside the big news tent

    Joshua Benton
    15 Sep 2014 | 8:00 am
    Editor’s note: The new issue of our sister publication Nieman Reports is out and ready for you to read. (We’ve already shared a
  • n+1: Learning that print and digital can peacefully coexist

    Caroline O'Donovan
    15 Sep 2014 | 7:00 am
    At ten years old, n+1 is no longer a newcomer to the small magazine scene. Carla Blumenkranz, a contributing editor who recently left for a job at The New Yorker, says when the magazine was founded in 2004, a lot of small print journals were closing. “Now, there are a lot more — there’s New Inquiry, Jacobin, The Baffler is back. It’s a different field,” she says. “It’s a little strange that n+1 is considered established.” Like most of its fellow small magazines, n+1’s reputation exceeds its size. Currently, n+1 employs two people full time.
  • Little magazines gone digital: How the late-adapting literary press has made its way in the web age

    Caroline O'Donovan
    15 Sep 2014 | 7:00 am
    Sometimes it’s a challenge to feel satisfied with the state of the web and the writing therein. When we look at the headlines, the thinkpieces, the gifs, the desperate pleas for engagement, things can seem dire. A sense of ennui takes over. It’s happened to all of us. This feeling often makes readers long for something more. Where does truly good, truly smart, truly informed writing live? we ask. For many, the answer is the same — small literary and cultural magazines. Take, for example, an episode from earlier this summer. Kyle Chayka wrote an essay for The Baffler about the…
  • From Nieman Reports: Where are the women in leadership at news organizations?

    Anna Griffin
    12 Sep 2014 | 8:26 am
    Editor’s note: Our sister publication Nieman Reports is out with its new issue (and new website). Its cover package focuses on a single issue: the status of women in media. Here’s the lead story, by The Oregonian’s Anna Griffin. At a time when women head fewer major U.S. newspapers than they did 10 years ago, there is a place where women run not only some of the nation’s leading papers but the major public TV station and private TV and radio stations, too. In fact, some media leaders and members of the public even feel journalism here needs more men. This land of female…
 
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    Common Sense Journalism

  • FOIA: Another little chip away in South Carolina - criminal suspects' birthdates

    11 Sep 2014 | 1:23 pm
    S.C. officials will find any way they can to withhold more information, it seems. This from The State newspaper this week:The S.C. Department of Public Safety said it no longer will release the date of birth in incidents the agency handles.Failure to provide that information makes it nearly impossible for the public or the media to determine whether a suspect or victim has a criminal history. SLED requires the public to provide a date of birth to do such a search.The agency’s legal staff cites two state laws to bolster its decision: The Family and Personal Identifying Information Privacy…
  • Caveat emptor: Comptek/Universal Media Syndicate, Aereo and morally challeged newspapers

    7 Sep 2014 | 1:50 pm
    We've all seen them, the full-page ads for Amish heaters (where it doesn't exactly say but where, apparently, primarily only the frames are made by the Amish), "rare" coins and bills, etc. While the debate about "native advertising" in digital rages in various forums (punctuated by John Oliver's hilarious takedown of it), the old-fashioned "advertorial" has become more and more a staple (from my observations) for cash-strapped newspapers.But even newspapers have some moral, if not legal, obligation, it seems to me to at least give these things a vetting for being misleading -- and, frankly,…
  • FOIA: Kudos to The State for laying out the problems

    7 Sep 2014 | 1:06 pm
    The State newspaper, in conjunction with McClatchy's chain-wide news service, does a good job today of laying out the abuses of using "contract" workers in the construction industry.But deserving of just as much of a kudos is the paper's sidebar, Getting records from Columbia Housing Authority is expensive, slow, that lays out how agencies do their best to make it hard to get information. In this case it was charging more than $1,400 for the records in which the Social Security numbers were redacted.One thing that might have made this a bit stronger was taking the $1,075 for copying costs and…
  • FOIA: Bill Rogers guest post

    5 Sep 2014 | 11:19 am
    A guest post this week by the S.C. Press Association's Bill Rogers praising some school board members for having the backbone to walk out of a board meeting that might have been illegal.As you read through consider the lawyer's comment, which brings to mind the retort, Well, if you'd stop practicing the law and actually become proficient at it ...Lowcountry board members show guts to leave secret meeting they thought illegal By Bill RogersThree school board members in the Lowcountry took a courageous step last week when they refused to attend an executive session they felt was illegal. If…
  • New archive for The Convergence Newsletter

