Journalism

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  • Al Jazeera America struggles to get off the margins

    Columbia Journalism Review
    20 Aug 2014 | 4:50 am
    When Al Jazeera, the Qatar-based cable news giant rolled out its massive new American affiliate one year ago, creating a full-force 24-hour cable news channel—800 journalists, several studios, support staff, the works— in a move that drew cheers, skepticism, but mostly puzzlement: why? Another cable news channel? Aren't there too many already? Al Jazeera America's CEO, Ehab Al Shihabi, an...
  • What could social journalism do for Ferguson?

    BuzzMachine
    Jeff Jarvis
    16 Aug 2014 | 9:37 am
    It took too long, but finally the attention of American journalism turned to Ferguson. Is the crush and focus of network cameras and big-paper reporters helping Ferguson or exploiting its struggle? The answer to that is obvious; see, for example, Newtown. The better, more constructive question is: How could journalism help the residents of Ferguson? The rationale behind our new, proposed M.A. in Social Journalism at CUNY — the thinking behind my argument that journalism must see itself as a service — is that journalism should start by listening, not speaking. It should start with…
  • Fox's Rivera: Obama's "Biggest Failing ... Is Not Assuming The Role" Of "Surrogate Dad For Urban Families"

    Media Matters for America - Latest Items
    19 Aug 2014 | 9:58 am
    From the August 19 edition of Fox News' Outnumbered:Previously: Fox's Rivera Claims He "Was Right About The Hoodie": Trayvon Martin Was Attacked Because "He Was Wearing Thug Wear" Fox's Geraldo Rivera Reverses Course On Use Of The Word "Thug" Fox's Geraldo Rivera: "You Dress Like A Thug, People Are Going To Treat You Like A Thug. That's True. I Stand By That."
  • Getting Groovy With Reactive Android

    Open
    By MOHIT PANDEY
    18 Aug 2014 | 11:16 am
    “Slow,” a word no one ever wants to see associated with their app. Delay and lag of as little as 100–200 milliseconds will be perceived by users as poor, slow performance. Keeping long running tasks on the main thread will result in that perception, the dreaded “Application Not Responding” (ANR) and a bad user experience. This leaves us developers one choice: concurrent execution of code. The recent growth in popularity of functional programming is well deserved. As things become more asynchronous, the functional model really fits well. Being able to sequence, chain and transform…
  • E-Books & Self-Publishing Roundup, August 19, 2014

    Mediashift
    Julie Keck
    19 Aug 2014 | 8:04 am
    1. 1,000 European authors sign open letter to Amazon over e-books (Carolyn Kellogg / LA Times) 2. Inkshares looks to marry the old with the new (Clare Swanson / Publishers Weekly) 3. Blurb branches out to low-cost trade books, e-books and mass distribution via Ingram (Jackie Dove / The Next Web) 4. 10 truths about self-publishing for entrepreneurs with a book idea (Kimanzi Constable / Entrepreneur) 5. 3 common mistakes to avoid when publishing a book app (Karen Robertson / Digital Book World)   Get our newsletters delivered straight to your inbox.
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    Columbia Journalism Review

  • Al Jazeera America struggles to get off the margins

    20 Aug 2014 | 4:50 am
    When Al Jazeera, the Qatar-based cable news giant rolled out its massive new American affiliate one year ago, creating a full-force 24-hour cable news channel—800 journalists, several studios, support staff, the works— in a move that drew cheers, skepticism, but mostly puzzlement: why? Another cable news channel? Aren't there too many already? Al Jazeera America's CEO, Ehab Al Shihabi, an...
  • Apple can't hide from a 20-year-old reporter

    19 Aug 2014 | 12:50 pm
    The best-sourced reporter covering Apple Inc., one of the world’s most secretive companies, is a 20-year-old junior at the University of Michigan. His name is Mark Gurman. He makes more than six figures a year as senior editor and scoop master at 9to5Mac.com, a news outlet most people have never heard of. In the interest of truth, which Gurman is...
  • Facebook to Onion readers: They're just kidding

    19 Aug 2014 | 8:38 am
    Satire on Facebook now comes with a disclosure. Click on an Onion article in a Facebook News Feed, and the related headlines from the same site that pop up beneath will now be prefaced with “[Satire].” The same does not apply to posts on Facebook timelines, including The Onion’s page. According to Facebook, the feature has been tested for a...
  • The media's growing interest in how animals think

    19 Aug 2014 | 4:50 am
    Tip the elephant arrived in New York to accolades and fanfare--until things went wrong. A few years into his stay in the Central Park Zoo, the elephant began display strange bouts of anger and a mercurial personality. After several attempts to maul his caretaker, who had become convinced that the animal was hell-bent on his assassination, park commissioners deemed Tip...
  • Why words have multiple acceptable spellings

    18 Aug 2014 | 12:50 pm
    Last week, we talked about the new, fifth edition of Webster's New World College Dictionary, and some things in it that changed or stayed the same. Mark Allen, a freelance editor who writes frequently for Copyediting magazine, commented that "My biggest surprise was almost all the entries in the AP Stylebook that note an 'exception to Webster's New World' still...
 
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    BuzzMachine

  • What could social journalism do for Ferguson?

    Jeff Jarvis
    16 Aug 2014 | 9:37 am
    It took too long, but finally the attention of American journalism turned to Ferguson. Is the crush and focus of network cameras and big-paper reporters helping Ferguson or exploiting its struggle? The answer to that is obvious; see, for example, Newtown. The better, more constructive question is: How could journalism help the residents of Ferguson? The rationale behind our new, proposed M.A. in Social Journalism at CUNY — the thinking behind my argument that journalism must see itself as a service — is that journalism should start by listening, not speaking. It should start with…
  • What society are we building here?

    Jeff Jarvis
    14 Aug 2014 | 5:35 pm
    There is no single solution to the plague of trolls, abusers, harassers, lunatics, imposters, and assholes online any more than there is on earth: no one algorithm, no one company rule, no one regulation will do it all, though they can help. The most powerful weapon in any case is our own norms as a society. What exactly are our norms online? And what are we — you, yes you, and I — doing to establish and enforce our standards as an online society? Anything? Twitter, Facebook, and other platforms bear responsibility. But so do we all. I cannot imagine any civilized being who is not…
  • Unoriginal sin

    Jeff Jarvis
    14 Aug 2014 | 9:42 am
    The amazing Ethan Zuckerman argues at eloquent length in The Atlantic that advertising was the web’s original sin, which really is just a corollary to the contention that giving away content for free on the web (and supporting it with advertising) was newspapers’ and magazines’ original sin. I’m going to disagree. What bothers Ethan, I think, is not advertising but mass media economics — which, I will agree, do not fit on the net. And the solution that preachers against this sin bless — consumer payment — brings with it a host of unintended and…
  • Absolution? Hell, no

    Jeff Jarvis
    11 Aug 2014 | 5:05 am
    The good Reverend David Carr grants us absolution. “So whose fault is it?” he asks after chronicling the excommunication of newspapers and magazines from media companies casting off their old, print ancestors to starve and die. “No one’s,” Carr decrees. Not so fast, preacher. It is our fault. Who else could be at fault? We journalists, publishers, and journalism schools have turned out to be irresponsible stewards of journalism. We squandered our trust and our cash flow. This was was our institution to nurture and protect and Carr says it’s all but dead.
  • Come reinvent TV news

    Jeff Jarvis
    7 Aug 2014 | 2:06 pm
    We’re going to reinvent TV news at CUNY on Sept. 19. Or rather, you will. Do you have a wild vision for what TV news could or should be? Send it our way and you would win $1,000 and present your idea to an audience of TV people and TV disruptors at CUNY’s Graduate School of Journalism on Sept. 19. You’ll be joining some innovators we know and have invited to the event to present their visions for TV’s possibilities: The conditions for everyone: You can’t present anything you’ve already done. You have to show something you (or your organizations)…
 
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    Open

  • Getting Groovy With Reactive Android

    By MOHIT PANDEY
    18 Aug 2014 | 11:16 am
    “Slow,” a word no one ever wants to see associated with their app. Delay and lag of as little as 100–200 milliseconds will be perceived by users as poor, slow performance. Keeping long running tasks on the main thread will result in that perception, the dreaded “Application Not Responding” (ANR) and a bad user experience. This leaves us developers one choice: concurrent execution of code. The recent growth in popularity of functional programming is well deserved. As things become more asynchronous, the functional model really fits well. Being able to sequence, chain and transform…
  • Build an Open Source Community Platform With New York Times, Washington Post and Mozilla

    By GREG BARBER
    7 Aug 2014 | 12:18 pm
    Each year, Knight-Mozilla OpenNews selects developers, technologists, civic hackers and data crunchers to spend 10 months working as fellows embedded in their partner newsrooms. Fellowships are paid positions, and emphasize open source development that strengthens specific newsrooms and the larger journalism-code community. The search for the 2015 Knight-Mozilla Fellows is now open, and the deadline for applications is Aug. 16, 2014. Staffers from The New York Times, Mozilla OpenNews and The Washington Post are seeking two fellows to join their community platform collaboration. This is their…
  • EMR Streaming in Go

