Journalism

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  • Gawker: The internet bully

    Columbia Journalism Review
    24 Oct 2014 | 1:49 pm
    Earlier this week Gawker lost "thousands of dollars" in advertising after a poorly worded tweet was posted by one of its writers. Sam Biddle, one of the more sarcastic employees among the sarcastic throng at Gawker Media, tweeted out a joke: Ultimately #GamerGate is reaffirming what we've known to be true for decades: nerds should be constantly shamed and degraded...
  • Girls Who Code

    Open
    By Priya Ollapally
    24 Oct 2014 | 7:40 am
    Miranda Chaiken, Aida Piccato and Sunnam Quispe are seniors at Stuyvesant High School and the creators of NYC Happenings. Their site, which guides users to events, is powered by The New York Times Event Listings API and searchable by genre and borough. They explained that they found themselves doing the same activities every day and decided to build a functional website as a cure for their boredom. While all three have taken computer science classes at Stuyvesant’s prestigious computer science program, they attended the Girls Who Code Club at Twitter’s headquarters to hone their…
  • A Radio Revolution: Radiotopia Announces 3 New Shows and Hits Kickstarter Goal

    20 headlines from the reading list
    23 Oct 2014 | 8:00 am
    For podcasters, it’s been a busy month of fundraising. First, “Snap Judgment,” reached their fundraising goal to produce the best next season ever and then, this Tuesday, Radiotopia reached their Kickstarter goal with 23 days left to go. Maybe it really is a radio revolution — centered on good storytelling and journalism. PRX has estimated that it takes about 50,000 core subscribers to ensure a podcast will be of interest to sponsors and pay its staff. By relying on listener support, philanthropy, and subscriptions, Radiotopia has grown substantially since its launch…
  • Building trust in news

    BuzzMachine
    Jeff Jarvis
    25 Oct 2014 | 1:19 pm
    In their Trust Project, Richard Gingras, head of Google News, and Sally Lehrman, a fellow at the Markkula Center for Applied Ethics, argue the need to rebuild trust in news and they propose a set of practical tactics. I want to suggest further steps to support their campaign. The reforms Gingrich and Lehrman propose: * News organizations and journalists should craft and publish statements of mission and ethics. * Journalists should disclose their background to reveal both levels of expertise and areas of personal interest and conflict. * For disclosure and accountability (and credit,…
  • Mike Huckabee: My Fox News Show Helps Me For 2016

    Media Matters for America - Latest Items
    24 Oct 2014 | 8:50 am
    Potential 2016 presidential candidate Mike Huckabee says his Fox News platform is helping him in the crucial primary state of Iowa. A Huckabee profile from Real Clear Politics (RCP) documents the Fox host's recent trip to Iowa to support Republican Senate candidate Joni Ernst. According to reporter Scott Conroy, Huckabee was approached by several "Iowa Republican activists and volunteers" who told the Fox News host that they regularly watch his show. Huckabee reportedly cited his platform at the network with helping put him in a "very good place to be" as he…
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    Columbia Journalism Review

  • Gawker: The internet bully

    24 Oct 2014 | 1:49 pm
    Earlier this week Gawker lost "thousands of dollars" in advertising after a poorly worded tweet was posted by one of its writers. Sam Biddle, one of the more sarcastic employees among the sarcastic throng at Gawker Media, tweeted out a joke: Ultimately #GamerGate is reaffirming what we've known to be true for decades: nerds should be constantly shamed and degraded...
  • What's next for Ferguson?

    24 Oct 2014 | 1:42 pm
    The story of Ferguson, MO, roils on. On Tuesday, the St. Louis Post-Dispatch published Michael Brown’s leaked autopsy report, and The New York Times and Washington Post featured unnamed sources implying that a grand jury may accept police officer Darren Wilson’s account of the confrontation which left Brown dead. Fresh protests of over 200 people followed outside the Ferguson Police Department, as well...
  • Must-reads of the week

    24 Oct 2014 | 12:50 pm
    Culled from CJR's own stories, plus the frequently updated "Must-reads from around the Web," our staff recommendations for the best pieces of journalism (and other miscellany) on the internet, here are your can't-miss must-reads of the past week: The ethics of The Guardian's Whisper bombshell (CJR) - "It was bizarre to see a bit of backlash develop against The Guardian...
  • Is it ever okay to name victims?

    24 Oct 2014 | 9:00 am
    In 1990, The Des Moines Register took the rare step of naming a rape victim in a series that won the following year's Pulitzer Prize for public service. The Pulitzer committee wrote that the series prompted "widespread reconsideration of the traditional media practice of concealing the identity of rape victims." The series, about Nancy Ziegenmeyer's rape and her subsequent experiences...
  • The biggest threat to press rights may be a failure to understand them

    24 Oct 2014 | 4:50 am
    It’s a cliché to say so, but we’re at a moment of transition for American journalism. The digital disruption that has challenged the newspaper industry and other legacy publishers has also created opportunities for independent journalists and startup news organizations. And the disruption has implications for the legal landscape in which journalism is produced, as new platforms and questions emerge....
 
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    BuzzMachine

  • Building trust in news

    Jeff Jarvis
    25 Oct 2014 | 1:19 pm
    In their Trust Project, Richard Gingras, head of Google News, and Sally Lehrman, a fellow at the Markkula Center for Applied Ethics, argue the need to rebuild trust in news and they propose a set of practical tactics. I want to suggest further steps to support their campaign. The reforms Gingrich and Lehrman propose: * News organizations and journalists should craft and publish statements of mission and ethics. * Journalists should disclose their background to reveal both levels of expertise and areas of personal interest and conflict. * For disclosure and accountability (and credit,…
  • Oh, those Germans

    Jeff Jarvis
    23 Oct 2014 | 7:04 am
    German publishers warring with Google — and the link and the internet — have now completed their humiliation at their own hands, capitulating to Google and allowing it to continue quoting and linking to them. How big of them. The pathetic sequence of their fight: 1. German publishers under the banner of a so-called trade group called VG Media and led by conservative publisher Axel Springer called in who knows what political chits to get legislators to create a new, ancillary copyright law — the Leistungsschutzrecht — to forbid Google et al from quoting even snippets to…
  • Inside an entrepreneur’s sausage factory

    Jeff Jarvis
    29 Sep 2014 | 9:16 am
    I will be assigning all my entrepreneurial journalism students to listen to every episode of Alex Blumberg’s podcast about starting a podcast company. It is an open, honest, true portrayal of the making of an entrepreneur. Blumberg, you’ll recall, was a producer and voice on This American Life and one of the geniuses — along with NPR economic correspondent Adam Davidson — behind its Giant Pool of Money and then their podcast and blog Planet Money. He decided to pick up and start a new company to produce quality, journalistic podcasts because he wisely saw the…
  • A most cynical letter from a most cynical company

    Jeff Jarvis
    17 Sep 2014 | 3:53 pm
    Robert Thomson, CEO of News Corp., just sent a monumentally cynical letter to the EU attacking Google, matching the letter from a posse of European publishers led by Germany’s Axel Springer and another public letter from that company’s head, Mathia Döpfner. These supposed bastions of conservative thinking are running to the government they all disdain to try to get unfair advantage on Google because — simply put — they have failed in the marketplace on their own. The internet and defeated them. They are crying uncle. On Newsgenius, I annotated Thomson’s…
  • Technoeuropanic

    Jeff Jarvis
    4 Sep 2014 | 6:23 pm
    Europe is at it again. Or still. I’m told that a consortium of European publishers will run an ad in European papers this weekend attacking Google and the EU’s antitrust deal with the company. It’s the same old stuff: publishers whining and stomping their feet that it’s just not fair that Google is doing better than they are and government should step in to do something about this, this damned, uh … competitor. In the ad, the publishers’ argument is that Google’s search is not “impartial.” First, who said it has to be? Second, Google does…
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    Media Matters for America - Latest Items

  • Mike Huckabee: My Fox News Show Helps Me For 2016

    24 Oct 2014 | 8:50 am
    Potential 2016 presidential candidate Mike Huckabee says his Fox News platform is helping him in the crucial primary state of Iowa. A Huckabee profile from Real Clear Politics (RCP) documents the Fox host's recent trip to Iowa to support Republican Senate candidate Joni Ernst. According to reporter Scott Conroy, Huckabee was approached by several "Iowa Republican activists and volunteers" who told the Fox News host that they regularly watch his show. Huckabee reportedly cited his platform at the network with helping put him in a "very good place to be" as he…
  • Allen West On Ottawa Attack: "Shut Down" Mosques Of Perpetrators And Deport The Imams

    24 Oct 2014 | 8:13 am
    Fox News contributor Allen West believes the Western world should respond to the Ottawa terrorist attack by shutting down "the mosques and Islamic Centers where these individuals are attending" and deporting the imams. West added that closing these places "of so-called worship" is "the only way we send a message into the Muslim communities" that we're "not going to tolerate these snake pits of sedition." West was speaking on the October 23 edition of BlogTalkRadio's REELTalk. Here's his reaction to the Ottawa attack: WEST: But I think, Audrey, the real thing…
  • After Dodging Iowa Press, Joni Ernst Retreats To Fox News

    24 Oct 2014 | 8:01 am
    After spending weeks avoiding interviews with Iowa newspaper editorial boards who threatened to ask substantive policy questions, Iowa Republican Senate candidate Joni Ernst took refuge on Fox News, where hosts lavished her with uncritical praise. Ernst has recently come under fire after cancelling or declining meetings with the editorial boards of major Iowa newspapers. Staff at key Iowa papers told Media Matters that Ernst's recent avoidance of them is nearly unprecedented and pointed to the importance of local papers as forum for candidates "to explain one's positions" to voters in her…
  • Mark Levin Says Eric Holder Is Guilty Of "Hate Crimes, If You Will," In Ferguson, MO

    24 Oct 2014 | 7:57 am
    From the October 23 edition of Premiere Radio Networks' The Mark Levin Show.Previously:   Conservative Media Race-Baiting: Ferguson Edition Fox Chops Context From Clip To Claim Eric Holder Is "Picking A Side" In Ferguson Fox's Bolling Doubts Eric Holder Can "Be Fair And Balanced" On "A Race Case" Like Michael Brown Shooting
  • Ingraham: CO Senate Candidate Cory Gardner "Needs To Move Closer" To The Extreme Right On Immigration

    24 Oct 2014 | 7:30 am
    From the October 24 edition of Courtside Entertainment Group's The Laura Ingraham Show:Previously: Ingraham Urges Listeners: Support Senate Candidate Scott Brown "Right This Very Moment" Because He Opposes "Amnesty" Laura Ingraham Campaigned Against Eric Cantor To Push Her Perfect Anti-Immigrant Candidate To Victory Laura Ingraham: Advocating Immigration Reform Means "The End Of The Road" For Paul Ryan
 
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    Open

  • Girls Who Code

    By Priya Ollapally
    24 Oct 2014 | 7:40 am
    Miranda Chaiken, Aida Piccato and Sunnam Quispe are seniors at Stuyvesant High School and the creators of NYC Happenings. Their site, which guides users to events, is powered by The New York Times Event Listings API and searchable by genre and borough. They explained that they found themselves doing the same activities every day and decided to build a functional website as a cure for their boredom. While all three have taken computer science classes at Stuyvesant’s prestigious computer science program, they attended the Girls Who Code Club at Twitter’s headquarters to hone their…
  • Real-World Development

    By Danielle Rothermel
    3 Sep 2014 | 8:02 am
    The New York Times continued our technology internship program this summer, and Danielle Rothermel, one of the interns in this year’s class, discusses what she learned. I’ve spent my summer learning new languages, platforms and frameworks, but before I get into that, let me share some background about myself. After a frustrating and failed attempt to learn how to use the command prompt in middle school, I went into my freshman year of college adamant that I would take my required Introduction to Programming class and be done with computer science forever. However, I soon found out…
  • Getting Groovy With Reactive Android

    By Mohit Pandey
    18 Aug 2014 | 11:16 am
    “Slow,” a word no one ever wants to see associated with their app. Delay and lag of as little as 100–200 milliseconds will be perceived by users as poor, slow performance. Keeping long running tasks on the main thread will result in that perception, the dreaded “Application Not Responding” (ANR) and a bad user experience. This leaves us developers one choice: concurrent execution of code. The recent growth in popularity of functional programming is well deserved. As things become more asynchronous, the functional model really fits well. Being able to sequence, chain and transform…
  • Build an Open Source Community Platform With New York Times, Washington Post and Mozilla