    2 Sep 2014 | 5:30 am
    The Convergence Newsletter archives have a new address:http://sc.edu/cmcis/archive/convergence/
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    Pacific Standard

  • The Most Popular Posts on PSmag.com and Other Stuff We Liked This Past Week

    Footnotes
    16 Sep 2014 | 8:00 am
    Every week, we share with you our top posts and some of our favorite reads from across the Web. Get all of this—and more—directly in your inbox by signing up for our twice-weekly newsletter. We’re still trumpeting the benefits of drinking alcohol, but we also found out that the effects of “comfort food” are all in your head. Plus, we dug into the dubious new evidence of Jack the Ripper’s DNA (it’s grosser than you’re expecting). 1. The Truth We Won’t Admit: Drinking Is Healthy 2. Comfort Food Is a Myth 3. Jack the Ripper’s DNA: Was Aaron…
  • Does Not Checking Your Buddy’s Facebook Updates Make You a Bad Friend?

    Paul Bisceglio
    16 Sep 2014 | 7:23 am
    Last month, I realized Twitter may be making me a bad friend. I was hiking with a guy named Matt, a buddy of mine since middle school, and we were talking about what was new in our lives because we hadn’t seen each other for seven months. Halfway up a path between a stream and a meadow, Matt complimented some recent stories I’d written. I began to panic. Matt blogs about open data as part of his job at a Washington, D.C.-based non-profit, and I hadn’t read one of his posts since our last meeting. In fact, I hadn’t even read one of his tweets about his posts—or, it occurred to me,…
  • Book Reviews in 100 Words or Less: ‘Happiness by Design: Change What You Do, Not What You Think’

    Footnotes
    16 Sep 2014 | 7:12 am
    Happiness by Design: Change What You Do, Not What You Think Paul Dolan Hudson Street Press Economist Paul Dolan proposes that happiness is a balance of pleasant feelings and a sense of purpose. He is confident in telling us several things to do to improve ourselves: eat from smaller dishes to fool ourselves into satiety; insert inspiring slogans into our email passwords to subtly boost our self-esteem; broadcast weight-loss goals to friends to keep ourselves faithful to our diets. Since we can’t will ourselves into happiness, Dolan urges us to take care in setting up what we can control.
  • 3-D Movies Aren’t That Special

    Nathan Collins
    16 Sep 2014 | 6:12 am
    In theory, three-dimensional video heightens the emotional impact of a movie scene—imagine if that guy from My Bloody Valentine appeared to be swinging his pickaxe straight at you, or if The Polar Express swooped out of the screen and just narrowly avoided running over your popcorn. Pretty exciting, huh? Perhaps, but psychologists—who are a bit more even-tempered about the latest technology and a bit less interested in your wallet, compared with movie producers—say otherwise in a recent study. Though movie makers might well take note, Daniel Bride, Sheila Crowell and five others at the…
  • What Color Is Your Pygmy Goat?

    Brendan Borrell
    16 Sep 2014 | 6:00 am
    The moment you set eyes upon Only Imagine’s two kids, you will want to pick them up, cradle them in your arms, and sing them goat lullabies. They have black socks, pointy white ears, and white muzzles. Their legs are stumpy. Their eyes, which are button-round, have an earnest look of terror. Since they are pygmy goats, they will grow to a height of only two feet and a weight of 80 pounds, a third of the size of an ordinary goat. Their names are Imagine and Imagine That. And they are caught up in an unlikely war over breeding. It’s farm day here at the Proverbial Pygmies ranch, a…
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    ProPublica: Articles and Investigations

  • Old Debts, Fresh Pain: Weak Laws Offer Debtors Little Protection

    ProPublica
    16 Sep 2014 | 3:00 am
    by Paul Kiel, ProPublica, and Chris Arnold, NPR, This story was co-published with NPR. Like any American family living paycheck to paycheck, Conrad Goetzinger and Cassandra Rose hope that if they make the right choices, their $13-an-hour jobs will keep the lights on, put food in the fridge and gas in the car. Debt Collection Stories We asked readers to tell us about their experiences being sued over debt. Here are a few of their stories » Have you been pursued by debt collectors? Share your story here. But every two weeks, the Omaha, Neb. couple is reminded of a choice they didn't make…
  • Confession of Etan Patz’s Accused Killer Finally Aired in Court