    By JP ROBINSON
    10 Jul 2014 | 8:38 am
    On our platform teams, we use Amazon’s Elastic MapReduce (EMR) service to help us gather useful metrics from log files. We have processes that capture log files, then compress and push them to Amazon S3 for archiving. This pattern builds up massive amounts of information going back several years and, thanks to EMR, it’s all available to us for data crunching. Initially, we used Python for a lot of the heavy lifting, but over time we came to rely on Go. In the Beginning When we first started using EMR, my team wrote the mapper and reducer scripts in Python. We chose Python because it…
  • Improving Article Accessibility

    By CLINT FISHER
    24 Jun 2014 | 8:38 am
    With the redesign and replatform of NYTimes.com in January, we introduced many new features on our article pages. Unfortunately, for our users with disabilities who rely on assistive technology, the new features hindered usability. Before the article redesign, most of our assistive technology users went to our print preview version, which contained only the article text, to avoid having their screen readers interrupted by content outside of the flow of the article. By removing the print preview feature (the redesign allowed us to leverage the print capabilities of modern browsers to improve…
  • Scoop: A Glimpse Into the NYTimes CMS

    By LUKE VNENCHAK
    17 Jun 2014 | 11:15 am
    You know the importance of technology to the future of journalism has become a widely accepted fact when a prominent editor decides to join a new company because of its content management system. That’s what Ezra Klein told The New York Times about his decision to leave The Washington Post for Vox Media, a digital publisher with a fancy, custom-built CMS. Klein couldn’t quite describe what made the Vox system so special, but the fact that a journalist said he loved, let alone even tolerated, his CMS was all you needed to know that the world has changed. Suddenly, the CMS, an often derided…
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    Mediashift

  • E-Books & Self-Publishing Roundup, August 19, 2014

    Julie Keck
    19 Aug 2014 | 8:04 am
    1. 1,000 European authors sign open letter to Amazon over e-books (Carolyn Kellogg / LA Times) 2. Inkshares looks to marry the old with the new (Clare Swanson / Publishers Weekly) 3. Blurb branches out to low-cost trade books, e-books and mass distribution via Ingram (Jackie Dove / The Next Web) 4. 10 truths about self-publishing for entrepreneurs with a book idea (Kimanzi Constable / Entrepreneur) 5. 3 common mistakes to avoid when publishing a book app (Karen Robertson / Digital Book World)   Get our newsletters delivered straight to your inbox.
  • Daily Must Reads, August 19, 2014

    Julie Keck
    19 Aug 2014 | 8:00 am
    1. How St. Louis’ alt-weekly is covering the chaos in Ferguson (Benjamin Mullin / Poynter) 2. The newest important person in newsrooms: audience-development czars (Lucia Moses / Digiday) 3. Simple.tv now lets you share your DVR recordings with your cord-cutting friends (Janko Roettgers / GigaOm) 4. How Deca is taking a collaborative approach to longform (Abigail Edge / Journalism.co.uk) 5. The future of mobile apps for news (Frédéric Filloux / Monday Note)   Get our newsletters delivered straight to your inbox.
  • The Guardian’s Contributoria Takes Off, Mixing Collaboration, Crowdfunding and Print

    Angela Washeck
    19 Aug 2014 | 3:00 am
    Matt McAlister, who serves as director of digital strategy at Guardian Media Group, had a vision for collaborative, crowdfunded journalism that would facilitate two different kinds of communities. That vision has become Contributoria, which allows independent writers to pitch stories that are supported by people who like their ideas. And the finished result ends up not just online — but in a popular print magazine. Matt McAlister So many crowdfunding efforts for independent journalists have tried and failed in the past, from Spot.us onward, so what can Contributoria add that others…
  • Daily Must Reads, August 18, 2014

    Julie Keck
    18 Aug 2014 | 7:26 am
    1. View of #Ferguson thrust Michael Brown shooting to national attention (David Carr / The New York Times) 2. In exposing followers, Medium fails readers (Selena Larson / ReadWrite) 3. The problem with the police’s plea to ‘Tweet Smart’ (Monica Guzman / GeekWire) 4. Reddit, Imgur and Twitch team up as ‘Derp’ for social data research (The Guardian) 5. For its new shows, Amazon adds art to its data (Emily Steel / The New York Times) 6. Web therapy could be an option for bipolar disorder (Liat Clark / Ars Technica)   Get our newsletters delivered straight to your inbox.
  • Inside ‘The 9/11 Project’: How Visual Storytelling Helped Tell Children’s Stories

    Meagan Doll
    18 Aug 2014 | 3:00 am
    Though “9/11 Stories: The Children,” an iBook produced by Rutgers University, began as an ordinary conversation between two seasoned journalists, the multimedia package consists of all but ordinary conversations. The iBook comes after a 9/11 Project course was offered in the spring of 2011, first imagined by former Rutgers professor Ron Miskoff and New Jersey Press Association Executive Director George White in a hotel lobby. A grant from the NJPA allowed Miskoff and co-author Liz Fuerst to conduct the narrative journalism class in exchange for the content it produced and came…
 
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    Digidave

  • Nothing is in a name when we attack industry tribes

    Digidave
    1 Aug 2014 | 1:43 pm
    There’s no need to defend “entrepreneurial journalism” because it doesn’t exist Is anyone else tired of pointless journalist on journalist attacks? They persist because of the labels/divisions we create amongst ourselves. Most of these labels are meaningless outside of our industry. It’s tribalism at its worst. In the end — we are on the same team. How different types of journalists see each other (From my most popular blog post ever) I did an eye-roll when I came across Corey Pein’s piece in the Baffler: “Amway Journalism.” The tl;dr version: He doesn’t like…
  • The San Francisco Public Press – the news nonprofit that could

    Digidave
    25 Jun 2014 | 2:37 pm
    I’m on the board of the San Francisco Public Press. I’ve been associated with them since the beginning and helped raise a ton of money for them while I was running Spot.Us. They currently have a Kickstarter up. They are past their original goal, but they have an opportunity to make more. If they get to 500 donors (even if the donor just gives $1) the Knight Foundation will contribute 5k over their Kickstarter goal. If they get to 750: they’ll throw in $7,500 and if they get to 1,000 contributors, even if they just give $1- the Knight Foundation will give them $10,000 over…
  • A new metric to count in News: The follow – #jcarn

    Digidave
    23 Jun 2014 | 7:00 am
    This month’s Carnival of Journalism is hosted by Prof. Jonathan Groves. You can read the full blog post from Jonathan here: What is the best way of measuring meaningful content?  For this month’s prompt, I [Jonathan] offer two related questions: How do you define meaningful content that has long-lasting value? What is the best way to evaluate content that fosters deep engagement with the audience? I am cheating a bit by re-blogging (with some a bit of an intro) a post that I wrote for Circa’s blog about this very subject. The key thing to keep in mind about Circa is that…
  • The @HiddenCash Twitter phenomenon is bullshit

    Digidave
    30 May 2014 | 1:52 pm
    In recent weeks the Twitter account @HiddenCash has received several hundred thousand followers. As of writing this, it’s over 345K. And most of the feedback it has received is positive. I hate to be the old-timey Scrouge to the loveable Scrouge McDuck that is this account, but I think it’s bullshit. Considering the class tensions in San Francisco, this kind of social experiment is not what the city needs. It is tone deaf.  The Premise The premise is clever, no doubt. An anonymous rich person hides envelopes of money ($100-$200) and hides them. The Twitter account provides…
  • Defining Product: The next decade long battle of journalism

    Digidave
    15 May 2014 | 10:58 am
    The tagline for my blog since roughly 2008 has been: “Journalism is a process, not a product.” I believe in this to my core. Journalism itself is not a product. When the main product sold was a newspaper – that was not journalism. That was the final product that contained the finished journalism. Journalism, as many have described before, is the process of collecting, filtering and distributing information with the caveats that the information is true and accurate to the best of one’s ability (and perhaps other caveats of ethically collected, etc). This is why there is truth to…
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    Newspaper Death Watch

  • The Bots are Coming!

    Paul Gillin
    5 Aug 2014 | 9:04 am
    On one level we can understand the teeth-gnashing that follow the Associated Press’ announcement that it plans to start using robots to write the majority of U.S. corporate earnings stories. Robots seem to bring out the Luddite in all of us. What we can’t understand is why anyone outside of a few shop stewards should want to preserve the jobs that will invariably be lost to this new kind of automation. Actually, the AP says no jobs will be eliminated. “This is about using technology to free journalists to do more journalism and less data processing, not about eliminating jobs,” wrote…
  • What if The New York Times Went Weekly?