    By Greg Barber
    7 Aug 2014 | 12:18 pm
    Each year, Knight-Mozilla OpenNews selects developers, technologists, civic hackers and data crunchers to spend 10 months working as fellows embedded in their partner newsrooms. Fellowships are paid positions, and emphasize open source development that strengthens specific newsrooms and the larger journalism-code community. The search for the 2015 Knight-Mozilla Fellows is now open, and the deadline for applications is Aug. 16, 2014. Staffers from The New York Times, Mozilla OpenNews and The Washington Post are seeking two fellows to join their community platform collaboration. This is their…
  • EMR Streaming in Go

    By JP Robinson
    10 Jul 2014 | 8:38 am
    On our platform teams, we use Amazon’s Elastic MapReduce (EMR) service to help us gather useful metrics from log files. We have processes that capture log files, then compress and push them to Amazon S3 for archiving. This pattern builds up massive amounts of information going back several years and, thanks to EMR, it’s all available to us for data crunching. Initially, we used Python for a lot of the heavy lifting, but over time we came to rely on Go. In the Beginning When we first started using EMR, my team wrote the mapper and reducer scripts in Python. We chose Python because it…
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    The Linchpen

  • Highlights from #cj2014 opening keynote: Jon Kleinberg

    Greg Linch
    24 Oct 2014 | 11:01 am
    I’m following the Computation + Journalism 2014 symposium via the hashtag and livestream. Below are some highlights I collected from the opening keynote. Storify by Greg Linch Fri, Oct 24 2014 17:15:36 Edit #cj2014: Tracing the Flow of On-Line Information through Networks and Text Keynote by Jon Kleinberg at 2014 Computation + Journalism symposium at Columbia University Event page: 2014 C+J Symposium We live in a society that is increasingly dependent on data and computation, a dependence that often evolves invisibly, without substantial critical assessment or accountability. Far from…
  • Images of inspiration: The visual genealogy of Kon, Jodorowsky and Friedrich

    Greg Linch
    16 Sep 2014 | 12:10 pm
    Watch this video essay by Tony Zhou about filmmaker and animator Satoshi Kon (h/t Robin Sloan on Snarkmarket). First off, Zhou’s piece is absolutely wonderful. One thing I find particularly fascinating is when you’re shown the original scene and a scene inspired by it — e.g. Inception and Black Swan. The documentary “Jodorowsky’s Dune,” which I watched last weekend thanks to Sandro Mairata, offers similar examples in the context of science fiction, which are mentioned near the end of the trailer (1:42) — e.g. Alien, Blade Runner and The Matrix. It…
  • Running for ONA board re-election

    Greg Linch
    8 Sep 2014 | 5:00 am
    [Update: I won a second term, yay! Congrats to everyone who was elected/re-elected!] It’s almost time for the ONA14 conference (yeah!) and that means another board election approaches. My first term on the board is almost complete and I’m running for re-election. It’s been an honor to serve on the board with such a wonderful and talented group of journalists. ONA continues to make great progress and I’d love to continue serving the members and the organization. If you’re a member (or not yet a member, you should join) — I’d greatly…
  • Block Chains for News

    Greg Linch
    17 Jul 2014 | 10:04 pm
    Anil Dash’s piece on applying an underlying concept of Bitcoin to track digital art has me thinking about the potential applications of  block chains for news. As he writes: What the technology behind Bitcoin enables, in short, is the ability to track online trading of a digital object, without relying on any one central authority, by using the block chain as the ledger of transactions. What if we built a block chain system for news? Recording and verifying facts, data, updates, quotes, people, etc like the Bitcoin protocol tracks transactions in a database that no one owns, but of…
  • Jorge Luis Borges on “the task of art”

    Greg Linch
    20 Apr 2014 | 2:21 pm
    “The task of art is to transform what is continuously happening to us, to transform all these things into symbols, into music, into something that can last in man’s memory. That is our duty. If we don’t fulfill it, we feel unhappy. A writer or any artist has the joyful duty to transform all that into symbols. These symbols could be colors, forms or sounds. For a poet, the symbols are sounds and also words, fables, stories, poetry. The work of a poet never ends. It has nothing to do with working hours. You are continuously receiving things from the external world. These must…
 
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    Mediashift

  • Daily Must Reads, October 24, 2014

    Julie Keck
    24 Oct 2014 | 9:07 am
    1. Why the New York Times built a tool for crowdsourced time travel (Justin Ellis / Nieman Lab) 2. Hong Kong: The difficult task of verifying news amidst censorship and social media (Jihii Jolly / Columbia Journalism Review) 3. Gamergate and how Internet users think about gaming and harassment (Alyssa Rosenberg / The Washington Post) 4. The laborers who keep NSFW pics and beheadings out of your Facebook feed (Adrian Chen / Wired) 5. Wanna see the latest new Yahoo home page, rolling out next month? (Kara Swisher / Re/code) 6. Electronic Frontier Foundation relaunches Surveillance Self-Defense…
  • A Student’s Perspective on High School Journalism in California

    Jackson Brook
    24 Oct 2014 | 3:00 am
    Click the image to see all the stories in our series Having survived my senior year at Palo Alto High School, I think I can safely say that thus far in my education, the most useful thing I have done to develop my intellectual vitality has been joining my high school magazine, Verde. Although most high schools focus solely on a yearbook or a newspaper, Paly (as my California-based school is called by both students and teachers alike) has indulged its journalism programs: We have not one but five news publications of different varieties. As a Paly student and a co-editor of Verde, I’ve had…
  • Mediatwits #135: HBO, CBS Jump into Streaming Services for Cord-Cutters

    Fannie Cohen
    24 Oct 2014 | 3:00 am
    Last week HBO and CBS both announced plans to offer stand-alone streaming services on the web. It’s a major turn-about for the pay cable service HBO (owned by Time Warner), which has long maintained they are “not TV.” This move will allow viewers to cut the cord to their cable TV subscriptions and purchase HBO programming alone. And even CBS has jumped into the streaming fold, announcing a live-streaming and on-demand subscription service. But since buying a cable subscription has long been the barrier to entry for premium networks such as HBO, does this move signal a coming mass exodus…
  • Media and Journalism Fellowships: October 2014 Edition

    Sonia Paul
    24 Oct 2014 | 3:00 am
    Here’s a list of current media and journalism fellowship programs, including deadline for applying. If we’re missing any major programs, please use our Contact Form to let us know, and we’ll add them to the list.  Featured Fellowship JoLT Fellowships @ American University American University invites applications for three JoLT (Journalism Leadership Transformation) fellowships in games and disruptive media. Fellows will participate in several leadership initiatives partnering American University, the John S. and James L. Knight Foundation and multiple nationally recognized industry…
  • Media and Journalism Awards: October 2014 Edition

    Sonia Paul
    24 Oct 2014 | 3:00 am
    Here’s a list of current media and journalism awards, including deadlines for applying. If we’re missing any major programs, please use our Contact Form to let us know, and we’ll add them to the list.  OCTOBER 2014 DEADLINES Webby Awards The Webby Awards honor the best of the web, from multimedia to digital journalism to interactive publishing to online campaigns. Deadline: October 24, 2014 NOVEMBER 2014 DEADLINES Bookmarks Awards Digital Media and Marketing Association The Bookmarks Awards, based in South Africa, honor excellence in digital work, from websites, app development and…
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    Digidave

  • My next adventure: AJ+

    Digidave
    10 Oct 2014 | 2:50 pm
    Before I go into the why, let’s not bury the lede. I am joining AJ+ as an Executive Producer. Specifically, I’ll be focusing on the app, engagement and social. It was not easy leaving Circa where I was the Chief Content Officer. As the first non-technical hire I helped set the editorial tone for where Circa is today. I couldn’t be more proud or excited for its future. I am also thankful to Matt, Ben, Arsenio and the entire Circa editorial team. I learned an enormous amount during my time there. Where does one go after working on a project like Circa? As I’ve said before,…
  • Enough with the manifestos about the future of news, let your product do the talking

    Digidave
    7 Oct 2014 | 10:45 pm
    Nikki Usher had a great Columbia Journalism Review article “Startup site manifestos are press criticism” where she notes that startup news orgs like PandoDaily, Vox, FiveThirtyEight and more have gotten into the habit of writing manifestos (much like the New York Times did when it launched in 1851). These manifestos are essentially their critique of the press in action. The implication is that traditional journalism simply doesn’t offer readers this kind of news in the existing environment—that it’s not doing enough to give us what we need to know, and these sites are going to offer…
  • 2015 SXSW Accelerator: Entry Deadline Nov. 7

    Digidave
    22 Sep 2014 | 6:00 am
    Once again I am humbled to be a SXSW Accelerator advisor. What is that? It’s the chance to showcase your startup  in front of industry leaders. From the organizers: “SXSW Accelerator returns for its seventh edition to showcase some of the web’s most exciting innovations – could your company be one?  This event provides an outlet for companies to present their new online entertainment or gaming products, social media / networking technologies, or mobile, news, music, or health technology to a panel of industry experts, early adopters, and representatives from the angel /…
  • Nothing is in a name when we attack industry tribes

    Digidave
    1 Aug 2014 | 1:43 pm
    There’s no need to defend “entrepreneurial journalism” because it doesn’t exist Is anyone else tired of pointless journalist on journalist attacks? They persist because of the labels/divisions we create amongst ourselves. Most of these labels are meaningless outside of our industry. It’s tribalism at its worst. In the end — we are on the same team. How different types of journalists see each other (From my most popular blog post ever) I did an eye-roll when I came across Corey Pein’s piece in the Baffler: “Amway Journalism.” The tl;dr version: He doesn’t like…
  • The San Francisco Public Press – the news nonprofit that could

    Digidave
    25 Jun 2014 | 2:37 pm
    I’m on the board of the San Francisco Public Press. I’ve been associated with them since the beginning and helped raise a ton of money for them while I was running Spot.Us. They currently have a Kickstarter up. They are past their original goal, but they have an opportunity to make more. If they get to 500 donors (even if the donor just gives $1) the Knight Foundation will contribute 5k over their Kickstarter goal. If they get to 750: they’ll throw in $7,500 and if they get to 1,000 contributors, even if they just give $1- the Knight Foundation will give them $10,000 over…
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    sans serif

  • ‘News TV covered Modi US trip like govt media’

    churumuri
    3 Oct 2014 | 4:50 am
    Like town criers in the old days, who arrived before the Maharaja and extolled his virtues, Indian news television reporters were in the United States even before prime minister Narendra Modi had set foot in God’s Own Country. And, over nearly a week, provided breathless coverage that left little to the imagination. Superman (or was it Spiderman) was interviewed at Times Square; Modi’s “rockstar” thanks-giving address to his NRI followers was shown ad nauseam; and all manner of policy wonks were rolled out to complete the circus. Business Standard has an editorial:…
  • ‘Being a South Indian, his Hindi was immaculate’

    churumuri
    18 Aug 2014 | 5:34 am
    sans serif records the demise of J.V. Raman, the Delhi University economics professor who read the news in Hindi, on Doordarshan, back in the days when the state-owned channel was the only TV news vehicle. Mr Raman taught at the capital’s Rajdhani College, whose website proudly records that he was among the college teachers associated with the media. A blog post on Doordarshan’s newsreaders recorded Mr Raman thus: “Let’s now come to some male Hindi newsreaders. And the most iconic of them would be J V Raman. Being a South Indian, his Hindi was immaculate. Thick…
  • Why NaMo shouldn’t take media on foreign trips

    churumuri
    13 Aug 2014 | 10:51 pm
    Prime Minister Manmohan Singh addresses the media on the way back home from the United States in October 2013. There were 34 journalists on that junket. As Indian journalists come to terms with a Narendra Modi dispensation that doesn’t want to court them or take them on foreign junkets, K.P. Nayar, the former Washington correspondent of The Telegraph, Calcutta, writes that the US administration is no better. Each correspondent who accompanied US president Barack Obama on his trip to India had to shell out $8,400 (approximately Rs 500,000) in air fare, plus an additional $2,500 (Rs…
  • India’s first woman journalist Vidya Munshi, RIP

    churumuri
    9 Jul 2014 | 4:59 am
    sans serif records the demise of Vidya Munshi, arguably India’s first woman journalist, in Calcutta on Monday, 7 July 2014.  She was 94 years old. Born in Bombay, she worked in several newspapers and magazines, including a ten-year stint with Russy Karanjia‘s Blitz. A 2006 profile of Ms Munshi in The Telegraph, Calcutta, noted: “At that time (1952-62), she was the Calcutta correspondent of Blitz, a Bombay weekly critical of government policies and excelling in investigative journalism. “One of her ‘scoops’ was on two Canadian pilots who were to fly from Hong Kong…
  • In ‘The Last Mag’, Nishant Patel is Fareed Zakaria

    churumuri
    2 Jul 2014 | 4:45 am
    DILIP CHAWARE writes from New Jersey: The Last Magazine is Michael Hastings’s novel which has been published a year after his death. This controversial young journalist, who worked for Newsweek as a war correspondent, died last year in a car accident in Los Angeles when he was just 33. Very few were aware about this book, which was resurrected from his laptop. The novel, though, is a portrayal of real life within a major news organisation, the nexus between the government and the media and broadly discusses the relevance and future of the print medium. Hastings is back in the news owing to…
 