    ProPublica
    15 Sep 2014 | 1:56 pm
    by Joe Sexton For more about the disappearance of 6-year-old Etan Patz, a case that frustrated and mystified police for decades, read the story ProPublica produced with WNYC in 2013 Stan Patz, back straight, betraying no outward emotion, sat in a Manhattan courtroom on Monday and for the first time listened to someone confessing to killing his 6-year-old son Etan. Pedro Hernandez, a former bodega clerk in the SoHo neighborhood where the Patz family lived in 1979, said he randomly encountered Etan on the street one morning as he made his way to the store's basement. Hernandez, in a taped…
  • Podcast: In Big Tobacco Cash, a Boon Turned Burden

    ProPublica
    15 Sep 2014 | 9:19 am
    by Nicole Collins Bronzan Remember the landmark Big Tobacco settlement in 1998 that awarded state and local governments billions of dollars a year to reimburse them for the health-care costs of smoking? It seemed a boon then, but as Cezary Podkul tells ProPublica Editor in Chief Steve Engelberg in today’s podcast, things haven’t exactly turned out that way. Podkul’s reporting shows that what many state and local governments did with the money – using bonds to trade away the tobacco income decades into the future in exchange for cash upfront – has meant growing…
  • Unseen Toll: Wages of Millions Seized to Pay Past Debts

    ProPublica
    15 Sep 2014 | 3:00 am
    by Paul Kiel, ProPublica, and Chris Arnold, NPR, This story was co-published with NPR. Back in 2009, Kevin Evans was one of millions of Americans blindsided by the recession. His 25-year career selling office furniture collapsed. He shed the nice home he could no longer afford, but not a $7,000 credit card debt. Debt Collection Stories We asked readers to tell us about their experiences being sued over debt. Here are a few of their stories » Have you been pursued by debt collectors? Share your story here. After years of spotty employment, Evans, 58, thought he'd finally recovered last…
  • Getting Sued Over Debt: Readers Tell Their Stories

    ProPublica
    15 Sep 2014 | 2:59 am
    Debt collection has undergone an aggressive makeover in recent years, with more creditors and collectors going to court to win judgments against consumers, often seizing hundreds of dollars from each paycheck. To find out more about these seizures, we asked ADP, the nation’s largest payroll services provider, for information on the 2013 payroll records for 13 million employees. ADP found that more than one in 10 employees in the prime working ages of 35 to 44 had their wages garnished in 2013. Roughly half of these debtors, unsurprisingly, owed child support. But a sizable number had…
 
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    MilitaryReporter.net

  • Navy releases retention study; LCS, F-35 get negative reviews

    Isaac Cubillos
    3 Sep 2014 | 8:05 am
    The Navy released its 2014 Retention Study to better understand the current perceptions of U.S. Navy sailors. Specifically, what impacts their decision-making when deciding to remain in uniformed service or to seek employment elsewhere? The study also sought to understand the three core areas underpinning a sailor’s perception of the quality of service they experience, […]
  • Register today for 2014 MRE Conference

    Isaac Cubillos
    26 Aug 2014 | 5:00 am
    The Pentagon’s new ethics adviser, Rear Adm. Margaret DeLuca “Peg” Klein, will give the keynote address at the 2014 Military Reporters & Editors Conference to be held Friday, Oct. 3, 2014 at The Army Navy Club, in downtown Washington, D.C. Klein was named special adviser to the Secretary of Defense for military professionalism, earlier this […]
  • War reporter accused of plagiarism

    Isaac Cubillos
    16 Jun 2014 | 5:09 am
    Christopher Hedges, author of several books and articles, covering war has been accused of plagiarism. An article in the New Republic outlines Hedges’s plagiarism in an article he submitted to Harper’s Magazine which was rejected. The New Republic’s article also points to plagiarism in Hedges’s book on the psychological effects of combat “War Is a […]
  • Daughter of famous WWII paratrooper completes story of D-Day

    Isaac Cubillos
    24 May 2014 | 7:53 am
    As a young boy, I lived in an area where I was surrounded by veterans of World War II. At the time, I got to hear their “war stories.” Sometimes, they reminded me of the old B-movies with the John Wayne-like hero charging onto the beaches. Navy Cmdr. “Happy” Blake would recall his story of […]
  • ‘Saving South Sudan’ an intelligent summary of what makes the country tick