    Paul Gillin
    6 Jul 2014 | 6:50 am
    Steve Outing The leaked “innovation” report from The New York Times that made the rounds in May recommends that the company take more risks, move more quickly and consider radical steps to reinvent itself. Steve Outing wonders what would happen if the Times abandoned daily print editions, and he’s built an elaborate “what-if?” model to test the idea. Outing’s model doesn’t answer the question, but it does provide a new tool with which to evaluate options. “Most news companies aren’t very good at grokking what’s coming at them or…
  • Across the Globe, Newspaper Industry is Actually Growing

    Paul Gillin
    17 Jun 2014 | 1:31 pm
    Observers of the cratering newspaper industries in the US and Europe may be surprised at this news: Print newspaper circulation around the world actually increased 2% in 2013 compared to 2012. The pocket of strength comes from rapidly maturing economies in Asia and Latin America, where people who a generation ago might have used newspapers mainly for kindling are now finding them to be valuable for the purposes for which they were intended. That’s the highlights from the latest World Press Trends survey, which was released last by the World Association of Newspapers and News Publishers. The…
  • A Graphical View of Newspaper Innovation

    Paul Gillin
    29 May 2014 | 3:33 am
    The Newspaper Association of America (NAA) was in denial during the early years of the industry’s crash, but lately the organization has been doing good work to highlight the new spirit of innovation that is taking hold across its membership. As the numbers in this infographic demonstrate, U.S. newspapers have a lot to be proud of. They reached 145 million unique visitors in January alone and the Washington Post and New York Times each drove more than a quarter-million tweets each week. One of the things we like most about this infographic is the attribution. Go to the page on the NAA…
  • The New York Times Gives Itself a Good Thrashing

    Paul Gillin
    19 May 2014 | 11:02 am
    A speech in The New York Times newsroom after the announcement of the 2009 Pulitzer Prize winners (Photo credit: Wikipedia) We finally got a chance to read through the 96-page “Innovation” report commissioned by the management of The New York Times and leaked last week in the wake of the firing of Executive Editor Jill Abramson on Tuesday. Joshua Benton at Nieman Journalism Lab has already called the report “one of the most remarkable documents” he’s seen in his tenure, and detailed coverage has appeared on BuzzFeed, Mashable and numerous other outlets. We won’t go into detail…
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    Holovaty.com

  • How to solve CORS IE font issues with Amazon Cloudfront

    Adrian Holovaty
    25 Jul 2014 | 3:42 pm
    I've been wrestling with this for a while, and I finally found a fix! Here's a quick post for developers searching for the solution... The problem If you use Amazon Cloudfront to serve web fonts (.ttf, .woff, .eot, etc.) from your Amazon S3 bucket (as I do for Soundslice), Internet Explorer will likely refuse to load the fonts, giving this error message: CSS3117: @font-face failed cross-origin request. Resource access is restricted. This happens because your media files on Cloudfront are on a separate domain than your site, and Internet Explorer doesn't like the cross-domain requests for…
  • Announcing the Soundslice sheet music player

    Adrian Holovaty
    17 Mar 2014 | 12:04 pm
    Since PJ and I launched Soundslice in November 2012, our top-most requested feature has been support for sheet music. We've spent the last six months building that for you, and we launched it today. Have a look at the demo. Here's a quick video I recorded showing off some of the features and benefits: Lots of stuff is new here: We now render sheet music (aka standard notation), not just tabs and chord charts. Instead of scrolling horizontally (example of old site), the UI is now vertically oriented. This makes it much easier to see upcoming notes, and it's a much more natural experience. The…
  • Why Chicago needs to stop playing by Silicon Valley’s rules

    Adrian Holovaty
    24 Jan 2014 | 12:25 pm
    I gave a talk yesterday at the Chicago Startup Forecast. Here's a rough transcript, with slides. This is Daniel Burnham. He was a famous Chicago architect, responsible for some of our city's most beautiful buildings. He's known for his influential Plan of Chicago, which foresaw modern city planning, and he was a key organizer of the World's Columbian Exposition, also known as the Chicago World's Fair of 1893. Chicago beat out New York, DC and St. Louis for the privilege of hosting that World's Fair. Back in those days, world's fairs were more common than they are now. In 1889, a few years…
  • Adrian and Jacob retiring as Django BDFLs

    Adrian Holovaty
    13 Jan 2014 | 7:30 am
    Since July 2005, when Django was open-sourced, Jacob Kaplan-Moss and I have been the two Benevolent Dictators For Life (BDFLs) of the project. Today we're both retiring from our formal BDFL roles, given that (1) we don't have the time for it that we once had and (2) Django is in great shape with a vibrant community of contributors. A BDFL, a term originally used by Python creator Guido van Rossum, is basically a leader of an open-source project who resolves disputes and has final say on big decisions. In the early days, circa 2004-2008, Jacob and I had to make a fair amount of decisions, and…
  • Google+ and YouTube tech disaster report

    Adrian Holovaty
    17 Nov 2013 | 12:02 pm
    The Google+ / YouTube integration is a disaster. Much has been written about this in the last few days, with people making great points about the value of anonymity and the poor new comment-ranking algorithms. Here's a good roundup of the various issues. These are fantastic points, and I agree with them 100%. But they're fundamentally matters of philosophy. Whether real names are required in comments, whether a Google+ account is required to post comments/videos to YouTube, and how comments should be ranked/sorted — these are all judgment calls made by YouTube's developers and product…
 
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    JackLail.com

  • Evolving is a painful process

    Jack Lail
    17 Aug 2014 | 10:20 am
    For many, working at a newspaper doesn't seem all that fun anymore. Chas Sisk had had enough. The Tennessean had just fired Sisk and the entire staff of the paper the day before and asked them to reapply for their jobs. The reorganization was announced in the paper by executive editor Stefanie Murray as a "bold step forward in our evolution." The Nashville Scene
  • The old and the new

    Jack Lail
    1 Aug 2014 | 2:08 pm
    The old knoxnews (a design in use for just over seven years) and the new design, launched July 22, 2014. The old site was on the "Ellington" platform; the new one uses "Endplay." What's up with the German ads? We use a screenshot service whose ip addresses are in Germany. (Click on the image for a larger view.)
  • Good reads on the large life of John Seigenthaler

    Jack Lail
    12 Jul 2014 | 5:56 pm
    (Journalists John Quinn and John Seigenthaler chatting at the First Amendment Center in Nashville, Tennessee, in 2010.) Some good pieces on the large life of John Seigenthaler New York Times: John Seigenthaler, Editor and Aide to Politicians, Dies at 86 Ken Paulson (in USA Today): Seigenthaler a champion of First Amendment The Tennessean: John Seigenthaler, longtime Tennessean editor, dies at 86 NPR: Newspaper Editor, Activist John Seigenthaler Dies At 86 Poynter: John Seigenthaler was a leader of free speech, civil rights and journalism Nashville Scene: Remembering the late John…
  • Reaction to the death of John Seigenthaler

    Jack Lail
    11 Jul 2014 | 7:05 pm
    [View the story "Reaction to John Seigenthaler's death" on Storify]
  • Another year, another year older

    Jack Lail
    16 May 2014 | 12:50 pm
    Researcher Greg Harmon of Borrell Associates says the average age of a print newspaper reader is 57 and the average newspaper web visitor is 51.  Saying the industry's aging demographics ought to have "everyone's hair on fire," Harmon notes that newspaper readers have been getting a year older every year for more than a decade.  -- Alan D. Mutter
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    sans serif

  • ‘Being a South Indian, his Hindi was immaculate’

    churumuri
    18 Aug 2014 | 5:34 am
    sans serif records the demise of J.V. Raman, the Delhi University economics professor who read the news in Hindi, on Doordarshan, back in the days when the state-owned channel was the only TV news vehicle. Mr Raman taught at the capital’s Rajdhani College, whose website proudly records that he was among the college teachers associated with the media. A blog post on Doordarshan’s newsreaders recorded Mr Raman thus: “Let’s now come to some male Hindi newsreaders. And the most iconic of them would be J V Raman. Being a South Indian, his Hindi was immaculate. Thick…
  • Why NaMo shouldn’t take media on foreign trips

    churumuri
    13 Aug 2014 | 10:51 pm
    Prime Minister Manmohan Singh addresses the media on the way back home from the United States in October 2013. There were 34 journalists on that junket. As Indian journalists come to terms with a Narendra Modi dispensation that doesn’t want to court them or take them on foreign junkets, K.P. Nayar, the former Washington correspondent of The Telegraph, Calcutta, writes that the US administration is no better. Each correspondent who accompanied US president Barack Obama on his trip to India had to shell out $8,400 (approximately Rs 500,000) in air fare, plus an additional $2,500 (Rs…
  • India’s first woman journalist Vidya Munshi, RIP

    churumuri
    9 Jul 2014 | 4:59 am
    sans serif records the demise of Vidya Munshi, arguably India’s first woman journalist, in Calcutta on Monday, 7 July 2014.  She was 94 years old. Born in Bombay, she worked in several newspapers and magazines, including a ten-year stint with Russy Karanjia‘s Blitz. A 2006 profile of Ms Munshi in The Telegraph, Calcutta, noted: “At that time (1952-62), she was the Calcutta correspondent of Blitz, a Bombay weekly critical of government policies and excelling in investigative journalism. “One of her ‘scoops’ was on two Canadian pilots who were to fly from Hong Kong…
  • In ‘The Last Mag’, Nishant Patel is Fareed Zakaria

    churumuri
    2 Jul 2014 | 4:45 am
    DILIP CHAWARE writes from New Jersey: The Last Magazine is Michael Hastings’s novel which has been published a year after his death. This controversial young journalist, who worked for Newsweek as a war correspondent, died last year in a car accident in Los Angeles when he was just 33. Very few were aware about this book, which was resurrected from his laptop. The novel, though, is a portrayal of real life within a major news organisation, the nexus between the government and the media and broadly discusses the relevance and future of the print medium. Hastings is back in the news owing to…
  • A rash I&B ministry “advisory” to TV, print media

    churumuri
    26 Jun 2014 | 4:05 am
    When he was health minister in the UPA’s first term, Anbumani Ramadoss made it mandatory for movies and TV channels to show the statutory warning against smoking and drinking each time someone on screen lit a cigarette or sipped a drink. The Telegraph reports that the NDA’s information and broadcasting ministry under Prakash Javadekar has shot off an “advisory” to TV stations and newspapers “against portraying or “glorifying” rash or dangerous driving, as well as helmet-less riding and a failure to fasten car seatbelts.” “All TV channels/ Doordarshan/…
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    JackLail.com