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    Technology

  • Beyond parody: National Union of Students won't condemn the Islamic State

    Willard Foxton
    15 Oct 2014 | 8:50 am
    So, the other day, a Kurdish student attempted to get the National Union of Students to pass a motion condemning the "Islamic State". It's a pretty uncontroversial motion; after all, what Isil are doing on a day to day basis – the murders, the rapes, the imposition of slavery – is absolutely monstrous. Yet, the [...]
  • Five ways in which robots have already taken over the world without you noticing

    Willard Foxton
    7 Oct 2014 | 8:50 am
    If you’re over a certain age, you’ll remember the sort of future we were promised by the Jetsons, Dan Dare and Buck Rogers – flying cars, robot maids, everyday space travel. For a long time, it’s seemed that vision of the future was a total mirage; we thought we’d have robot butlers and got 140-character [...]
  • If the Met wants to deal with cyber crime then it can't simply chase headlines

    Willard Foxton
    1 Oct 2014 | 9:56 am
    Today, the Metropolitan Police officially launched a cyber crime task force under the preposterously macho name of “Operation Falcon”. The Met’s original cyber crime squad – with the much less catchy name the "Police Central e-crime Unit" – has been gobbled up by the new National Crime Agency. The launch of Falcon has been much [...]
  • Are you signing your life away?

    Willard Foxton
    30 Sep 2014 | 9:17 am
    When did anyone last bother reading a company's terms and conditions? The web security company F-Secure decided to find out by offering free WiFi in central London with one catch – the so-called “Herod clause”. Buried deep in legal jargon, the terms of service said that if you wanted to get a decent internet connection [...]
  • Joy Twitter row: Offensive and ignorant bigotry does not count as ‘irreverence’

    Chris Owen
    22 Sep 2014 | 2:17 am
    On Saturday night, the social media team looking after online retailer Joy's Twitter account saw fit to respond to a legitimate complaint from a customer about what she thought an offensive card for those suffering from bipolar, by replying: “then if you know someone with bipolar disorder, don’t buy it for them. PROBLEM SOLVED”. The [...]
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    Idea Lab

  • Launch and Learn: Lessons in Multimedia Training

    Barrett Golding
    24 Oct 2014 | 3:00 am
    This post is a follow-up to the Idea Lab article “The Shape of Learning: How Media Consumers Become Media Producers,” based on experiments and observations in the TOW (Transom Online Workshop). We can improve the journalism industry by improving journalism: Create stories that consistently win hearts and minds, stir souls, engage brains. How do we produce better stories and better storytellers worldwide? One way is better online journalism education. What’s needed isn’t revolutionary change — it’s evolutionary adaptation, building on successful…
  • What Are Digital Rights After Death in the Networked Age?

    Willow Brugh
    21 Oct 2014 | 3:00 am
    Early this year, yet another friend of mine up and died. There was of course a mess of things that had to be figured out. It wasn’t just the traditional things of cleaning out her house (I wasn’t around for that part) or figuring out the funeral (Viking in variety). It was the new and interesting technical and moral turmoil of getting into her hard drive, questions of “should we even?” — her prolific music and authoring contributions rivaled by her extreme privacy. It was seeking the edges of her far-flung pockets of Internet community to notify them personally, racing the…
  • 8 Projects Receive Funding to Spur Innovation in News Non-Profits

    Desiree Everts
    17 Oct 2014 | 3:00 am
    How do non-profit newsrooms become sustainable in the digital age? That’s the tricky question the INNovation Fund seeks to address by funding ideas that spur experimentation and innovation in non-profit newsrooms. The Investigative News Network has announced eight winners of the second round of its INNovation Fund, a partnership between the Knight Foundation and INN. The eight projects, which range from a film festival to a mobile app, have been awarded a total of $226,020. Each project will receive $35,000 or less. The winners include 100Reporters, Carolina Public Press, Citizens…
  • Knight Prototype Fund Winners: Storytelling, Data, Secure Internet and More

    Desiree Everts
    15 Oct 2014 | 10:38 am
    The Knight Foundation today announced the latest winners of its Knight Prototype Fund. Eighteen projects will receive $35,000 to help them bring their concepts closer to fruition. The fund, launched in 2012, also gives winners a support network and the opportunity to receive human-centered design training in an effort bring early stage media ideas to a formal launch. Several of this round’s winners include tools to help journalists enhance storytelling, including Creative Commons, which is developing a mobile app that lets users share photos through a public repository on the Internet…
  • Lessons Learned in Building Image-Comparison Tool JuxtaposeJS

    Alex Duner
    14 Oct 2014 | 3:00 am
    This post originally appeared on Northwestern University Knight Lab’s blog. Just in time for last month’s Online News Association Conference, Knight Lab announced the launch of JuxtaposeJS, a lightweight, easy-to-use, image comparison tool. Any product launch is exciting, and I’m excited to see how journalists use JuxtaposeJS to tell stories. But from a personal perspective JuxtaposeJS is more than just a tool — it’s the first tool I’ve ever built from start to finish. It was also my first major Javascript project, and I learned a few things during its development. I’m…
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    New Assignment Health Magazine

  • 5 Benefits Of Vitamin C For Skin

    Admin
    16 Oct 2014 | 9:07 am
    Some of the best selling skin care products contain Vitamin C. This vitamin is best known for protecting the skin from sun rays and revitalizing it. There are other manifold advantages of the vitamin for your skin. The top 5 benefits of it are discussed below. Sun Protection One of the foremost benefits of Vitamin C for your skin is that it protects the skin from sun damage, smoke and air pollution. The Vitamin contains potent antioxidant that protects your skin from sunlight exposure. Also, this substance limits sun burns which are caused as a result of exposure to UV radiation. People who…
  • A Beginners Guide to Getting a Nose Job

    Admin
    9 Jun 2014 | 11:52 am
    A nose job is a very popular cosmetic surgery that is acquired by a person in order to fix any deformity in the nose. Things like crooked nose, long, small, big or any other deformity can easily be fixed with modern rhinoplasty surgery. But before you go through the process of getting a nose job, there are several things you should know. Your doctor will usually discuss these things with you but it is always a good idea to go prepared so you can ask your doctor all the questions that come to mind. First of all it is important to know what a nose job can fix for you. Following is a list of…
  • The Beginners Guide To Electronic Cigarettes

    Admin
    28 Apr 2014 | 9:01 am
    Electronic cigarettes are pen shaped electronic devices that are growing in popularity. The electronic cigarette was developed by a Chinese pharmacist who launched this product in China initially. They got very famous in China and hence were introduced in major parts of the world. The Law and smoking It is not a hidden truth that governments generate billions of dollars in taxes from the sale of cigarettes. As traditional cigarettes are regulated by the government, the tax on tobacco is applicable on them. The downside however is that smoking causes thousands of death each year. Nowadays,…
  • How Microdermabrasion Cleansers Work

    Admin
    28 Apr 2014 | 7:33 am
    MicroDermabrasion is a relatively new skin care technique that has reach the hands of common people straight from Hollywood. It can be called an instant facelift technique that is an excellent alternative to painful and costly procedures such as Botox injections, plastic surgery and other chemical face peels. Since the arrival of this new and unique technique, more and more people are using the technique over traditional methods such as plastic surgery. More About MicroDermabrasion MicroDermabrasion, in simple words is a term given to applying small rough grains on the skin that buffs the…
  • Why Vaping Is Frowned Upon in the Work Place

    Admin
    25 Apr 2014 | 6:34 am
    My last update talked about what exactly is an electronic cigarette? Now that you know, I’m going to delve into a subject many people are dealing with in Corporate America – E-Cigs at work. Ecigs were initially popularized as being safe to smoke inside the office so that corporate workers didn’t have to leave meeting rooms and workplaces in order to go out and smoke. Recently however some laws are stopping this from happening and soon the example shall be set for restaurants as well. There are a few reasons why the indoor vaping trend could not last and the chief reason is that…
 
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    Reflections of a Newsosaur

  • Mobile news consumption hits the tipping point

    Newsosaur
    9 Oct 2014 | 5:00 am
    The proportion of mobile visits at digital newspaper sites has doubled in the last two years to the point that half the visitors at some publications today are arriving via smartphone or tablet.  The rapid uptake in mobile news consumption represents a tipping point that could be as disruptive a paradigm shift for newspapers as the move from print to pixels. Here’s why the shift has historical
  • Why do Sunday newspapers cost so much?

    Newsosaur
    10 Sep 2014 | 5:00 am
    As I picked up the Sunday New York Times at a Starbucks in a leafy neighborhood in Chicago, the twenty-something woman behind the counter started to ring up $2.99, the going rate for the Sunday Chicago Tribune.“Actually,” I said, “it’s $6.”“It is?” she said incredulously.“Yeah,” said the youthful male colleague beside her. “Why would anyone spend that kind of money for a newspaper?” “Well, the
  • Get ready for mobile payments

    Newsosaur
    8 Sep 2014 | 5:00 am
    Although wide-screen iPhones and curvy iWatches have gained the most attention as the buzz builds around Apple’s product announcement on Tuesday, the biggest game changer of all may be the company’s effort to launch a mobile payments system.  Assuming the chatter is correct, Apple will seek to supplant credit cards with a wireless payment system embedded in its next-gen gizmos, thus
  • How digital retailing could roil local media

    Newsosaur
    13 Aug 2014 | 5:00 am
    Thanks to the growing ubiquity of mobile devices, a digital revolution is about to transform bricks-and-mortar retailing – a fast-breaking phenomenon that potentially poses the biggest challenge yet to the economics of local media companies.  More than four out of five smartphone and tablet owners use their devices for shopping, according to a report issued earlier this year by the Nielsen
  • Are newspapers doomed? It depends.

    Newsosaur
    7 Aug 2014 | 1:12 pm
    Now that every major media company has dumped or soon will jettison its print division, the question I hear every day is: Are newspapers doomed? The answer is neither simple nor universal. But the dramatic and traumatic contraction of the newspaper industry in the last decade suggests that the business models, publishing platforms and journalistic conventions that seemed so stable and certain a
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    20 headlines from the reading list

  • Just Vote Already! How One Newsroom is Encouraging People to Vote in the Midterm Elections

    24 Oct 2014 | 8:09 am
    I may be a bit of a public radio fan girl, especially when it comes to New York’s WNYC and the Brian Lehrer Show. I’m not going to apologize for this. Because they do really fun, smart things in their newsroom. This fall, they’re taking on the midterm elections. A lot of pundits and newspeople will tell you that the scariest thing about midterm elections is that no one even knows there are elections in the first place. And isn’t our job as journos to inform the electorate? The Brian Lehrer team is taking that seriously, especially since there’s a district in the…
  • Israeli Tech Start-up Spot.IM Enables Publishers To Turn Visitors Into a Community

    24 Oct 2014 | 6:00 am
    The creators of Tel Aviv-based Spot.IM say that their free platform, now currently in Beta, can turn any website into its own social network, thus greatly diminishing the need and reliance on external, social media giants such as Facebook, Twitter and countless others. (more…) New Career Opportunities Daily: The best jobs in media.
  • Interieur 2014

    24 Oct 2014 | 4:32 am
    On Tuesday I took a little road trip to something I always look forward to. It’s a biannual event that takes place at the Kortrijk Xpo. You could say it’s our 'Milan design week'. 24rd Biennale Kortrijk really has become the center of design thanks to the Biennale Interieur. This year marks the 24th edition since it all started in 1968. It’s 10 days with 40.000m² of design across 6 halls from 300 selected brands. There is also a side track (that premiered in 2012) that runs in the city center on the Buda island where you can find the Budalab, Ventura Interieur platform and the expo…
  • A Radio Revolution: Radiotopia Announces 3 New Shows and Hits Kickstarter Goal