    Stephanie Chenault
    13 May 2014 | 9:46 am
    Violence and bloodshed can never have morally good results – The Tragedy of Julius Caesar, William Shakespeare “Saving South Sudan” is an ambitious, multimedia event from “World’s Most Dangerous Places,” author Robert Young Pelton and master photographer/filmmaker, Tim Freccia. VICE went big on Pelton’s quixotic journey with Nuer Lost Boy Machot Lap Thiep to “fix” […]
 
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    SixEstate

  • Brand Journalism, Then and Now

    Katie McCaskey
    15 Sep 2014 | 4:00 am
    “Brand journalism is not brand-centric, but a brand journalist’s job includes figuring out how to seamlessly weave in a brand presence.” That’s Tip #6 in this chipper video about the “now” of branded, err, make that un-branded content. Marketing professionals are increasingly accepting that un-branded content is the way forward. As summarized by MediaSource, the makers of this video: [We can] expand your story by developing meaningful content and delivering real journalism that can be leveraged across both company-owned and earned media. Evolution of Brand…
  • Like-Gating and SSL: Changes Loom From Google and Facebook

    George Williams
    9 Sep 2014 | 4:00 am
    Planning a Facebook promotion to increase your likes? You may want to do some research first. Facebook has updated developer policies and is implementing a ban on incentives to like a Facebook page. Here are the paragraphs of note: You must not incentivize people to use social plugins or to like a Page. This includes offering rewards, or gating apps or app content based on whether or not a person has liked a Page. It remains acceptable to incentivize people to login to your app, checkin at a place or enter a promotion on your app’s Page. To ensure quality connections and help businesses…
  • ‘Journopreneurs,’ Native Advertising, and Brand Journalism

    Katie McCaskey
    7 Aug 2014 | 4:00 am
    Native advertising? Shouldn’t there be a more politically correct term for it? As a John Oliver fan (see: net neutrality), I was pleased to discover he recently covered “native advertising.” I favor Oliver’s researched comedy and was eager to see his take on it. In his sketch, “native content” refers to both overt product placement and less transparent sponsored material. Or, in a phrase, “corporate influence.” As Jason Abbruzzese summarizes: “Many critics argue, as Oliver does, that at best native advertising is a form of trickery and at…
  • A Social Media Toolkit

    George Williams
    4 Aug 2014 | 4:00 am
    These days there are so many different platforms — blogs, Twitter, Facebook, etc. — that managing them all without assistance can be massively cumbersome. Today I’m going to take a look at some of the key tools that can help you administer your online communications campaign. BuzzSumo — This dandy little tool lets you look at the most shared links on various social networks as well as the influencers for specific topics on those platforms. It covers Google+ shares, Facebook likes, LinkedIn shares, and Twitter shares. It’s available at everyone’s favorite…
  • Brand Journalism: Not the Worst Job in America

    Katie McCaskey
    30 Jul 2014 | 4:00 am
    If you had a choice: would you rather work as a lumberjack or as enlisted military personnel? These two occupations sandwich the occupation of “newspaper reporter,” which a 2014 survey declared “Now Only Second Worst Job in America!” Reporters got the short end of the ranking stick because, as Tina Nguyen summarizes, they make “on average, $37,090 a year, and also report absurdly high levels of stress, terrible work environments, and poor hiring outlooks.” So what’s a journalist to do? One option is to buy access to a guide to tell you all about…
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    Joe Gullo

  • Experts: Ebola Cases Could Reach More Than 200K by Year’s End

    Joe Gullo
    15 Sep 2014 | 5:54 pm
    New projections from health experts show the potential for the current Ebola outbreak to reach more than 200,000 cases by the end of the year. Columbia University’s Prediction of Infectious Disease modeled the current outbreak data from the World Health Organization (WHO) to try and predict how many cases and deaths we could see from the disease over the next few weeks. Researchers modeled three of the following scenarios: An improved scenario: intervention and containment are more effective in the future A no change scenario: intervention and containment continues with the same…
  • Sally Kohn: Don’t Like Clickbait? Don’t Click

    Joe Gullo
    15 Sep 2014 | 6:31 am
    We’ve all came across websites and social media accounts where posts try to lure us into clicking on them. This is often referred to as click-baiting. Many social networks rank posts that just try to get you to click on them lower than posts that actively try to engage people in conversation. I came across an interesting TED Talk this morning on how click-baiting is damaging our culture. Sally Kohn says that clicking is a public act and that in order to stop it, you must stop clicking on these links. Here’s the video to the full talk: As a digital media specialist, I always try…
  • How the Apple Watch Will Change How We Communicate