  • Evolving is a painful process

    Jack Lail
    17 Aug 2014 | 10:20 am
    For many, working at a newspaper doesn't seem all that fun anymore. Chas Sisk had had enough. The Tennessean had just fired Sisk and the entire staff of the paper the day before and asked them to reapply for their jobs. The reorganization was announced in the paper by executive editor Stefanie Murray as a "bold step forward in our evolution." The Nashville Scene
  • The old and the new

    Jack Lail
    1 Aug 2014 | 2:08 pm
    The old knoxnews (a design in use for just over seven years) and the new design, launched July 22, 2014. The old site was on the "Ellington" platform; the new one uses "Endplay." What's up with the German ads? We use a screenshot service whose ip addresses are in Germany. (Click on the image for a larger view.)
  • Good reads on the large life of John Seigenthaler

    Jack Lail
    12 Jul 2014 | 5:56 pm
    (Journalists John Quinn and John Seigenthaler chatting at the First Amendment Center in Nashville, Tennessee, in 2010.) Some good pieces on the large life of John Seigenthaler New York Times: John Seigenthaler, Editor and Aide to Politicians, Dies at 86 Ken Paulson (in USA Today): Seigenthaler a champion of First Amendment The Tennessean: John Seigenthaler, longtime Tennessean editor, dies at 86 NPR: Newspaper Editor, Activist John Seigenthaler Dies At 86 Poynter: John Seigenthaler was a leader of free speech, civil rights and journalism Nashville Scene: Remembering the late John…
  • Reaction to the death of John Seigenthaler

    Jack Lail
    11 Jul 2014 | 7:05 pm
    [View the story "Reaction to John Seigenthaler's death" on Storify]
  • Another year, another year older

    Jack Lail
    16 May 2014 | 12:50 pm
    Researcher Greg Harmon of Borrell Associates says the average age of a print newspaper reader is 57 and the average newspaper web visitor is 51.  Saying the industry's aging demographics ought to have "everyone's hair on fire," Harmon notes that newspaper readers have been getting a year older every year for more than a decade.  -- Alan D. Mutter
 
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    Technology

  • Government IT projects fail because of politicians, not programmers

    Willard Foxton
    19 Aug 2014 | 5:13 am
      Yesterday, the American company Ratheon was awarded £224 million of British taxpayers' money for a disastrous Home Office IT project called e-Borders. That £224 million represents less than half the total bill of the project, which was scrapped last year. I thought I had lost my capacity to be shocked by IT projects going [...]
  • Shopping online while drunk is like giving yourself an unexpected Christmas present. Who doesn't want that?

    Willard Foxton
    15 Aug 2014 | 3:47 am
    We all have a secret shame. Mine is buying useless things online – usually late at night while drunk. I thought it was just me, that no one else knew the confusion of a large, heavy parcel arriving on their doorstep and carrying it up to their flat thinking: "it must be a gift from [...]
  • I love the BBC, but can it stop locking up poor people?

    Willard Foxton
    13 Aug 2014 | 11:00 pm
    When I worked at the BBC, I was lucky enough to learn my trade under an outstandingly frugal boss. Whenever we asked for anything, he'd always cost it out in terms of how many licence fees the thing in question cost. In particular, he was the scourge of guests asking for special treatment – cars [...]
  • 'Comics Unmasked' at the British Library: the history of a derided art form

    Willard Foxton
    13 Aug 2014 | 2:29 am
    I can't do a much better job of describing the main appeal of the British Library Comics exhibition than a bloke who was standing close to me midway through, who simply exclaimed "Crikey, good drawings". The drawings, which make up the bulk of the British comics on show, dating from the 17th century to the [...]
  • Why you probably trust Wikipedia more than the BBC

    Jamie Bartlett
    12 Aug 2014 | 9:04 am
    A significant moment slipped by this weekend and hardly anyone noticed. Brits now trust Wikipedia, the crowd sourced online encyclopedia, more than the mighty BBC, the independent, professional, national media outlet. A YouGov poll of almost 2,000 British adults found 64 per cent trust Wikipedia entries to tell the truth "a great deal" or "a [...]
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    Idea Lab

  • 5 Tips for Better Collaboration on Media Tech Projects

    Nicole Zhu
    12 Aug 2014 | 3:00 am
    This post originally appeared on Northwestern University Knight Lab’s blog. With code sometimes you have to run before you can walk. Tutorials and W3Schools are great for learning the basics, but at some point you just have to open a blank window in Sublime Text, focus on a project and start writing code from scratch. If you’re like me and aren’t a disciplined runner, it can be hard to keep up the momentum when working on your own. Having teammates keeps you on track and pushes you to work through roadblocks. That said working with others comes with its own set of challenges. In the…
  • Reese News Lab Students Take Their Pitches Outside the School

    Zhai Yun Tan
    6 Aug 2014 | 3:00 am
    “One hour to pitch, guys!” Eight students from Reese News Lab, dressed in their best, were prepared to pitch in the American Underground, the heart of startups in the Triangle. As everyone piled up in the van to leave for the destination nearly 30 minutes away, a jovial mood set in. They seem ready to take on the challenging task of this pitch — which is itself a new experiment by the Lab. It is the first time Reese News Lab has planned its pitch day away from the comfort of the school. This time, not only would the students be pitching in a foreign place, but they would also be facing…
  • How Civic Crowdfunding Can Foster Collaboration Between Cities and Citizens

    Rodrigo Davies
    5 Aug 2014 | 3:00 am
    At the Academy of Management’s Annual Meeting in Philadelphia this week some colleagues and I gave a panel titled Towards Government 2.0: Open Data and Innovation through Cross-Sector Collaboration. We talked about open data, building better and more open government services, and how to foster civic collaboration across sectors. Unfortunately I wasn’t able to be at the meeting in person (I’m in the midst of relocating to San Francisco), so I contributed a video in which I talk about some of the work I’ve done on crowdfunding in cities. how the crowd collaborates…
  • OpenNews: Why Code for a Newsroom Instead of a Startup? (Part 2)

    Dan Sinker
    31 Jul 2014 | 3:00 am
    This week, as part of our search for our 2015 Knight-Mozilla Fellows, who spend 10 months writing open code in the newsroom, we have asked others that develop in the newsroom why they do what they do. The answers — we highlighted a couple in a previous post — are still flowing in, but we wanted to touch on two great ones, both from members of the team at Vox Media. Why develop in a newsroom Lauren Rabaino Lauren Rabaino, a product manager at Vox, outlines 10 compelling reasons to write code in journalism. One hits on the fact that, in journalism, you’re constantly having to…
  • The 8 Types of Journalism Events That Work

    Josh Stearns
    29 Jul 2014 | 3:00 am
    This post originally appeared on the Local News Lab. When you see something working for one news organization, it is tempting to want to replicate that in your own newsroom. But if you duplicate a model wholesale you risk trying something that is not a fit for your organization or your community. There has been a lot of attention paid to how journalists are using events to diversify their revenue streams and engage their communities. But events are not one-size-fits all, and in fact when we drill down and look at how different newsrooms are implementing event strategies we see that the most…
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    Reflections of a Newsosaur

  • How digital retailing could roil local media

    Newsosaur
    13 Aug 2014 | 5:00 am
    Thanks to the growing ubiquity of mobile devices, a digital revolution is about to transform bricks-and-mortar retailing – a fast-breaking phenomenon that potentially poses the biggest challenge yet to the economics of local media companies.  More than four out of five smartphone and tablet owners use their devices for shopping, according to a report issued earlier this year by the Nielsen
  • Are newspapers doomed? It depends.