    23 Oct 2014 | 8:00 am
    For podcasters, it’s been a busy month of fundraising. First, “Snap Judgment,” reached their fundraising goal to produce the best next season ever and then, this Tuesday, Radiotopia reached their Kickstarter goal with 23 days left to go. Maybe it really is a radio revolution — centered on good storytelling and journalism. PRX has estimated that it takes about 50,000 core subscribers to ensure a podcast will be of interest to sponsors and pay its staff. By relying on listener support, philanthropy, and subscriptions, Radiotopia has grown substantially since its launch…
  • A Joan Didion Documentary Is in the Works

    22 Oct 2014 | 2:43 pm
    Griffin Dunne, nephew of famed journalist Joan Didion, launched a Kickstarter campaign today for a documentary of his aunt. Titled We Tell Ourselves Stories In Order to Live after that memorable first line out of Didion’s The White Album, the film will be the first and only documentary made about the writer. On its first day of funding, the Kickstarter campaign has already surpassed half of its $80,000 goal. Dunne is an Oscar-nominated director, and is partnering with director Susanne Rostock for the project. From their campaign page: (more…) New Career Opportunities Daily: The…
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    Poynter. » MediaWire

  • Internships cause plenty of hardship and woe

    Benjamin Mullin
    24 Oct 2014 | 1:51 pm
    Bad internships are like ill-fated summer romances: You go into them with an open heart and all the hope in the world, only to find out after three sizzling months they were using you the whole time. I’ve been fortunate in my fledgling career — and my love life — to steer clear of these summertime abusers. But like almost everyone working in journalism, I endured my fair share of harrowing situations while I was still figuring out which end of the pencil was up. In the hopes of finding comfort in shared misery, I sent out a few tweets yesterday looking to hear about your worst…
  • Canadian ban on printing Rehtaeh Parsons’ name extends to advertisements, family finds

    Ryan Van Horne
    24 Oct 2014 | 1:10 pm
    Canada won’t allow its journalists to print Rehtaeh Parsons’ name, because she was a victim of child pornography. That ban extends to advertising, too, one of Parsons’ family members has found, even if an ad only includes what could be considered an oblique reference to the court case that invoked the publication ban. Rehtaeh Parsons (Photograph courtesy Courtesy Glen Canning and Leah Parsons) Rehtaeh Parsons died last year, and last month a young man pleaded guilty to taking a photograph that led to her being bullied and tormented. But Nova Scotia media could only refer to the plea as…
  • The Globe rolls out red carpet for documentary film

    Benjamin Mullin
    24 Oct 2014 | 10:25 am
    This year, editors at The Boston Globe noticed that they shared something important with Hollywood’s biggest night: three directors, all trained at nearby Harvard University, each got Oscar nods for documentary filmmaking. That got the paper’s attention. Globe editors had known for awhile that New England was a hotbed for documentarians, with big names like Ken Burns and Errol Morris calling the region home. The arts staff, under film editor Janice Page, had long discussed expanding the paper’s coverage of documentary filmmaking; now they had a newspeg. Now, a few months…
  • From AIDS to Ebola: Journalism, disease, and the mentality of fear

    Roy Peter Clark
    24 Oct 2014 | 8:51 am
    I remember a day back in the 1980s when I first met a person who I thought had AIDS.  I was sitting at the front desk of the old storefront building of the Poynter Institute when a tall gaunt man entered through the glass doors and approached me with a question. I have forgotten his question, but I do remember being frightened by his appearance. He had several lesions on his face, the kind that people got after their immune system had been compromised by the AIDS virus. I did not reach out to shake his hand, my usual gesture, but babbled some reason to direct him out of the building. I am…
  • NBCUniversal settles intern lawsuit

    Andrew Beaujon
    24 Oct 2014 | 6:38 am
    Los Angeles Times NBCUniversal will pay $6.4 million to settle a class action lawsuit brought by former interns, Daniel Miller reports in the Los Angeles Times. The suit was originally brought last July by Jesse Moore and Monet Eliastam, who interned at MSNBC and “Saturday Night Live,” respectively, and “grew to include plaintiffs from other states,” Miller writes. Related: Poynter’s list of paid internships They’ll get “special bonuses,” and “a handful of plaintiffs would receive $2,000 to $10,000 each,” Miller writes. “Other…
 
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    SeanBlanda.com

  • 11 Fun Flag Facts You Didn’t Know

    Blanda
    30 Sep 2014 | 8:21 pm
    One of my favorite parts of Philadelphia is the Ben Franklin Parkway (known to you tourists as the street Rocky runs up approaching the Art Museum steps). There, over 90 national flags hang and when I lived in Philadelphia it was always fun to guess which one was which. Since then, I’ve taken up an odd obsession with flags. I love guessing which flag belongs to what country or state. I love the stories behind the designs. I love how each country incorporates its flag into its culture. So, in honor of under-appreciated flags everywhere, I present to you 11 flag facts that I’ve…
  • The Rise of Content-First Startup

    Blanda
    27 Aug 2014 | 5:59 pm
    Most content websites have the same problem: They’ve assembled an audience. Paying for it? Well, that’s another story. Startups have the reverse problem: they have a product they need to sell immediately, but no audience. As a result we’ve seen startups having robust blogs or newsletter arms that drive that is then given something to buy. I wrote about this collision of journalism and everything else in 2011, and at the time, it was unclear whether this plan would, you know, work. But I think we’re past the stage of “if” a content-first startup isa viable…
  • What I Learned Launching a Print Magazine

    Blanda
    21 Aug 2014 | 6:00 pm
    As news sites continue to grapple for revenue opportunities, a few have returned the familiar ground of print (like Pando, Model View Culture, Grantland, Contently, The Great Discontent, and others). There’s a rising trend of sites that are using online content to build an audience that they turn into a subscriber list which they then charge to send a curated printed product. At 99U we’ve spent the majority of 2014 experimenting with this dynamic. The result is the 99U Quarterly, which is (at least at first) only available to people who have attended the 99U Conference. We…
  • Pretty Much Everything I Know About the News Business

    Blanda
    16 Mar 2014 | 5:00 am
    This was first published on Medium here. Last month, venture capitalist Marc Andreessen posted what, in his view, was the future of the news business. Reactions were varied, but everyone had one. I joked that my entire Twitter stream was people replying to Andreessen as he has very publicly thrown himself into the future of news conversation. We need new voices in this discussion like Andreessen, but his post was too… nice. I’d bet he left his more candid insights out. After the post, I found myself wishing someone would share more actionable observations from the industry. So,…
  • AxisPhilly, The William Penn Foundation, and “Old Philadelphia”

    Blanda
    12 Aug 2013 | 5:01 pm
    On July 11, Philadelphia’s AxisPhilly, a public affairs news site bankrolled by the William Penn Foundation parted ways with its CEO Neil Budde, a move which will likely lead to the site being shuttered or significantly downsized. I no longer live in Philadelphia and am no longer involved in the day-to-day operations of its media community via Technically Philly, but the news of Budde’s departure left me a mix of angry, upset, and frustrated. Why? The Inquirer/Daily News/Philly.com ownership group has changed hands several times while executing a series of perplexing business…
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    Media Disruptus

  • Brainstorm! What are future ways to fund news organizations?

    Steve Outing
    9 Oct 2014 | 10:59 am
    As much as journalists may hate to hear this, news is not something that lots of people are willing to pay for — especially in this go-go digital era when information overload is an epidemic with no end in sight. Advertising, meanwhile, continues to decline as a revenue source for news organizations, which are requiring...
  • HBO has losing game with ‘Thrones’

    Steve Outing
    2 Oct 2014 | 8:59 pm
    The headline above may give the wrong impression. Actually, I love and am seriously addicted to HBO’s Game of Thrones fantasy-drama series. That title refers to the cruel (and unfortunately still usual) way that HBO limits access to the hit TV show. But first, the show. I ignored the hubbub for the first four seasons...
  • A dilemma: Where to host a social-media discussion group

    Steve Outing
    10 Sep 2014 | 5:10 pm
    This week I launched an online community called Writing About the Future, on Facebook Groups. Not everyone who was interested in joining the group was happy that I chose to host it on Facebook. They can be grouped into two simple categories: Yes, Facebook isn’t the ideal home for an online community like Writing About...
  • Writing About the Future: A new community you should join!

    Steve Outing
    7 Sep 2014 | 12:53 pm
    Do you write about the future(s)? Then I hope that you’ll join this new Facebook group/community, “Writing About the Future,” which I just launched. It’s for: Journalists Writers Authors Scriptwriters Filmmakers Educators Students Artists And anyone who wants to learn, share, and/or teach how to write about and anticipate likely futures better
  • Future scenarios at work as a tool for climate advocacy

    Steve Outing
    4 Sep 2014 | 3:39 pm
    “The weather today in 2050 … well, it sucks.” In the world of Foresight (a.k.a., Future Studies or Futurism), “scenarios” are a popular tool for anticipating possible futures. (Note the plural.) Scenarios also can be used in a more restricted way as an effective advocacy tool. A great example of this is happening currently, with...
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    Teaching Online Journalism

  • First-person narratives in journalism

    Mindy McAdams
    19 Oct 2014 | 8:35 am
    After I read this story, I had to give some thought to the idea that “we lose something important in the rush toward first-person takes” (Eve Fairbanks). First, the story linked above is “To Siri, With Love: How One Boy With Autism Became B.F.F.’s With Apple’s Siri,” published in The New York Times on Oct. 17. I saw links to the story everywhere. I didn’t feel like reading it until I saw a discussion about it earlier today:  Everyone cheering on Siri in this touching story should note the boy goes to a $30K a year, no financial aid school.
  • Online News Association conference 2014

    Mindy McAdams
    12 Oct 2014 | 6:37 am
    Links to a small number of really useful resources from #ONA14.
  • Twitter milestone: 9,000 followers

    Mindy McAdams
    21 Sep 2014 | 9:08 am
    Sometime recently, this happened: This is not a lot (especially not when you look at others like Jay Rosen, who has the coveted blue check mark), but it’s nice. The last time the odometer rolled over was in June 2013 (8,000 followers). Recently I switched from HootSuite to TweetDeck. Liking it a lot. 5,000 milestone: 2011 3,000 milestone: 2010 1,000 milestone: 2009 Joined Twitter: March 2007
  • The coming death of print newspapers

    Mindy McAdams
    24 Aug 2014 | 7:47 am
    Say you’re a journalist now working for a newspaper. You know your job is anything but secure. I asked several reporters, editors, and scholars what journalists should do to get ready for the next wave of firings. There were three strong consensus answers: first, get good at understanding and presenting data. Second, understand how social media can work as a newsroom tool. Third, get whatever newsroom experience you can working in teams, and in launching new things. That’s from Clay Shirky, writing in Last Call: The end of the printed newspaper. He goes on to explain those three…
  • Setting up a private WordPress.com blog for group editing

    Mindy McAdams
    15 Jun 2014 | 8:16 am
    When you have a free WordPress.com blog, you can make it private, limiting it to only people you select. You can also allow multiple authors, editors, or a mix of roles on a free WordPress.com blog, whether it is private or public. Here’s what I learned by setting up a private blog that gave editing privileges to several users:  It was easy to make it private: Dashboard > Settings > Reading — find and tick “I would like my site to be private, visible only to users I choose.” It was easy to add new users and assign “roles” to them: Dashboard >…
 
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    Evolving Newsroom

  • Hats off: a whole week with only one tab open at a time

    Julie Starr
    8 Oct 2014 | 5:44 pm
    Love it. Some people at Fast Company had a go at using only one browser tab at a time – for a whole week. The premise behind this challenge is that multitasking rarely works–yes, we can walk and talk at the same time, but when we’re quickly shifting between email, filling out spreadsheets, and checking our Twitter, all we’re actually doing is juggling tasks, and this just kills our focus and makes work take longer. The outcome? Sometimes it makes more sense to focus on one task (and however many tabs you need open to do that one task) rather than rigidly sticking to the one-tab…
  • Bookmarks for October 8, 2014

    Julie Starr
    7 Oct 2014 | 7:26 pm
    Best Cheat Sheets for Designers – Prismatic If any of you have tried to learn a programming language or a coding language, then you understand how tough it is. It’s like learning another speaking language. Certain things mean one thing and other… FarmBot Will 3D Print Your Crops and Email You When It Harvests Them | Motherboard Printing is the new sowing. Volcanic cones regain Maori names | NZ Herald News Many of Auckland’s volcanic cones, including those at the Domain and Mt Smart, have gained official Maori names under a Treaty of Waitangi settlement. Online health…
  • NZ statistics due for release in October 2014