    Joe Gullo
    14 Sep 2014 | 9:13 am
    Apple isn’t the first company to release a smart watch, but the Apple Watch will change the way we communicate with one another. The days of wrist-staring while walking down the street is coming, soon. The one feature that I think stands out the most is the sense of touch. Feeling calls, messages, notifications, and even our own or someone else’s heartbeat. This adds a “personal touch”. No one else in the market has a similar feature. The traditional form of digital communication like texting and making phone calls will still be the foundation of communication on the…
  • VT Fall Foliage Report – 9/13/14

    Joe Gullo
    13 Sep 2014 | 10:47 am
    The Vermont fall foliage report for 9/13/14. Each Saturday, until the end of the season, I’ll be recording and taking photos of the fall foliage season in Vermont. Follow the Fall Foliage 2014 tag to see all my photographs of the fall foliage season. Isolated change, with most change in the higher elevations in northern VT While there have been some isolated trees in the Champlain Valley that lost leaves or changed colors, the vast majority of trees are unchanged. According to the Vermont Department of Tourism, the areas seeing the most change right now is the higher elevations in…
  • Where Enterovirus D68 is in the United States

    Joe Gullo
    13 Sep 2014 | 7:33 am
    The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and state health departments around the country are currently tracking a respiratory illness called enterovirus D68 (EV-D68). So far, 104 people in 10 states have confirmed cases of EV-D68. The CDC says some state laboratories may have also confirmed cases, but these were not included in the total case count. Infants, children, and teenagers are most a risk to get infected with enteroviruses, the CDC says. That’s because they haven’t built up immunity from previous exposures. The CDC believes that is also the case with EV-D68.
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    The Hungry and Foolish

  • iPhone 6 Pre-orders Set Record, Top Four Million in First 24 Hours

    Kevin Wild
    15 Sep 2014 | 7:05 pm
    Apple® today announced a record number of first day pre-orders of iPhone® 6 and iPhone 6 Plus, the biggest advancements in iPhone history, with over four million in the first 24 hours. Demand for the new iPhones exceeds the initial pre-order supply and while a significant amount will be delivered to customers beginning on Friday and throughout September, many iPhone pre-orders are scheduled to be delivered in October. Additional supply of iPhone 6 and iPhone 6 Plus will be available to walk-in customers on Friday, September 19 at 8:00 a.m. local time at Apple retail stores.Not a bad…
  • Tim Cook's Charlie Rose Interview

    Kevin Wild
    15 Sep 2014 | 7:02 pm
    Great interview, well worth watching.Permalink
  • ☆ Thoughts on the iPhone 6 and 6 Plus

    Kevin Wild
    13 Sep 2014 | 12:25 pm
    Despite being the highest-selling product in Apple's lineup, less than 30% of Tuesday's keynote was spent discussing the major changes to the iPhone. Tim Cook wasn't lying when he said it's the "biggest change" of the iPhone since the original. It also happens to be literally the biggest iPhone Apple's ever made. Now, none of this comes as much of a surprise considering the numerous leaks leading up to the announcement (and the fact I predicted these changes a week earlier). Despite predicting some of these changes, I have a few thoughts I'd like to share. iPhone 6As expected,…
  • How Bad Is The U2 Album Apple Forced On Everyone?

    Kevin Wild
    11 Sep 2014 | 7:28 pm
    A culmination of negative reviews for the new U2 album by The Verge:Now, we'll admit, this list is somewhat cherry picked.This sentence is the only bit of truth in this crap article.Permalink
  • 6 or 6 Plus?

    Kevin Wild
    11 Sep 2014 | 6:08 pm
    David Sparks from MacSparky:I printed the page, folded it around the 6 Plus size, and taped a stack of index cards to the back to give it the approximate thickness of the actual phone. I've carried it so far in my fancy work pants and my jeans. It fits fine in my pocket. I've set it in my car mount and it seems like the larger screen will not be a problem for me to carry around and a benefit when viewing. In addition to giving me some idea of whether or not the 6 Plus will work, walking around with a paper phone in my pocket has provided my family a seemingly infinite amount of…
 
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