    Newsosaur
    7 Aug 2014 | 1:12 pm
    Now that every major media company has dumped or soon will jettison its print division, the question I hear every day is: Are newspapers doomed? The answer is neither simple nor universal. But the dramatic and traumatic contraction of the newspaper industry in the last decade suggests that the business models, publishing platforms and journalistic conventions that seemed so stable and certain a
  • Robots could do better than some journalists

    Newsosaur
    22 Jul 2014 | 3:17 pm
    When the Associated Press announced plans to use computers to write corporate earnings stories, a number of journalists asked me if I was as horrified by the prospect as they were.  In fact, I think robots could do better than some reporters. With all respect and affection for my fellow journalists, I have concluded that a well-programmed set of algorithms can be far more analytic and
  • The newspaper crisis, by the numbers

    Newsosaur
    16 Jul 2014 | 5:00 am
    Roughly a decade after the commercial debut of the Internet, America’s newspapers posted record high advertising sales of $49.4 billion in 2005, leading many publishers to think their businesses would not be seriously affected by the digital revolution. But they were wrong.   Since hitting that high note in 2005, the industry has undergone a dramatic and traumatic contraction, losing nearly
  • Newspapers can’t merely dabble at digital

    Newsosaur
    10 Jul 2014 | 5:00 am
    The New York Times wrote the story in 1853 about how Solomon Northup was kidnapped and sold into slavery, but Gawker got most of the page views by publicizing the archived article when “12 Years a Slave” won the Oscar for best picture in 2014.  This example of how the Times fails to capitalize on its rich content to build digital readership, relevance and revenues came to light in the leak
 
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    20 headlines from the reading list

  • The Power of You: Moment of Thought

    19 Aug 2014 | 12:45 pm
  • How Should Publishers Assign Value to Writers?

    19 Aug 2014 | 6:00 am
    Among all the highly complicated questions media companies are grappling with, Time Inc. is still in a seriously unique transitional period. But when Gawker reported that the publisher — more specifically, Sports Illustrated magazine — scores its editorial writers based on how much they benefit the respective magazine’s advertiser relationships, it was a bit hard for me to feel sorry for them. To be fair, that’s not the only thing they’re applying a numerical value to. “Quality of Writing,” “Impact of Stories/Newsworthiness,”…
  • SEO and Other Terms to Know for Digital Media Success

    18 Aug 2014 | 9:26 am
    As print publications continue to close shop or move content entirely to the Web, more and more writers and editors will need to adapt to the digital landscape. And with this new environment comes a new language every online journalist should know. At the top of the list is SEO or search engine optimization. No doubt you’ve heard of it. ”SEO… determines rankings in Google, Bing and Yahoo searches,” said Brande Victorian, deputy editor of MadameNoire.com. She added: It’s sort of this game of picking out keywords that are going to make the content that you write…
  • Last Call for Inquirer-Based Kickstarter Project, With Even Better Rewards

    18 Aug 2014 | 8:02 am
    Is it just me or does it feel like everything in the news this week is a little bit out of control? In the name of a lazy transition, that’s probably how Will Steacy felt as he started to photograph the newsroom of the Philadelphia Inquirer to document all the changes it, too, was undergoing. The result? You can see for yourself here. It’s not exactly a cheerful distraction, but it’s a gorgeous portrait of how our practice has changed over the years. There’s just over 24 hours left to donate to his Kickstarter and fund his tribute to journalism, evolving newsrooms, and…
  • Video: How to Adjust Controls for Touch

    18 Aug 2014 | 12:00 am
    People interact with touch-based user interfaces with their fingers. So user interface controls have to be big enough to capture fingertip actions without frustrating users with erroneous actions and tiny targets. In this quick 3 minute video I share how to adjust your UI controls for touch. This video is part of my User Experience How-To series sponsored by the Intel Developer Zone.
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    Poynter. » MediaWire

  • Today in media history: The dial telephone was 1896 cutting-edge technology

    David Shedden
    20 Aug 2014 | 4:00 am
    Here are four events that happened on this date and a trivia question. August 20, 1896 A patent is filed for one of the most important devices in the history of reporting: the dial telephone. The following clip from the 1940 journalism movie “His Girl Friday” reminds us how reporters used this cutting-edge technology. August 20, 1920 WWJ (8MK), one of the first commercial radio stations, goes on the air. The station was originally operated by The Detroit News. Newspapers around the country began buying or starting radio stations in the 1920s. August 20, 1926 A syndicated newspaper…
  • After new plagiarism allegations, Time magazine will review Zakaria’s work again

    Benjamin Mullin
    19 Aug 2014 | 1:46 pm
    Our Bad Media Time magazine will review Fareed Zakaria’s work after Twitter users @blippoblappo and @crushingbort accused the CNN journalist of lifting from a variety of publications, including Vanity Fair, Businessweek and the New Yorker. Time magazine “takes the accusations seriously,” according to a statement from Daniel Kile, vice president of communications for Time Inc.: In 2012, we conducted a review of Zakaria’s work for TIME and were satisfied with the results of that investigation. We will be reviewing these new allegations carefully. Zakaria is the host of…
  • Digital First puts 51 newspaper buildings on the market

    Andrew Beaujon
    19 Aug 2014 | 11:53 am
    Digital First Media has listed 51 newspaper buildings for sale, according to a press release from the real estate firm Twenty Lake Holdings. The properties are “for sale across seven states including California, Connecticut, Colorado and Pennsylvania, to name a few,” Twenty Lake Holdings says in its release. The planned sale “enables us to streamline our real estate portfolio through a comprehensive program encompassing property sales, new leasing, relocations and consolidation, thereby freeing the company from the constraints of being overburdened with underutilized…
  • 4 tips for adjusting to the tempo of digital news from veteran designer Mario Garcia

    Benjamin Mullin
    19 Aug 2014 | 10:56 am
    The key to telling stories in the digital age is remembering that the news cycle is propelled by two tempos that each require different strategies, veteran news designer Mario Garcia explained at TEDxPoynterInstitute Tuesday. The tempos, which Garcia calls “24/7″ and “curation,” are different from one another, but every news organization has to pay attention to both to fully serve its audience, Garcia said. He shared some tips, gleaned from four decades of design consulting with 700 news organizations, on how to manage the two storytelling modes. Here are some…
  • A note to journalists in Ferguson: ‘You are living up to your responsibilities’

    Kristen Hare
    19 Aug 2014 | 10:35 am
    Richard H. Weiss is a former reporter, editor and writing coach at the St. Louis Post-Dispatch, and one of the founders of the news nonprofit St. Louis Beacon, which recently merged with St. Louis Public Radio. He operates WeissWrite LLC, a writing, editing and coaching service for students, journalists and anyone with a story to tell. (He’s also a former co-worker of mine.) He posted the following note on Facebook on Monday night. We are reposting it with his permission. I was out of town the past week and not physically present for ‪#‎Ferguson‬. Watching from afar, I was so…
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    Media Disruptus

  • Future of news scenarios show what’s (likely) to happen with newspapers

    Steve Outing
    6 Aug 2014 | 2:50 pm
    What will happen to the newspaper industry in the next half decade? No One In the World can accurately predict one future for newspapers, or even for one specific newspaper. But we can reasonably determine what are the most likely, plausible 5-year-out futures. As part of my continuing series of demonstrating and applying Foresight methods...
  • Predict future news events with web data

    Steve Outing
    15 Jul 2014 | 2:56 pm
    Is it possible to know the future? In general, the answer is a resounding “No!” But in certain instances, tools are emerging to predict what might happen in the near future with high probability. This kind of knowledge — say, that civil unrest and violence is likely to erupt in a specific country within the...
  • Start at the end: How ‘backcasting’ might save investigative journalism

    Steve Outing
    9 Jul 2014 | 9:30 am
    Wouldn’t it be wonderful? If we could envision a desirable future and make it happen. Is that possible? … Well, sort of. I encourage the news/media industries and journalism educators to give it a try. This is the second of my series to demonstrate the many tools and methods of strategic foresight (a.k.a., futures studies),...
  • How to measure the value of news content: How about based on reader action?

    Steve Outing
    26 Jun 2014 | 3:58 pm
    “What is the best way to measure meaningful content?” … That’s the prompt for June’s Carnival of Journalism, a monthly blog-fest where journalism experts and aficionados answer a common question, and the result is a brain dump usually representing lots of diversity and wisdom. Carnival proprietor David Cohn has a rule for participants: “No apologies.”...
  • What if? … The NY Times ended its daily print edition

    Steve Outing
    3 Jun 2014 | 4:09 pm
    Stop the presses! (For 6 days a week!) … Yes, I’m being serious. The recent New York Times “Innovation” report, a meant-to-be-internal strategy document proposing a (long-overdue) digital-first future for what is arguably the best newspaper and digital news operation on the planet, painted a depressing picture. Despite beefing up its digital business and creating...
 