    Julie Starr
    7 Oct 2014 | 3:04 pm
    You can expect to see the following statistics released by StatsNZ in the month of October 2014. You can find this table on the Release Calendar.   1 Oct 14 Recorded Crime Statistics: Fiscal year 2013/14 (year ended June) – tables 2 Oct 14 Ka mārō te aho tapu, ka tau te korowai: Te reo Māori findings from Te Kupenga 2013 – report 2 Oct 14 Ka mārō te aho tapu, ka tau te korowai: Ko ngā kitenga reo Māori mai i Te Kupenga 2013 – report 3 Oct 14 New Zealand Income Survey: June 2014 quarter 3 Oct 14 Integrating New Zealand Census Mortality Study and New Zealand Longitudinal…
  • Kudos to nzherald for embedding source documents in stories

    Julie Starr
    6 Oct 2014 | 6:34 pm
    I’ve been pleasantly surprised to notice nzherald.co.nz increasingly embedding source documents within stories. Perhaps this good practice has just finally made it into everyday workflows or perhaps the impetus is coming from the Herald’s newish data editor Harkanwal Singh, who is a highly motivated champion of data journalism and digital users. Either way, well done and thank you. There was an example this morning in the Bennett rolls out ‘investment approach’ story, which references an issues paper put out by the Productivity Commission asking for public input on how…
  • How to add macrons to Māori words

    Julie Starr
    14 Sep 2014 | 8:24 pm
    UPDATED Macrons are the little lines on top of a vowel that indicate it should be pronounced LONG rather than short.  If you’re not sure where to use macrons when typing Māori, try the Māori Dictionary (there’s also an app). Below are a few ways of adding macrons to Māori words on your keyboard. Newer Macs Windows 7 or later Older PCs Older Macs 1. Newer Macs Hold down the letter on your keyboard and a little menu will appear with all possible accents/macron. It looks like this: Type in the number of (or click on) the accent/macron you want. If you would prefer to use…
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    LOCAL ONLINER

  • First Data Adds Beacon Technology to its Perka Loyalty Solution

    Peter
    23 Oct 2014 | 2:16 pm
    First Data, the payment processing giant, has been building up a suite of services that would take the company far beyond payment processing and inject it squarely in the middle of SMB marketing. The suite as currently configured includes the Clover Point of Sales system; Insightics analytics of transactions; Gyft virtual gift card services; and Perka, a sophisticated loyalty program for SMBs. Each of the services works independently, but are also increasingly integrated as well. Perka was purchased by First Data roughly one year ago; in tandem with First Data’ purchase of Clover. Competing…
  • Gannett’s Key Ring: Integrating Circulars With Loyalty Programs

    Peter
    17 Oct 2014 | 5:14 pm
    Gannett’s acquisition of Key Ring two years ago was something of a head shaker. Was the media giant diving into online loyalty marketing, an area mostly dominated by financial institution-related companies? Two years later, more light has been shed on the Key Ring acquisition. Key Ring is a mobile app that lets consumers electronically enter their loyalty card in in one digital location. In this regard, it is like Constant Contact’s CardStar. What we’ve learned is that Gannett is using the App to drive targeted traffic to its big box and retail circular advertisers from ShopLocal, the…
  • It’s Out: The Lineup for Leading in Local: ILM 2014 (Dec. 3-5, SFO)

    Peter
    15 Oct 2014 | 4:49 pm
    The initial lineup for Leading in Local: Interactive Local Media 2014 is now officially released. This year’s ILM – our flagship event — takes place Dec. 3-5 at the SFO Hyatt, close to San Francisco and just up the road from most of the Silicon Valley leaders and startups. We expect 45+ hand-picked speakers, and more than 500 senior level attendees for the show, which remains local’s premier networking (and dealmaking) event. Of special interest: The Local Tech Expo on Day 1, where we’ll feature some of the great technology innovations rocking our local world: everything,…
  • All Roads Lead to Groceries: Groupon Adds ‘Snap’ Loyalty Program

    Peter
    2 Oct 2014 | 11:59 am
    When it comes to local commerce and loyalty programs, all roads lead to groceries. That’s the feeling of key companies in the space, including WalMart, Amazon, Google and eBay. Groupon this week announced Snap, a grocery coupon and loyalty program that gets it into groceries in a more meaningful way than prior efforts to go in via daily deals – where the discounts were not sustainable in an industry that is more dependent on “cents off” than “55 percent” off. As reported in Chicago Business, Snap replaces Freebies, a coupon program launched in 2013 that has…
  • Ex Reach Local CEO Revisits Home Improvement; Groupon is Lead Investor

    Peter
    1 Oct 2014 | 9:52 am
    ReachLocal cofounder Zorik Gordon left the company last year after veering sharply to the left with ClubLocal, a consumer-facing brand that would collect home improvement pricing and reviews, and assign jobs to home improvement pros. Now, Gordon and several ClubLocal alumnis are back with Serviz, a similar service that has launched in southern California after running a beta since February. Groupon is Serviz’s largest investor, with an undisclosed ownership share. ReachLocal, where much of the intellectual work was developed, still controls 19.8 percent of the company. Groupon could…
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    Pew Research Center's Journalism Project

  • Appendix C: Trust and Distrust of News Sources by Ideological Group

    Pew Research Center's Journalism Project
    20 Oct 2014 | 8:01 pm
  • Appendix B: The News Sources

    Pew Research Center's Journalism Project
    20 Oct 2014 | 8:01 pm
    In Wave 1 of the American Trends Panel questionnaire, web respondents were asked a series of questions about news sources for information about government and politics. Respondents were first asked whether they have heard of 36 sources. Icons for the sources were arrayed on two screens of 18 sources each, randomized within each screen, as […]
  • About the Study

    Pew Research Center's Journalism Project
    20 Oct 2014 | 8:01 pm
    This report is part of a series by the Pew Research Center aimed at understanding the nature and scope of political polarization in the American public, and how it interrelates with government, society and people’s personal lives. Data in this report are drawn from the first wave of the Pew Research Center’s American Trends Panel, […]
  • Section 3: Talking Politics: Leaders vs. Listeners and the Views People Hear

    Pew Research Center's Journalism Project
    20 Oct 2014 | 8:01 pm
    Conversations with others remain an integral part of how we learn about government and politics. As one respondent stated, “Word of mouth is a large part of how political views are formed.” Said another, “Talking with other residents in our area is a useful way to keep up with local politics.” In general, most adults […]
  • Appendix A: Web vs. Total Sample

    Pew Research Center's Journalism Project
    20 Oct 2014 | 8:01 pm
    This survey was conducted using the American Trends Panel, a nationally representative panel of randomly selected U.S. adults. As with the American public overall, the vast majority of panel members has web access and has opted to take the surveys online. Indeed, data from the survey for the first report in this polarization series, and from […]
 
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    News

  • Tom Kennedy Named ASMP Executive Director

    2094
    21 Oct 2014 | 10:25 am
    Thomas Russell Kennedy has been named as the new executive director of the American Society of Media Photographers (ASMP).
  • INSIDE TRACKS: The National Geographic Assignment Of A Lifetime

    2094
    16 Oct 2014 | 8:55 pm
    It is a truism of war that it is always better to be a lucky general than a smart one. The same holds true for photojournalists. Being at the right place at the right time, with the right equipment, is what often leads to memorable storytelling.
  • Syracuse Disinvites WashPost Pulitzer Photographer Due To Ebola Fears

    2094
    16 Oct 2014 | 4:04 pm
    Three-time Pulitzer Prize-winning photojournalist Michel du Cille of The Washington Post, who returned from covering the Ebola crisis in Liberia 21 days ago and who is symptom free, was asked by Syracuse University officials today not to come to campus where he was scheduled to participate in a journalism program.
  • Services Thursday For Michael Robert Gehrz, 33

    2094
    13 Oct 2014 | 11:23 am
    Michael Robert Gehrz, 33, the son of Minneapolis Star Tribune photojournalist Jim Gehrz, died suddenly Friday, October 10, 2014.
  • The Right To Photograph And Record In Public

    2094
    9 Oct 2014 | 12:39 pm
    You are cordially invited to attend this free panel discussion, sponsored by the National Press Photographers Association and the SDX Foundation of the Society of Professional Journalists.
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    Online Journalism Blog

  • Why do you optimise content for search and social? 4 reasons and a mnemomic to boot

    Paul Bradshaw
    12 Oct 2014 | 11:59 pm
    Background image by mrgarethm Content strategies are one of the many things that used to be the preserve of publishers and editors. We didn’t call it ‘content strategy’ then: we ‘chose angles’ or adopted an ‘editorial approach’. Now of course every journalist is a publisher, an editor, and a distributor. We control our Twitter platform, Facebook page, perhaps a professional blog and other platforms to boot. We are expected to be web first in all sorts of ways. That means new responsibilities. We have to make choices about style, medium, timing and…
  • Hyperlocal Voices: Mark Baynes, Love Wapping

    Damian Radcliffe
    1 Oct 2014 | 12:08 am
    In our latest interview with hyperlocal practitioners, Damian Radcliffe speaks to Mark Baynes from Love Wapping.  A journalist, professional photographer and user experience designer; Mark explains how his mutual love of data and wildlife has manifested itself in this East London  hyperlocal site. Who are the people behind the blog? Just me! Fortunately I have an odd mix of professional skills that are invaluable for hyperlocal work: photography, journalism, print production and web design and development. Developing the tech structure (WordPress) of the site is not an issue for me so I…
  • Thinking of doing your student project online? Here are 5 mistakes to avoid

    Paul Bradshaw
    30 Sep 2014 | 12:47 am
    Journalism courses often expect students to spend a large part of their final year or semester producing an independent project. Here, for those about to embark on such a project online, or putting together a proposal for one, I list some common pitfalls to watch out for… 1. The volunteer pitfall: contributor-driven websites An increasing number of students are basing their projects on work for websites which rely on unpaid content. These websites can be useful for building experience, contacts and exposure in the first year of an undergraduate journalism course – but as the…
  • Hyperlocal Voices: Jack Davies, Tongwynlais

    Damian Radcliffe
    22 Sep 2014 | 2:02 am
    We’re back to Wales for the latest interview in our Hyperlocal Voices series; as Jack Davies tells Damian Radcliffe about the community website for Tongwynlais in Cardiff. Launched in Summer 2012, the site covers a village in the north of the Welsh capital. 1. Who were the people behind the blog? I created and continue to run the site entirely on my own. I’ve considered recruiting new contributors but at the moment I have the time and energy to do it myself. 2. What made you decide to set up the blog? I moved to the village three years ago and felt it wasn’t being adequately…
  • 16 reasons why this research will change how you look at news consumption

    Paul Bradshaw
    10 Sep 2014 | 6:09 am
    Image by Zilverbat Most research on news consumption annoys me. Most research on news consumption – like Pew’s State of the News Media – relies on surveys of people self-reporting how they consume news. But surveys can only answer the questions that they ask. And as any journalist with a decent bullshit detector should know: the problem is people misremember, people forget, and people lie. The most interesting news consumption research uses ethnography: this involves watching people and measuring what they actually do – not what they say they do. To this end…
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    Common Sense Journalism

  • When prescriptivism scrapes the railing: plethora

    Doug Fisher
    7 Oct 2014 | 7:36 am
    I love the Testy Copy Editors blog overseen by Phil Blanchard. It's one of my daily go-tos.But occasionally, as is always going to happen at places that ruminate over usage and other editorial matters, the danger is that things take on a "get off my lawn" tone. It happens in this space too, regrettably, though I try to avoid it.So from TCE today comes this:Shannon Serpette of Henry is our new copy editor. She comes to the BCR with a plethora of writing experience. Her smiling face is a great addition to our department, and she’s also going to continue doing some writing. If you get a phone…
  • From the brevity files -- how to sound like a tool (again)

    Doug Fisher
    3 Oct 2014 | 8:48 am
    Today's superfluous wording from The State (though the TVs thoughtlessly do this all the time):Lexington County Coroner Earl Wells said Ethan Payne, 13, of Lexington, died after sustaining a single gunshot wound.Or, in plain English: died after being shot once.Do we really want to sound like a tool of the authorities that much? Are we that insecure?
  • Headlines: Where you put the atttibution can be important

    Doug Fisher
    25 Sep 2014 | 3:31 pm
    It's worth some attention to where you put the attribution in a headline.There's this gem from Reuters, courtesy of James Montalbano over at Testy Copy Editors.
  • SC FOIA: The legislative exemption

    Doug Fisher
    17 Sep 2014 | 7:38 am
    The Nerve has an interesting piece this morning on a big exemption to the state's open-records law as the legislature moves forward to close some holes punched in the FOIA this year by court rulings.This one puts much of the Legislature's correspondence off-limits.It's a tough nut: While I tend to not want to delve into the average Joe's or Jane's plea for help with , say, a workers' comp claim, I sure would like to know if the Koch brothers are trying to influence folks.And this from state Sen. Brad Hutto is a bit disingenous: “Ultimately, all we do is public. ... How we come to a decision…
  • FOIA: Another little chip away in South Carolina - criminal suspects' birthdates

    Doug Fisher
    11 Sep 2014 | 1:23 pm
    S.C. officials will find any way they can to withhold more information, it seems. This from The State newspaper this week:The S.C. Department of Public Safety said it no longer will release the date of birth in incidents the agency handles.Failure to provide that information makes it nearly impossible for the public or the media to determine whether a suspect or victim has a criminal history. SLED requires the public to provide a date of birth to do such a search.The agency’s legal staff cites two state laws to bolster its decision: The Family and Personal Identifying Information Privacy…
 
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    CyberJournalist.net

  • explore-blog: Science storyteller Diane Ackerman (who was also...

    6 Oct 2014 | 5:47 am
    explore-blog: Science storyteller Diane Ackerman (who was also Carl Sagan’s favorite poet) on what the future of robots reveals about the human condition – such a gorgeous read. 
  • Do you why there was a starbucks cup in tumblr’s logo?...

    30 Sep 2014 | 9:06 am
    Do you why there was a starbucks cup in tumblr’s logo? Here’s why.
  • This Vertical Life: The Media Models I Admire

    28 Sep 2014 | 4:25 pm
    This Vertical Life: The Media Models I Admire: rafat: Verticals have a particular attraction for me, which may have something to do with my general obsessiveness. Picking a topic you’re willing to spend a good number of years in, going deep into it with everything you have, and build the largest and most influential voice in it, that is what I… Great sites to monitor
  • Highlights of Online News Association Conference #ONA14

    27 Sep 2014 | 8:41 am
    Here’s a collections of the best summaries, slides and notes from the 2014 ONA conference. Keynote: Deep Dive into The New York Times Innovation Report Video technology wows online news conference Going Mobile presentation summary Metrics that matter: A Presentation by Chartbeat’s Tony Haile All Eyes on Ferguson discussion Big Impact with Small Teams: Designing a Kick-Ass Process for the Small and Scrappy News App Team Words of advice for news startups Visual journalism for tiny news desks Check back as more links will be added. Please end link submissions to @cyberjournalist on Twitter…
  • Navigating the Twitter tempest #ONA14

    25 Sep 2014 | 10:46 am
    ianhillmedia: A recap of an ONA14 panel on Twitter.
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    OUPblog » Media

  • Has open access failed?

    Alice
    22 Oct 2014 | 11:30 pm
    At the Conference on Open Access Scholarly Publishing in Paris last month, Claudio Aspesi, Senior Analyst at Sanford C. Bernstein, raised an uncomfortable question. Did the continuing financial health of traditional publishers like Elsevier indicate that open access had “failed”? According to Aspesi, “Expectations that OA will address the serial costs crisis are fading away.” Is Aspesi right? Has open access failed? I certainly don’t think so – but that doesn’t mean the job is done… Defining success When we launched BioMed Central in 2000, the goal was a simple and…
  • How much are nurses worth?

    Julie Fergus
    22 Oct 2014 | 7:30 am
    If you ask many people about nurses, they will tell you how caring and kind nurses are. The word “angel” might even appear. Nursing consistently tops the annual Gallup poll comparing the ethics and honesty of different professions. But it’s worth exploring the extent to which society really values nursing. In recent decades, a global nursing shortage has often meant too few nurses to fill open positions, woefully inadequate nurse staffing levels, and not enough funds for nursing education. Many nurses have migrated across the globe, easing shortages in developed nations but exacerbating…
  • What we’ve learned and what we missed

    Barney Cox
    22 Oct 2014 | 3:30 am
    A ten-year anniversary seems an opportune time to take stock. Much has been said already about Oxford Scholarship Online (OSO) as it moves into its second decade, and let’s cast the net a bit wider and focus not on OSO, per se, but on what the academic publishing industry has gotten right and what we’ve missed since OSO was in its infancy. The biggest change, of which OSO has been a central component at Oxford University Press, has of course been the transition from a print-centric, manufacturing-based industry to a print-and-online, service-oriented industry. Drawing on that general…
  • Questions surrounding open access licensing

    Alice
    20 Oct 2014 | 11:30 pm
    Open access (OA) publishing stands at something of a crossroads. OA is now part of the mainstream. But with increasing success and increasing volume come increasing complexity, scrutiny, and demand. There are many facets of OA which will prove to be significant challenges for publishers over the next few years. Here I’m going to focus on one — licensing — and discuss how the arguments seen over licensing in recent months shine a light on the difference between OA as a movement, and OA as a reality. Today’s authors face a number of conflicting pressures. Publish in a high…
  • Five key moments in the Open Access movement in the last ten years

    Alice
    19 Oct 2014 | 11:30 pm
    In 2014 Oxford University Press celebrates ten years of open access (OA) publishing. In that time open access has grown massively as a movement and an industry. Here we look back at five key moments which have marked that growth. 2004/05 – Nucleic Acids Research (NAR) converts to OA At first glance it might seem parochial to include this here, but as Rich Roberts noted on this blog in 2012, Nucleic Acids Research’s move to open access was truly ‘momentous’. To put it in context, in 2004 NAR was OUP’s biggest owned journal and it was not at all clear that many of the elements…
 
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    Blogposts | The Guardian

  • Seattle Sounders vs LA Galaxy live!

    Graham Parker
    25 Oct 2014 | 1:55 pm
    LA Galaxy must win to take Supporters ShieldSeattle Sounders only need a draw for top spotOmar Gonzalez suspended for visitorsTweet your thoughts to @KidWeilOr email graham.parker@theguardian.com 4.55pm ET SEATTLE SOUNDERS WIN THE 2014 SUPPORTERS SHIELD!Final thoughts in a minute... 4.54pm ET So cheeky!. Penedo tries to bring the ball out and is robbed by Pappa, who has Martins free on his right. He doesnt need him though, as he scoops the deftest of little chips over the scrambling keeper to seal the game and the Shield! 4.52pm ET 90 mins +4So well have more than the specified three minutes…
  • The X Factor 2014: week three as it happens

    Stuart Heritage
    25 Oct 2014 | 1:55 pm
    Its movie madness week. Join Stuart Heritage as Rocky, James Bond and the Beatles go to war 9.55pm BST Hank Hey Now Big Package Kingsley is singing I Dont Wanna Miss a Thing. By which I mean hes yelling ARDANWONNAMISAFING. 9.54pm BST Thats right, its time for Hank Hey Now Big Package Kingsley. You know, after last week, Im sort of rooting for Hank, purely because of Louiss gigantic big package freudian slip last week. Fingers crossed this time Louis will just critique Hank by closing his eyes and sticking his tongue out like hes French-kissing an invisible ghost. 9.52pm BST Time for the final…
  • Doctor Who recap: series 34, episode 10 In the Forest of the Night

    Dan Martin
    25 Oct 2014 | 1:05 pm
    Frank Cottrell Boyces episode had one of the greatest setups Doctor Who has ever known, riffing on the classic childrens story phrase, And they ventured into the forest SPOILER ALERT: This weekly blog is for those who have been watching the new series of Doctor Who. Dont read ahead if you havent seen episode 10 In the Forest of the Night Read Dan Martins episode nine episode blog hereIf you read almost any story a kid writes in primary school, it will say, And they ventured into the forest The forest is danger, isnt it? But Id never seen it in a dystopia, really. When youve had…
  • Sunday Express agrees to pay damages to Mike Tindall

    Roy Greenslade
    25 Oct 2014 | 12:43 pm
    Express Newspapers has "apologised unreservedly" and paid damages to Mike Tindall, husband of the Queen's granddaughter Zara Phillips.Tindall sued because the Sunday Express falsely reported rumours in February 2013 about his marriage to Phillips, the daughter of Princess Anne. Continue reading...
  • Strictly Come Dancing 2014: week five as it happened

    Heidi Stephens
    25 Oct 2014 | 12:17 pm
    After Bargain Hunts Tim Wonnacott danced his last, the 12 remaining couples compete. Heidi Stephens watched all the action 8.17pm BST So thats it for tonights show! Ill be back here tomorrow at 7.20pm for the results thank you to everyone who joined in, feel free to pop by on Twitter @heidistephens and tell me who you think is dancing off into the Strictly sunset tomorrow night. ALSO, dont forget to make the most of the extra hour tomorrow. Hey, why not do a bit of Salsa whilst pressure washing your wheelie bins? Oh hang on, thats my plan. Keeeep dancing etc, and Ill see you tomorrow! 8.16pm…
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    One Man and His Blog

  • Flickr arrives on the iPad - finally

    Adam Tinworth
    18 Oct 2014 | 3:13 pm
    Few apps have deserved the response "at last" more than the Flickr iPad app. The fact that it has taken over four years for this to surface is a sign of just how much Yahoo has dropped the ball with the service over the years. But, hey, they're playing catchup, and they've done a really nice job of it with this app. Browsing and searching through photo streams is easy, photos open smoothly into full view even on my aging iPad 3 (which will be replaced by a sparkly new iPad Air 2 next week...), and the information overlays use iOS's translucency beautifully. It also integrates nicely with…
  • Into Yosemite

    Adam Tinworth
    14 Oct 2014 | 9:02 am
    Oh, and I'm now working full-time in the new Mac OS version: Yosemite. It probably won't be released to the public until after Thursday's Apple event, but the public beta is now essential at Gold Master, and the version I've been running off an external hard drive seems stable. It's now on my "production" machine - and eight hours in, all seems fine.
  • The price of the four-day weekend

    Adam Tinworth
    14 Oct 2014 | 8:46 am
    I sometimes underestimate just how different the life I choose to live is. I can often work where I want - like the coffee shop I'm sat in right now. I have a lot of freedom to pick and choose the people I work with - and have taken satisfaction is severing ties with people who proved unpleasant as clients. I don't have a boss, or a full-time job. My time is pretty much mine to manage, but that comes with choices. For example, I've just spent four solid days looking after my toddler daughter, picking up some of my wife's days, so she can get a handle on her work as term really kicks in. And I…
  • #selfie culture

    Adam Tinworth
    9 Oct 2014 | 5:59 am
    Is selfie culture rendering moments lesser than your role in them, and the record of them? Even if it is - is it a problem? And is it even new? I have a relative that doesn't see the point of most photos that don't have a family member in them...
  • The end of The Magazine

    Adam Tinworth
    9 Oct 2014 | 3:46 am
    Pioneering sub-compact magazine The Magazine is going away: The Magazine will cease publishing its regular every-other-week issues with the December 17, 2014, edition. We don't see this as a failure, but as the right time. The Magazine was frankly gloriously profitable in its first year as readers came onboard to try out the app and the format, but they then very slowly trickled away. This was abetted in part by Apple's decision to hide Newsstand apps, a constant complaint by readers who simply forgot when we had new issues appear. We also have problems getting notifications to work reliably,…
 
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    The American Prospect

  • Will Elizabeth Warren Run? Her New Challenge to Hillary Clinton

    Robert Kuttner
    24 Oct 2014 | 12:43 pm
    This article is an updated version of "What Clinton Could Learn From Warren," in the Fall 2014 issue of The American Prospect magazine. Senator Elizabeth Warren stunned the political world this week with her comment in an interview with People magazine, which seemed to leave the door open for a presidential run in 2016. Asked whether she would run, Warren said, ambiguously, “I don’t think so,” but added, “If there’s any lesson I’ve learned in the last five years, it’s don’t be so sure about what lies ahead. There are amazing doors that could open.” Well! That certainly set…
  • We know College Feminists Care About Sexual Assault. But What About Abortion?