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    Evolving Newsroom

  • Bookmarks for August 14, 2014

    Julie Starr
    14 Aug 2014 | 2:56 pm
    The growing pay gap between journalism and public relations | Pew Research Center The salary gap between public relations specialists and news reporters has widened over the past decade – to almost $20,000 a year, according to 2013 U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics data analyzed by the Pew Research Center. All the myths that are fit to print: Why your news feels familiar | Jack Shafer Few readers would confess to myth-seeking in their media choices, yet Lule makes the undeniable case that audiences prefer news when it is fashioned into something more eternal than pure information.
  • Bookmarks for March 11, 2014

    Julie Starr
    11 Mar 2014 | 1:48 pm
    Feinstein: CIA searched Intelligence Committee computers – The Washington Post Head of the intelligence panel says agency appears to have violated the Constitution and federal laws. What People Say At Work Vs. What They Mean 99 office cliches, translated. Ninety-five per cent of world’s fish hide in mesopelagic zone An international team of marine biologists has found mesopelagic fish in the earth’s oceans constitute 10 to 30 times more biomass than previously thought. How much of the human body is made up of stardust? Did you ever wonder where you came from? That is the…
  • Responsive or native app? A few tips on how to decide

    Julie Starr
    4 Dec 2013 | 11:16 pm
    This list of 10 questions to ask when choosing between responsive design and native app looks sensible. Here are two questions from the list, posted by Mark Rickmeier on Table XI (they do tech services): 7) Will you have difficulty getting App Store approval? Apple asks developers to follow stringent guidelines when submitting to the App Store, and the approval process can take anywhere from a week to several months. There are certain areas that are regulated more strictly than others, such as in-app purchases and in-app subscriptions. Moreover, other kinds of features easily achieved…
  • How I read the internet

    Julie Starr
    4 Dec 2013 | 7:12 pm
    Apps come and go so fast I’ve forgotten how I used to ‘read’ the internet. So, for future reference, here’s How I Read the Internet – on my laptop – in December 2013.   Cross-posted on Medium.         The post How I read the internet appeared first on Evolving Newsroom.
  • Why you shouldn’t drink seawater (even if you’re shipwrecked)

    Julie Starr
    2 Dec 2013 | 6:00 pm
    Gideon Jacques Denny: Shipwrecked figures signaling to a distant sailing ship I feel like I’ve always ‘known’ that it’s bad to drink seawater but I can’t remember ever learning why. This excerpt from Rose George’s excellent ‘90% of Everything: Inside Shipping‘ gives a fair idea. In a lecture to the Royal College of Physicians in 1942, MacDonald Critchley, a physician who had studied survival at sea, said that “seawater poisoning must be accounted, after cold, the commonest cause of death in shipwrecked sailors.” At first, it…
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    LOCAL ONLINER

  • Empty Seats at Lunch? Mogl Launches Time of Day Promotions

    Peter
    18 Aug 2014 | 1:38 pm
    Loyalty programs offering cash back or other rewards make a lot of sense for merchants – until it is 7:30 pm on Friday, and the loyalty program is still giving 20 percent back even though it is prime time for the restaurant. Mogl, the San Diego-based loyalty firm now working with over 1,000 restaurants in Southern California, San Francisco and Phoenix, thinks it has solved the problem. Since June, the company — which has raised $25 million and set to initiate a new round — has been rolling out a new version that lets restaurants choose the amount of cash-back based on time of…
  • Gannett’s Deal for Cars.com

    Peter
    6 Aug 2014 | 5:22 pm
    In a move that shows a deep commitment to the future of classified/vertical advertising, Gannett has announced it will buy out its newspaper partners in Cars.com and take sole possession of the #2 car site (which trails only Cox’s AutoTrader in the online auto marketplace.) It will pay heartily to do so, paying $1.8 billion for the 73% stake of Cars.com that it doesn’t already own. That sets a value for Cars.com of $2.5 billion — an impressive amount, but still $500 million less than what the highest estimates called for. An “economic event” around Cars.com and its sister…
  • First Data Bets on Virtual Gift Cards to Drive Local Commerce

    Peter
    30 Jul 2014 | 10:18 am
    Gift cards have been growing astronomically and now make up an industry nearing $100 billion in revenues. You’ll see racks of cards for national brands and retailers everywhere, from Safeway to Bed, Bath & Beyond. But can local merchants get in the loop? We’ve seen gift card activity increase in travel, spa & salon and hospitality. Most of these are sold in person or on web sites. And a second question: can they go virtual, with gift cards stored in e-wallets and easily bought, sold and transacted via mobile phone? While the industry is relatively nascent, Mercator Advisory…
  • Coming to New Orleans? More Top Speakers Announced for SMB Digital Marketing, Sept. 22-24

    Peter
    29 Jul 2014 | 5:16 pm
    We keep adding and adding to the lineup for our SMB Digital Marketing event, which takes place Sept. 22-24 in Rockin’ New Orleans (yes, we are trying to top last year’s super event in Austin). We’re boasting 32 industry leaders for the event now, and expect to end at 40+. Among our new adds are: • Julien Billot, CEO, YPG • James Croom, General Manager, Google My Business, Google • Peter Curzon, Business Development, Yelp • Tim Williamson, CEO, The Idea Village • Neal Polachek, Board Advisor, Buzzboard • Matt Graves, CDO, Infogroup • Faith Murphy, Director, Channel…
  • Zillow to Buy Trulia; Will Pursue Twin Brand Strategy

    Peter
    28 Jul 2014 | 1:18 pm
    Zillow is buying Trulia, its chief rival, for $3.5 Billion in stock. The two companies – both nine years old — have a lot of overlap currently. But after the deal closes in 2015, they will seek to develop two differentiated marketplaces for real estate-related information, which includes house sales, rentals, mortgage and related national and local advertising. As the acquiring company, Zillow would focus on “top of funnel” awareness advertising. Trulia, meanwhile, would focus more on specific agent-related, final purchase (or rental)- related advertising. According to…
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    VideoJournalism

  • Bite me…

    Cyndy Green
    1 Aug 2014 | 11:35 am
    So being the expert VJ and teacher, I never thought my words would come back to bite me. As in, “the only way to get good is to practice, practice, practice.” It has been a lifelong goal of mine to someday learn how to strum a guitar without scaring the livestock. My husband of many years has made that possible with a gift card – and I’m into month two of weekly lessons. It’s wonderful! I get the theory, love listening to the instructor (henceforth and in reality called Tommy) explain and expound and strum his guitar. It looks oh so very easy to do. The truth is…
  • Crushing dreams for being realistic?

    Cyndy Green
    26 Jun 2014 | 8:26 am
    We all have dreams. A better life. Being thinner, richer. Sometimes material things. Sometimes something else. Hopefully though we all have a way to balance our dreams with the real world and not spend life wallowing in regrets. When I look back at my life I see that many of my dreams never materialized through either my own poor judgement or circumstances, but I don’t let it bother me. Much more than a twinge…and then I move on. I’ve been lucky enough to have two careers that totally absorbed me. Three girls who have grown into women I could never have imagined…like…
  • It’s called death watch…

    Cyndy Green
    12 Apr 2014 | 3:08 am
    …the stories you go on “just in case”… Routine almost to the point of boring.   Hop on over to Amanda Emily’s The Dope Sheet and check it out. Addendum April 13, 2014. Just noticed how many folks are clicking through on the link above and think I’d better explain a bit. A lot of times news crews are given routine assignments that may or may not end with something on air/published. The intent is more to be present just in case something happens. There are crews routinely assigned to follow and travel with the President and other world dignitaries. Some…
  • How do I choose a camera?

    Cyndy Green
    17 Mar 2014 | 9:41 am
    Panasonic AG-HMC150 and Samsung NX-1000 Dangerous ground…especially if you don’t know enough to know what you should be looking for. This blog posting is for those who want to stretch their knowledge and move beyond simple P&S (point and shoot) folks who just use their cameras to take family photos or video or LAMIGABEC! (Look at me – I’ve got a big expensive camera!) types who are all about impressing folks. This blog posting is for those of you who just know somehow you’re missing out on the real secrets of shooting and editing video…what makes the…
  • Victim or perpetrator?

    Cyndy Green
    3 Mar 2014 | 9:54 pm
    I follow Carlos Miller’s Photography Is Not a Crime blog for a reason. Ninety-nine percent of the time photographers are harassed due to either ignorance about First Amendment rights by law enforcement and other agencies or at times those agencies or employees deliberately ignoring the rights of media and citizens. First – the media has no more nor less rights than any citizen of this great country. So if a videojournalist is pushed back and locals are allowed to stay near a homicide scene that is wrong – illegal. Journalists can, however, be allowed closer and are even…
 
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    News

  • Photojournalist James Foley Executed By ISIS On Video

    2094
    19 Aug 2014 | 3:03 pm
    A video posted online today by The Islamic State in Iraq and Syria (ISIS) shows a militant in the act of beheading American freelance photojournalist James W. Foley.
  • NPPA Protests Ferguson Police Tactics, Disrespect For Constitutional Rights

    2094
    14 Aug 2014 | 9:30 am
    Today the National Press Photographers Association sent a strong letter of protest to the Ferguson, MO, chief of police regarding the unwarranted arrest and detention of journalists who are coving the town's unfolding national story, as well as the department's "complete lack of understanding an respect for the First Amendment."
  • Italian AP Video Journalist Simone Camilli Killed In Gaza Blast

    2094
    13 Aug 2014 | 6:09 am
    An Associated Press video journalist and a freelance Palestinian translator assisting him were killed in an ordnance explosion Wednesday while working on an assignment about the aftermath about the recent war in the Gaza Strip.
  • NPPA's Words On Pictures: Kim Komenich

    2094
    11 Aug 2014 | 6:20 am
    In this episode of Words On Pictures, the National Press Photographers Association's new audio podcast, photojournalist Kim Komenich shares his thoughts on his early photographic influences that helped shape his vision as a young shooter growing up in Manteca, CA.
  • NPPA Board Meeting Opens In Florida

    2094
    8 Aug 2014 | 5:38 am
    A one-day meeting of the board of directors of the National Press Photographers Association kicked off this morning, the first event in this weekend's "Best Of Photojournalism Awards Show & Education Festival."
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    Online Journalism Blog

  • FAQ: Do you need new ethics for computational journalism?

    Paul Bradshaw
    16 Aug 2014 | 12:55 am
    This latest post in the FAQ series answers questions posed by a student in Belgium regarding ethics and data journalism. Q: Do ethical issues in the practice of computational journalism differ from those of “traditional” journalism? No, I don’t think they do particularly – any more than ethics in journalism differ from ethics in life in general. However, as in journalism versus life, there are areas which attract more attention because they are the places we find the most conflict between different ethical demands. For example, the tension between public interest and an…
  • Verifying video and other information – crowdsourcing site Bellingcat now open

    Paul Bradshaw
    13 Aug 2014 | 6:08 am
    The crowdsourcing site Bellingcat – whose posts were previously only visible to donors – is now completely open. The site, launched by conflict blogger Eliot Higgins (better known as Brown Moses), has successfully raised almost £50,000 through Kickstarter while performing a significant role in verifying information about crashed flight MH17. But alongside its news and resources (including case studies) the site also includes a section of ‘How-To’s which are particularly useful for any journalist dealing with information online. These currently include: A…
  • Transfer rumours, robot journalism and The Guardian: when it makes sense to put a poll BEFORE the article

    Paul Bradshaw
    7 Aug 2014 | 5:33 am
    Nice work by The Guardian (above) in their online reporting on transfer rumours: readers of each report are presented with a vote on whether they think the rumour is likely to be true before they get to read the full article. It’s a good example of putting interactivity – and distribution – front and centre when the headline has already done most of the editorial work. It’s also a good example of making the most of editorial content which is inherently social: transfer rumours are the sort of conversational fodder people buy newspapers for. Not only does this…
  • So Google scans email for dodgy images – should we be worried about scanning for sensitive documents?

    Paul Bradshaw
    6 Aug 2014 | 11:41 am
    You could be forgiven for not having heard of John Henry Skillern. The 41 year old is facing charges of possession and promotion of child pornography after Google detected images of child abuse on his Gmail account. Because of his case we now know that Google “proactively scours hundreds of millions of email accounts” for certain images. The technology has raised some privacy concerns which have been largely brushed aside because, well, it’s child pornography. Sky’s technology correspondent Tom Cheshire, for example, doesn’t think it is an invasion of…
  • Hyperlocal Voices: Matthew Duffy, Coventry Culture

    Damian Radcliffe
    18 Jul 2014 | 4:20 am
    Not all hyperlocal sites cover everything that’s happening in the patch, some focus on specific subject areas. The latest in our series of Hyperlocal Voices sees Damian Radcliffe look at Coventry Culture. As the site celebrates its first anniversary this month, founder and editor Matthew Duffy tells him about his journey over the past 12 months. 1.  Who were the people behind the blog? The blog is run entirely by myself. 2.  What made you decide to set up the blog? I began Coventry Culture first and for-most as a third year final project for my Journalism degree course. To expand…
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    Common Sense Journalism

  • RIP: Dan Lynch

    Doug Fisher
    19 Aug 2014 | 6:13 am
    Sad news from Fort Wayne that former Journal Gazette editorial cartoonist Dan Lynch has died.Dan was on staff when I got there and was genuinely a fun guy to work with. He trundled off to Kansas City for a stint and Steve Sack, now in Minneapolis, took his spot for a bit.But Dan returned to the Fort Wayne fold, poking fun at the city and its pols (which is kind of like shooting fish in a barrel), until a stroke sidelined him in 2001. I always liked his clean and to the point style.  I hope I still have in my files a couple of Dan's drawings that he graciously shared. Dan and his work…
  • Gannett's Asheville editor is frank about the changes

    Doug Fisher
    7 Aug 2014 | 11:34 am
    With all the turmoil at Gannett this week, Columbia Journalism Review's Corey Hutchins has landed a rather frank interview with Joshua Awtry, editor overseeing the Asheville Citizen-Times in North Carolina and The Greenville News in South Carolina.Among some of Awtry's lines:"I will not hire a digital producer who doesn’t have a strong grasp of editing.""The Carolinas will have a full-time beer reporter. Right now, both Asheville and Greenville have beer reporters in different fashions. Asheville has a reporter who does a lot of beer coverage but has to pick up other things too. In…
  • It's almost always 'rebut,' not 'refute'

    Doug Fisher
    2 Aug 2014 | 5:00 am
    The State newspaper in Columbia has suddenly, in recent months, seemed to get tangled up about "rebut" versus "refute." Maybe they don't go over this at the editing hub up north or whatever.Tonight's entry:Unless you're taking the PGA's side in this, the word is "rebuts" -- or, even better, "denies," which is the word used in the story's lede."Refutes" implies that you've taken sides and decided that one party has essentially proved its argument.It's not an inconsequential nuance, especially in headline type, for professional writers and editors who are supposed to know better.
  • More SC FOIA follies from the AP's Jeffrey Collins

    Doug Fisher
    29 Jul 2014 | 10:07 am
    The AP's Jeffrey Collins provides this image on Facebook today of a North Augusta police report:Here is his explanation:I'm not a big fan of calling myself words like watchdog. But I do like to verify information governments want to give out. Sometimes it's not the whole story. Sometimes, it isn't true. I wanted to talk to the woman who called police on the 9-year-old girl at the park in North Augusta. Maybe she regrets the decision now. Maybe she saw something really dangerous that is not in the police report. But the Solicitor's Office blacked out all the identifying information about her.
  • How not to do customer service in 2014, newspaper version

    Doug Fisher
    28 Jul 2014 | 8:35 pm
    So here's a wager for you (I'll provide a copy of AP's newswriting guide by Jack Cappon to the first person who can figure out the puzzle).One condition: You must be a seven-day print and digital subscriber to The State newspaper.The setup: Go to the newspaper's website. Pretend you want to look at various pricing to see if, as a consumer, there are options to consider. Try to find where it lists your subscription options other than your existing seven-day-plus-digital subscription.That's OK, I'll wait.Try the FAQs. See anything there (of course, that they haven't been updated since November…
 
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    CyberJournalist.net

  • kenyatta: How news of #Ferguson spread across...

    15 Aug 2014 | 2:18 pm
    kenyatta: How news of #Ferguson spread across Twitter  Geotagged Tweets mentioning “Ferguson” and key terms, CDT You absolutely must click through to see the whole thing if only b/c I couldn’t make a gif that included the entire world map. h/t @kthread How news of Ferguson spread across Twitter…
  • "Please buy a newspaper tomorrow, or else I’m just out there eating tear gas for Twitter."

    13 Aug 2014 | 7:28 pm
    “Please buy a newspaper tomorrow, or else I’m just out there eating tear gas for Twitter.” - mattdpearce​, Los Angeles Times
  • "No matter what anybody tells you, words and ideas can change the world."

    12 Aug 2014 | 7:06 am
    “No matter what anybody tells you, words and ideas can change the world.” - Robin Williams as John Keating in “Dead Poets Society” (via usatoday)
  • Did you know Tumblr refers more average video starts than...

    12 Aug 2014 | 5:42 am
    Did you know Tumblr refers more average video starts than YouTube, Twitter and Reddit? This is according to Adobe’s Q4 2013 Video Benchmark report, which also says Tumblr is producing nearly identical video view rates as Facebook, with over 1/3rd of referred visits producing a video start. Another interesting tidbit: 56% of visits referred from Tumblr to sports-related websites resulted in a video view. (via reelseo.com)
  • "The paradox of social media is that it offers a channel through which to communicate yourself while..."

    11 Aug 2014 | 11:25 am
    ““The paradox of social media is that it offers a channel through which to communicate yourself while the technology itself shapes and limits what is communicated, and how. All these people, each of them tweeting a tiny Whitmanesque song of himself, are largely indistinguishable.”” - Mark O’Connell on Cory Arcangel’s new book, “Working on My Novel,” and why novelists tweet about their writing: http://nyr.kr/1sF4avK (via newyorker)
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    The Newspaper Guild

  • NY Guiild, Allies Rally for El Diario Workers Outside CIty Hall

    Janelle
    19 Aug 2014 | 3:21 pm
    StaffAugust 19, 2014The Newspaper Guild of New YorkEl Diario workers and leaders of the New York Guild were joined by supporters from the NYC Central Labor Council, Labor Council for Latin American Advancement, the Newspaper Deliverers Union and other allies Tuesday to demand an end to the illegal firings and threats against union-represented workers at the media company. Speakers called for the reinstatement of eight workers illegally fired in June. Following the press conference, those workers and their Guild representatives had several positive and productive meetings with elected…
  • Reporter with Most Apple Scoops is 20-Year-Old Student

    Janelle
    19 Aug 2014 | 1:35 pm
    Michael RosenwaldAugust 19, 2014Columbia Journalism ReviewThe best-sourced reporter covering Apple Inc., one of the world’s most secretive companies, is a 20-year-old junior at the University of Michigan. His name is Mark Gurman. He makes more than six figures a year as senior editor and scoop master at 9to5Mac.com, a news outlet most people have never heard of. Gurman’s scoops, beginning in high school, have included stories about Apple’s foray into tablets, new phone designs, the arrival of Siri, the dropping of Google maps, how Apple stores operate, how new operating systems work and…
  • Afghan Officials Won't Let NY Times Reporter Leave Country