    Rachel M. Cohen
    24 Oct 2014 | 8:03 am
    In the past three years, more abortion restrictions have been enacted in the United States than in the entire previous decade. At the same time, 85 colleges and universities are now under federal investigation for their handling of sexual violence. While these two issues are not divergent, campus feminists have devoted much of their energy to challenging their universities’ failure to adequately handle sexual assault cases—often at the expense of abortion rights advocacy. But the growing threats to reproductive justice—like the Texas law that could shut down most of the state’s…
  • Gaga and Bennett: Making a Great American Art Form Hip Again

    Harold Meyerson
    24 Oct 2014 | 7:28 am
    Tony Bennett has long been as much a jazz singer as a pop singer, though I readily acknowledge that the distinction between the two has always been fuzzy. This has been particularly true throughout the second coming of his career—his rise again to popular and critical acclaim over the past two decades. The onetime crooner and belter of “I Left My Heart in San Francisco” can’t quite hold those long notes like he used to or glissando up and down the scale without an occasional unintended bump. The marvel is, he’s still a great singer at age 88, in no small part by jazzing his singing…
  • Rand Paul Continues Record of Brilliant Media Manipulation

    Paul Waldman
    23 Oct 2014 | 10:44 am
    As I've probably made clear by now, I am 1) abundantly skeptical of Rand Paul's ability to be president of the United States, and only somewhat less skeptical of his ability to win the presidency; and 2) in tremendous admiration of Paul's skill at working the media. There will be abundant time to explore #1 in the months ahead, but today offers us yet another example of #2. Paul, you see, is convening a super-secret meeting of his brain trust to discuss his upcoming presidential campaign, and somehow, news of the meeting found its way to the National Journal and reporter Shane Goldmacher:…
  • France and Italy Tell Germany: Take Your Austerity and Stuff It

    Robert Kuttner
    23 Oct 2014 | 6:42 am
    (Stefan Rousseau/PA Wire - Press Association via AP Images) At the Nato Summit in Newport, South Wales, Italian Prime Minister Matteo Renzi, German Chancellor Angela Merkel and French President Francoise Hollande gather to watch a flypast of military aircraft from Nato member countries on the final day of the summit at the Celtic Manor on Friday, September 5, 2014. There was a bit of good news from Europe last week. Two of the nations that desperately need some respite from austerity essentially told German Chancellor Merkel to stuff it. France, under pressure from Germany and the European…
 
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    Nieman Lab

  • The newsonomics of MLB’s pioneering mobile experience

    Ken Doctor
    23 Oct 2014 | 9:33 am
    There was the voice of Jon Miller, baseball’s best and wittiest game caller, setting the scene for me, some 5,000 miles away from San Francisco’s AT&T Park. As Travis Ishikawa strode to the plate, my Shinkansen bullet train was headed north out of Kanazawa, Japan — quite ironically, the seat of Ishikawa Prefecture. As Ishikawa powered a home run to the deepest part of the ballpark, winning the game with a walk-off and sending the San Francisco Giants to the World Series, I heard live the fan euphoria, and the familiar voices of the Giants’ radio crew picking apart the…
  • Why The New York Times built a tool for crowdsourced time travel

    Justin Ellis
    23 Oct 2014 | 7:00 am
    Flipping through old magazine and newspaper ads is like throwing the switch on the world’s simplest time machine. Suddenly it’s 1969, the Apollo 11 astronauts have just made the round trip from the moon, Abbey Road just dropped, and for the low price of $29.95 you can enjoy an “electric computerized football game [that] lets you and your opponent call offensive and defensive plays.” This is the benefit a paper like The New York Times finds in its archive: the ability to pluck moments from the historical record out of the past — the small steps and giant leaps, but…
  • Opening up the archives: JSTOR wants to tie a library to the news

    Joseph Lichterman
    22 Oct 2014 | 8:00 am
    The Journal of Parasitology published its first issue in September 1914. The academic journal — which, you’ll be surprised to learn, publishes scholarly writing about the study of parasites — is celebrating its 100th anniversary this fall. You can even buy a t-shirt to mark the occasion! But unless you’re a parasitologist, it’s unlikely you’ve even heard of the journal, let alone were aware of its major birthday. But JSTOR Daily, a new online magazine from the digital academic library JSTOR, is looking to introduce academic research and scholarly writers to a…
  • Six fresh ideas for news design from a #SNDMakes designathon

    Caroline O'Donovan
    22 Oct 2014 | 7:00 am
    The Society for News Design hosted its second #SNDMakes hackathon in Boston this past weekend. The last iteration of the event was held in Indianapolis, hosted about two dozen designers, developers, and journalists, and produced a handful of ongoing projects. This fall’s event was hosted by Upstatement, the Boston-based design firm that’s worked with a number of media clients, including The Boston Globe, NPR, and Global News. geeks gonna geek #SNDMakes pic.twitter.com/9mHsAmQJlq — Ryan D Ghost, BOO (@sixfoot6) October 17, 2014 #SNDMakes Boston participants came from both…
  • Where you get your news depends on where you stand on the issues

    Justin Ellis
    20 Oct 2014 | 9:01 pm
    Strong liberals and strong conservatives disagree on an awful lot — but there are a lot of ways they’re more like each other than they are like those closer to the middle. And some of those involve the ways they interact with news media. That’s one of the takeaways from a new report from the Pew Research Center on how ideology and political polarization intersect with media consumption habits. The study, “Political Polarization & Media Habits,” looks at how the news Americans consume and the outlets they follow help to shape or reinforce their political outlook.
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    Failure Magazine's Feature Articles

  • Robert Morris’s Folly

    jzasky@aol.com
    19 Oct 2014 | 6:33 pm
    How Robert Morris went from being an essential to nearly-forgotten Founding Father.
  • The Twenty-Seventh of May 1977

    jzasky@aol.com
    14 Oct 2014 | 2:04 pm
    Journalist Lara Pawson attempts to explain what happened in Angola on 27 May 1977—and its profound effect on the Angolan people in the decades since.
  • Statue of Liberty: The Untold Story

    jzasky@aol.com
    5 Oct 2014 | 6:58 pm
    The Statue of Liberty was not a gift from the French government, for one.
  • United Flight 232

    jzasky@aol.com
    13 Jul 2014 | 4:57 pm
    Twenty-five years ago this month, United Airlines Flight 232—scheduled from Denver to Philadelphia via Chicago—crash-landed at Sioux Gateway Airport in Sioux City, Iowa, killing 112 people. The outcome could have been worse.
  • Gruesome Spectacles

    jzasky@aol.com
    16 Jun 2014 | 5:31 am
    Botched executions are up since 1980, suggesting that technology has failed to make the process more reliable and humane.
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    Common Sense Journalism

  • When prescriptivism scrapes the railing: plethora

    7 Oct 2014 | 7:36 am
    I love the Testy Copy Editors blog overseen by Phil Blanchard. It's one of my daily go-tos.But occasionally, as is always going to happen at places that ruminate over usage and other editorial matters, the danger is that things take on a "get off my lawn" tone. It happens in this space too, regrettably, though I try to avoid it.So from TCE today comes this:Shannon Serpette of Henry is our new copy editor. She comes to the BCR with a plethora of writing experience. Her smiling face is a great addition to our department, and she’s also going to continue doing some writing. If you get a phone…
  • From the brevity files -- how to sound like a tool (again)

    3 Oct 2014 | 8:48 am
    Today's superfluous wording from The State (though the TVs thoughtlessly do this all the time):Lexington County Coroner Earl Wells said Ethan Payne, 13, of Lexington, died after sustaining a single gunshot wound.Or, in plain English: died after being shot once.Do we really want to sound like a tool of the authorities that much? Are we that insecure?
  • Headlines: Where you put the atttibution can be important

    25 Sep 2014 | 3:31 pm
    It's worth some attention to where you put the attribution in a headline.There's this gem from Reuters, courtesy of James Montalbano over at Testy Copy Editors.
  • SC FOIA: The legislative exemption

    17 Sep 2014 | 7:38 am
    The Nerve has an interesting piece this morning on a big exemption to the state's open-records law as the legislature moves forward to close some holes punched in the FOIA this year by court rulings.This one puts much of the Legislature's correspondence off-limits.It's a tough nut: While I tend to not want to delve into the average Joe's or Jane's plea for help with , say, a workers' comp claim, I sure would like to know if the Koch brothers are trying to influence folks.And this from state Sen. Brad Hutto is a bit disingenous: “Ultimately, all we do is public. ... How we come to a decision…
  • FOIA: Another little chip away in South Carolina - criminal suspects' birthdates

    11 Sep 2014 | 1:23 pm
    S.C. officials will find any way they can to withhold more information, it seems. This from The State newspaper this week:The S.C. Department of Public Safety said it no longer will release the date of birth in incidents the agency handles.Failure to provide that information makes it nearly impossible for the public or the media to determine whether a suspect or victim has a criminal history. SLED requires the public to provide a date of birth to do such a search.The agency’s legal staff cites two state laws to bolster its decision: The Family and Personal Identifying Information Privacy…
 
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    Pacific Standard

  • We Need to Normalize Drug Use in Our Society

    Stanton Peele
    24 Oct 2014 | 4:00 pm
    Drug use was never considered to be in a special category of human experience until we medicalized addiction—and that idea has been disastrous. Drugs are now returning to their life-sized status as part of the range of normal human behaviors. And they are ubiquitous. Realism about drugs and addiction must dictate drug policy. HOW WE DISCOVERED, THEN REJECTED, ADDICTION There is a myth that narcotics cause addiction, a myth created early in the 20th century. Yet both Americans and Brits used copious amounts of opiates in the 19th century—think laudanum, a tinctured opiate, given lavishly…
  • A Letter to the Next Attorney General: Fix Presidential Pardons

    Stephen Engelberg
    24 Oct 2014 | 2:00 pm
    Dear Possible Attorney General Nominees (You Know Who You Are), Now that President Obama has put off nominating his new Attorney General until after the November 4 elections, there’s some extra time to immerse yourself in the issues you will confront during your confirmation hearing while, of course, waiting to see if you make the final cut. Right now, you’re probably scrambling through your personal records for the name, Social Security number, and address of every nanny or lawn guy your family ever employed. But as you study up on the National Security Agency’s…
  • What Makes You So Smart, Middle School Math Teacher?

    Noah Davis
    24 Oct 2014 | 12:00 pm
    More than half a century ago, Vern Williams walked into a middle school math classroom—and he’s never really left. After graduating from the University of Maryland in 1972, he began teaching in Virginia’s Fairfax County Public School System, working at Longfellow Middle School’s gifted and talented program as well as the Johns Hopkins Center for Talented Youth Summer Program. President George W. Bush appointed him to the National Mathematics Advisory Panel, and he won two national awards from the Mathematics Association of America. Williams talked to Pacific Standard about…
  • Why DNA Is One of Humanity’s Greatest Inventions

    Michael White
    24 Oct 2014 | 10:00 am
    Humans and their ancestors have been using tools for millions of years. We owe our prolific capacity for making tools to our DNA, and now we’ve reached the point were we’ve made DNA itself into a tool. We use DNA as a crucial research tool in the lab, we use it to engineer food crops and biofuel-producing microbes, we use it as a forensic tool and a medical diagnostic, and we use it to access our ancient history. We’ve even put DNA to uses that have nothing to do with biology whatsoever, as a nanomaterial with amazing chemical properties. Our genetic material is turning out…
  • What Do Clowns Think of Clowns?

    Paul Hiebert
    24 Oct 2014 | 8:00 am
    Another year, another evil clown. It’s almost expected at this point. The latest iteration is Twisty, a quiet yet hulking barrel of horrors who lumbers around 1950s Jupiter, Florida, killing and kidnapping innocent town folk on FX’s American Horror Story: Freak Show. Series co-creator Ryan Murphy said the goal was to “create the most terrifying clown of all time,” to which some might reply, mission accomplished. Then again, Twisty is just one of many sinister clown characters. Others include the Joker, Pennywise, John Wayne Gacy, and the Insane Clown Posse. Last year,…
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    ProPublica: Articles and Investigations

  • Judge Doesn’t ‘Think’ Police are Abusing Spy Technology, and More in MuckReads

    ProPublica
    24 Oct 2014 | 1:00 pm
    by Terry Parris Jr "It's not just bullets you need to watch out for."  For the public, gun ranges are the most common way of getting lead poisoning outside of the workplace. And with an estimated 40 million annual recreational shooters and 10,000 gun ranges in America, the risk of contamination, if left unchecked, is highThe Seattle Times, through a "first-of-its-kind" analysis of occupational lead-monitoring data, found that shooting-range owners repeatedly violated workplace safety laws and the agencies that are supposed to monitor lead poisoning have been slow…
  • Tobacco Settlement Funds Sprinklers, Golf Carts and a Grease Trap

    ProPublica
    24 Oct 2014 | 8:48 am
    by Cezary Podkul A central tenet of government finance is that money borrowed over the long term should be spent on projects that will outlast the debt – things like buildings, bridges or other essential infrastructure. That's not what upstate New York's Niagara County did with much of its money from tobacco bonds. Golf carts. Computers. Defibrillators. Portable radios. Even a grease trap for the jail's kitchen. The list of goods or projects with just a few years' useful life goes on – all paid for with debt that will last decades. Nor did the money go toward the health care costs…
  • The Millions New York Counties Coulda Got

    ProPublica
    23 Oct 2014 | 11:58 am
    by Lena Groeger and Cezary Podkul In 1999, New York counties had a choice to make. They had just been promised annual payments from tobacco companies as part of a national settlement to reimburse them for smoking-related health care costs. Like winning the lottery, they could either get small payments indefinitely—or take a lump sum immediately by entering into “securitization” deals. Counties knew that these deals would mean less money in the long run, but bankers said they offered protection in case the payments shrank or went away. Now the cost is clear: millions pledged…
  • How One New York County Fell Into the Tobacco Debt Trap

    ProPublica
    23 Oct 2014 | 11:18 am
    by Cezary Podkul LOCKPORT, N.Y. – As they met at The Shamus, a favorite local lunch spot, on a September day a year ago, Niagara County officials considered some good news. Thanks to low interest rates, they might be able to refinance a big chunk of Niagara's tobacco bonds – debts payable from the county's share of a massive 1998 legal settlement with Big Tobacco. Eager to lower costs by replacing the bonds with less-expensive debt, they decided to move ahead. As a bonus, they figured the county could raise some new money for projects like fixing up Niagara's jail. But when…
  • How We Analyzed New York County Tobacco Bonds

    ProPublica
    23 Oct 2014 | 11:11 am
    by Lena Groeger and Cezary Podkul For this news app, ProPublica compared New York counties' cumulative tobacco securitization proceeds to actual and projected payments under the national tobacco settlement of 1998. The app allows users to explore different scenarios for the payments over time and see how long it takes for the payments to match or exceed the proceeds counties received from "securitizing" -- that is, selling their stream of tobacco settlement money to debt investors in return for upfront cash. Because securitization involves taking a discounted lump-sum payment upfront in…
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    ProPublica: Podcast

  • Podcast: When U.S. Companies Help the NSA

    20 Oct 2014 | 7:48 am
    Julia Angwin and Jeff Larson on blurring borders in an Internet age and the tension between national security and personal privacy.
  • Podcast: The Racial Disparity in Fatal Police Shootings

    13 Oct 2014 | 8:54 am
    The FBI's data on fatal police shootings has its flaws but it illustrates an undeniable truth: black teens have an outsize risk of being shot and killed by law enforcement.
  • Podcast: Your Privacy for a Sweet Treat

    6 Oct 2014 | 9:20 am
    Lois Beckett talks with Stephen Engelberg, Julia Angwin and Justin Elliott about why hundreds of people at a street fair gave up sensitive information in exchange for a cookie.
  • Podcast: How ‘Wee Things’ Make a Big Difference in Design

    29 Sep 2014 | 10:34 am
    ProPublica's Lena Groeger and Nicole Collins Bronzan discuss how people read and interpret small visual forms, how tiny details help us make sense of information and how we can use wee things to design better graphics, interactives and experiences on the web.
  • Podcast: How Insurers Are Charging You More for Your Generic Drugs

    22 Sep 2014 | 9:02 am
    Some insurers are starting to charge patients more out of pocket for generic drugs, including those that treat chronic illnesses like epilepsy and diabetes. Increased co-payments can limit options for such patients. Charles Ornstein discusses what consumers can do to avoid higher prices.
 
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    SixEstate

  • Brand Journalism That Rejects Page Views

    Katie McCaskey
    15 Oct 2014 | 12:45 pm
    At present the focus of much brand journalism is on page views: how to track them, increase them, and lengthen engagement time. After all, if journalism is supporting a brand’s mission, doesn’t it make sense to aggressively get as many eyeballs as possible? Not necessarily, suggests a new venture called Latterly. The “kickstarter journalism” startup will focus on a niche audience paying a small fee every month to read a very narrowly focused reporting. In the words of VentureBeat’s Jordan Novet, Latterly “doesn’t care about page views one bit.”…
  • Brand Journalism in an Age of Responsive Design

    Katie McCaskey
    9 Oct 2014 | 12:26 pm
    What’s black, white, and red all over? A newspaper, goes the old joke. Within the context of digital ink our question is now, what’s next? Not so long ago “what’s next” was responsive design. No more. “Responsive design” describes the ability for a webpage to be viewed across multiple devices, for example, from laptop, to phone, to tablet. While that’s been convenient for delivering news and media to multiple devices it has unintentionally caused a problem — a design problem. The problem is that most websites use the same template over…
  • Brand Journalism, Then and Now

    Katie McCaskey
    15 Sep 2014 | 4:00 am
    “Brand journalism is not brand-centric, but a brand journalist’s job includes figuring out how to seamlessly weave in a brand presence.” That’s Tip #6 in this chipper video about the “now” of branded, err, make that un-branded content. Marketing professionals are increasingly accepting that un-branded content is the way forward. As summarized by MediaSource, the makers of this video: [We can] expand your story by developing meaningful content and delivering real journalism that can be leveraged across both company-owned and earned media. Evolution of Brand…
  • Like-Gating and SSL: Changes Loom From Google and Facebook

    George Williams
    9 Sep 2014 | 4:00 am
    Planning a Facebook promotion to increase your likes? You may want to do some research first. Facebook has updated developer policies and is implementing a ban on incentives to like a Facebook page. Here are the paragraphs of note: You must not incentivize people to use social plugins or to like a Page. This includes offering rewards, or gating apps or app content based on whether or not a person has liked a Page. It remains acceptable to incentivize people to login to your app, checkin at a place or enter a promotion on your app’s Page. To ensure quality connections and help businesses…
  • ‘Journopreneurs,’ Native Advertising, and Brand Journalism

    Katie McCaskey
    7 Aug 2014 | 4:00 am
    Native advertising? Shouldn’t there be a more politically correct term for it? As a John Oliver fan (see: net neutrality), I was pleased to discover he recently covered “native advertising.” I favor Oliver’s researched comedy and was eager to see his take on it. In his sketch, “native content” refers to both overt product placement and less transparent sponsored material. Or, in a phrase, “corporate influence.” As Jason Abbruzzese summarizes: “Many critics argue, as Oliver does, that at best native advertising is a form of trickery and at…
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    Joe Gullo

  • 5 Ways to Protect Yourself Against Online Harassment

    Joe Gullo
    24 Oct 2014 | 6:30 am
    A survey from Pew Research Center found that 40% have experienced online harassment. The chart outlines the types of harassment experienced online and is broken down by age and gender. Gray is all Internet users, light blue is men (18-24), and dark blue is women (18-24). Data: Pew Research Center  Add This to Your Site Some key findings from the report found that young adults (18-24) were likely than any other age group to experience harassment and young women (18-24) were more likely to experience severe types of harassment. Severe types of harassment include being stalked online,…
  • Why You Shouldn’t Just Question the News During Breaking News

    Joe Gullo
    23 Oct 2014 | 6:30 am
    Depending on the subject matter, breaking news is a sensitive, Many times, during breaking news, news agencies are reporting on changing and evolving situations. Having been in breaking news situations, all of varying degree, it’s tedious and challenging work. For example, social media is both helpful, but can become a source of inaccurate reports and information. As news and information came out about the fatal Ottawa Parliment shooting, I came across this Tweet from On the Media about consuming breaking news information: Keep advice from the Breaking News Consumers’ Handbook in…
  • 9 Common Social Media Marketing Mistakes

    Joe Gullo
    22 Oct 2014 | 6:21 am
    Social media marketing is complex and challenging. By avoiding common marketing mistakes, businesses and brands can create effective social media marketing campaigns. Jason Squires created an infographic outlining the 9 common social media marketing mistakes. The one common mistake that stands out is focusing on follower quantity and not quality. Social media is not solely designed to drive traffic to your website or products. It’s about building relationships, community, and creating brand awareness. When we focus on the community of our social media profiles, our posting strategy…
  • Seeing Tweets From People You Don’t Know? That’s Just Twitter Experimenting

    Joe Gullo
    20 Oct 2014 | 6:24 am
    Are you seeing tweets from people you don’t know? That’s just Twitter experimenting. “We believe that each successful experiment, big or small, can make your Twitter experience simpler and more relevant to you.” Twitter formally announced on their blog and Twitter account their plans to add “interesting and entertaining” tweets onto users timelines. <blockquote class=”twitter-tweet” data-cards=”hidden” lang=”en”> We’re testing & exploring ways to include Tweets in your timeline we think you’ll find…
  • Fall Leaves on a Tree

    Joe Gullo
    19 Oct 2014 | 3:57 pm
    Shot this photo yesterday of fall leaves on a tree. Believe it or not there are still some trees, like this one, that still has quite a bit of leaves on it. The post Fall Leaves on a Tree appeared first on Joe Gullo.
 
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    The Hungry and Foolish

  • AT&T Locks Apple SIM to Their Network

    Kevin Wild
    24 Oct 2014 | 7:14 pm
    Carriers, by definition, are a necessary evil.Permalink
  • The iPad Air 2 Review

    Kevin Wild
    22 Oct 2014 | 8:23 pm
    I didn't pick up an iPad Air 2, but nonetheless, I was interested to see what John Gruber had to say about the new changes (especially considering he is a fan of the 'left-behind' iPad Mini).What I found most interesting about the iPad Air 2 is how much Apple was able to push performance forward:The iPad is no longer following in the wake of the iPhone, performance- and specs-wise. It’s forging ahead. With 2 GB of RAM, it’s a year ahead of the iPhone (we hope) in that department. Performance-wise it’s fast enough to replace a MacBook Air for many, many people.I truly believe this is the…
  • The Difference 30 Years Makes

    Kevin Wild
    22 Oct 2014 | 8:15 pm
    It's easy to see how far technology has come when looking back:When first released in 1984, the Apple Macintosh shipped with a black-and-white 512 x 342 display. Fast forward 30 years to the release of the iMac with Retina 5K display, which ships with a 5,120 x 2,880 display with support for millions of colours. That’s an increase from 175,000 pixels to more than 14.7 million – an 8,400% increase. 80 of the original Macintosh displays fit within a single Retina 5K display.Just amazing.Permalink
  • The SIM Card Is About To Die

    Kevin Wild
    19 Oct 2014 | 4:40 pm
    Finally, with the iPad Air 2 and mini 3, Apple has decided to start making its move by using a reprogrammable SIM that can be taken from carrier to carrier, switching networks and pricing plans through user-friendly software alone.Within a year or two, you'll probably never see a SIM card in an Apple product again. You may not even see a tray.We can only hope.Permalink
  • iOS 8.1 Available For Download Tomorrow

    Kevin Wild
    19 Oct 2014 | 4:35 pm
    I don't know about you guys, but I'll be waiting a few minutes before updating this time.Permalink
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    Bryan Smith

  • My Changing Views On Tech

    Bryan Smith
    12 Oct 2014 | 11:16 am
    As a tech-writer, I'm acutely aware of the fanboy wars which rage across the internet. I've never much subscribed to them. I have always felt that I should be most interested in the brand that, to me, offers the best products. For a great deal of time, that was Apple, and it was a good run. But, let's be frank, that's no longer.
  • Violence in Vrygrond: Taxi violence erupts, roads closed

    Bryan Smith
    16 Sep 2014 | 10:58 am
    Early morning on Tuesday the 16th of September saw a series of armed protests occur on Vrygrond Avenue, reaching into Prince George Drive and Oudevlei road, in Muizenberg, Cape Town. Demonstrators, toyi-toying in the Vrygrond Ave. and Prince George intersection, pelted police and the vehicles of residents with stones, lit rubber tyre barricades, and fired […]
  • Week In Quotes: May 2 – May 15

    Bryan Smith
    15 May 2014 | 11:26 am
    “It is the ministers’ view that the public protector’s report and the investigation she conducted trespass on the separation of powers doctrine and… Section 198(d) of the Constitution which vests national security in Parliament and national executive,” – Acting Chief Executive Officer of the Government Communication and Information System, Phumla Williams, on the decision for […]
  • Evening at Zandvlei: A Photo Essay

    Bryan Smith
    12 May 2014 | 12:00 am
    Filed under: News
  • Week In Quotes: March 15 – May 2

    Bryan Smith
    2 May 2014 | 10:58 am
    “The ANC was voted in, now there is a chance to vote the ANC out. There is no other way.” – Democratic Alliance Western Cape Premier Helen Zille, whilst campaigning for the upcoming May 7th National Election “The search will take probably in the order of eight months, maybe eight to 12 months if we […]
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