    Janelle
    19 Aug 2014 | 11:42 am
    Rod NordlandAugust 19, 2014The New York TimesThe Afghan attorney general’s office called in a New York Times correspondent for questioning Tuesday, and later banned him from leaving the country, after The Times published a story about discussions among some officials of imposing an interim government. The correspondent, Matthew Rosenberg, 40, a three-year veteran of The Times’s Kabul bureau, was summoned to the attorney general’s office for what was billed as an “informal chat” Tuesday about an article published in that day’s newspaper. The article said that powerful figures in…
  • Newspaper Vet Praises, Cautions Journalists in Ferguson

    Janelle
    19 Aug 2014 | 11:10 am
    StaffAugust 19, 2014PoynterRichard Weiss, retired St. Louis Post-Dispatch reporter, editor and writing coach, is praising journalists covering Ferguson for "living up to your responsibilities. Beautifully." And he suggests those doing it best are staying out of the story. "This is not the time to let people know how many hours you are working (which is a way of bragging that you are tireless) or that you are scared (which is a way of saying you are really brave) or that you are appearing in 15 minutes on BBC or CNN (which is a way of saying you are special) or that your news site got 10…
  • No Textbook Teaches What Journalists are Learning at Riots

    Janelle
    19 Aug 2014 | 7:51 am
    Paul FarhiAugust 19, 2014The Washington PostThe first thing you learn in covering a riot is to expect the unexpected. It’s not just the rioters you have to worry about, say reporters; the authorities can be difficult — and dangerous — too. Journalists who’ve been covering the ongoing unrest in Ferguson, Mo., for the past week describe being wary of both sides. If they aren’t being threatened by looters, they could be in the path of tear-gas showers and rubber-bullet volleys launched by police. Many journalists have been gassed, and a few have been hurt, although none seriously it…
 
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    OUPblog » Media

  • Publishing tips from a journal editor: selecting the right journal

    MAlvarez
    17 Aug 2014 | 3:30 am
    One of the most common questions that scholars confront is trying to find the right journal for their research papers. When I go to conferences, often I am asked: “How do I know if Political Analysis is the right journal for my work?” This is an important question, in particular for junior scholars who don’t have a lot of publishing experience — and for scholars who are nearing important milestones (like contract renewal, tenure, and promotion). In a publishing world where it may take months for an author to receive an initial decision from a journal, and then many…
  • Technologies of sexiness

    Elizabeth Gorney
    10 Aug 2014 | 3:30 am
    What does it mean for a woman to “feel sexy”? In our current consumer culture, the idea of achieving sexiness is all-pervasive: an expectation of contemporary femininity, wrapped up in objects ranging from underwear, shoes, sex toys, and erotic novels. Particular celebrities and “sex symbol” icons, ranging throughout the decades, are said to embody it: Marilyn Monroe, Brigitte Bardot, Farrah Fawcett, Madonna, Sharon Stone, Pamela Anderson, Kim Kardashian, Miley Cyrus, Megan Fox. Ways of achieving sexiness are suggested by new sex experts, confidence and self-esteem…
  • My client’s online presence

    Elizabeth Gorney
    9 Aug 2014 | 5:30 am
    Social media and other technologies have changed how we communicate. Consider how we coordinate events and contact our friends and family members today, versus how we did it 20 or 30 years ago. Today, we often text, email, or communicate through social media more frequently than we phone or get together in person. Now contrast that with psychotherapy, which is still about two people getting together in a room and talking. Certainly, technology has changed psychotherapy. There are now apps for mental health issues. There are virtual reality treatments. Psychotherapy can now be provided through…
  • Youth and the new media: what next?

    Elizabeth Gorney
    8 Aug 2014 | 4:30 am
    Now that the Internet has been with us for over 25 years, what are we to make of all the concerns about how this new medium is affecting us, especially the young digital natives who know more about how to maneuver in this space than most adults? Although it is true that various novel media platforms have invaded households in the United States, many researchers still focus on the harms that the “old” media of television and movies still have on youth. The effects of advertising on promoting the obesity epidemic highlight how so much of those messages are directed to children and…
  • A decade of change: producing books in a digital world

    Julia Callaway
    4 Aug 2014 | 3:30 am
    It may be hard for some of us here at Oxford University Press to imagine a life without Oxford Scholarship Online (OSO), but even though it has reached the grand old age of 10 years old, it is still only a baby in comparison with some of our other venerable institutions. For example, the Oxford English Dictionary first published in 1884, 130 years ago, and the Oxford Almanack 340 years ago in 1674; even our celebrated duck pond is almost 200 years old. OUP employees in our Great Clarendon Street building are used to bumping into history in the most unexpected corners; my most recent find has…
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    Blogposts | The Guardian

  • Outrage over Isis beheading of US journalist James Foley live updates

    Matthew Weaver and Haroon Siddique
    20 Aug 2014 | 4:53 am
    Foleys killer had a British accentCameron says Foleys murder is shocking and depravedIsis threatens to kill another captured journalistFoleys mother: He was an extraordinary sonRead the latest summary 12.53pm BST The US military has been posting daily updates on its air strikes over Iraq. Its most recent update confirmed two more air strikes near the Mosul dam on Tuesday.It was posted before news spread that Isis had threatened to kill another journalist if US air strikes continued. 12.37pm BST You can listen to the London accent of Foleys killer on this audio clip. 12.32pm BST A linguistics…
  • Bank of England split 7-2 over interest rates - business live

    Graeme Wearden
    20 Aug 2014 | 4:51 am
    Monetary Policy Committees unanimity crumbles with two policymakers voting to raise interest rates to 0.75%, but first hike may still not come this yearBoE split 7-2 on rates <- new readers start hereMcCafferty and Weale: start raising rates nowRest of the MPC: wages need to rise firstWhat the experts say - reaction starts here 12.51pm BST Jonathan Pryor, head of FX Dealing at Investec Corporate and Institutional Treasury, says the 7-2 split is a surprise, given how dovish the Banks Inflation Report was last week.This vote is likely to leave UK businesses scratching their heads about the…
  • Offensive Greggs logo debacle: what are the lessons for other retailers?

    Phillip Smith
    20 Aug 2014 | 4:42 am
    Greggs proactive and humorous response to its logo mishap is a lesson in crisis management all retailers should followIt has already been an interesting week in the office for bakery giant Greggs. If you searched for the company via Google on Tuesday, instead of the brands official logo and slogan (Always fresh. Always tasty) an alternative image popped up, with the offensive strapline: Providing shit to scum for over 70 years.While the cause seems to be a case of crossed wires with Googles search algorithm, the companys response on social media helped to defuse the issue and painted it as a…
  • Glencore report: European Investment Bank must drag its secrets into the light | Rachel Baird

    Rachel Baird
    20 Aug 2014 | 4:40 am
    Reasons given by the bank for refusing to publish findings of an investigation into alleged tax evasion remain unconvincingWhen commodities giant Glencore publishes its half-yearly report on Wednesday, it is unlikely to mention what may be a significant victory for the firm.This relates to an investigation into allegations of tax evasion by a mining firm in Zambia controlled by Glencore allegations the companies have always denied. Continue reading...
  • Pierce Brosnan is rubbish at GoldenEye 007, and the rest of the day's pop culture LIVE

    Gwilym Mumford (10-1.30) Lanre Bakare (onwards, ever onwards)
    20 Aug 2014 | 4:37 am
    Good grief and pain, its the Guide DailyProviding you with the best tunes, trailers and tother stuffTodays juicy morsels: Brosnans video game woes, THAT Nicki Minaj video and the new Educating... series.Communicate: @guideguardian 12.37pm BST Heres the trailer for the Educating The East End, the latest instalment in Channel 4s award-winning format, which will no doubt have us all laughing/sobbing in unison throughout the autumn. So far, Ive spotted the inspirational, firm-but-fair head-teacher (Weve all had haircuts that have been haircuts from hell), the slightly cringe-inducing maverick…
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    blog maverick

  • The 6 Things You Need to Know to be Great in Business

    CyberDust ID - Blogmaverick
    16 Aug 2014 | 11:22 pm
    There are no shortcuts in business.  In order to be successful there are some things that you must know.  These are not all of them by a long shot, but IMHO they are 6 of the most important   1. Know how to sell. Selling means being able to convey why your product or service, which may be you if you are looking for a job,  will make things better. Selling is never about convincing. It is always about helping. 2. Put yourself in the shoes of your customer If you know how to put the person you are dealing with in a position to succeed, you can be successful. In order to do this, you…
  • AEREO – Everything Old is New Again

    CyberDust ID - Blogmaverick
    19 Jul 2014 | 4:30 pm
    AEREO deserves a lot of credit for their effort.  It was a long and expensive shot to do what they went for.  But they went for it.  And they attempted to pivot after their SCOTUS loss. I was watching with interest, because it is something we had examined 15 years ago at Broadcast.com The technology has obviously gotten better on all sides of the equation, but sometimes a good idea is a good idea. Even if it is hard to make work.  This is from January of 2000. What is fascinating is the alliances and attempts that were being made or considered.   We also did the same kind of work to…
  • The Idiots Guide to High Frequency Trading

    CyberDust ID - Blogmaverick
    3 Apr 2014 | 1:28 pm
    First, let me say what you read here is going to be wrong in several ways.  HFT covers such a wide path of trading that different parties participate or are impacted in different ways. I wanted to put this out there as a starting point . Hopefully the comments will help further educate us all 1.  Electronic trading is part of HFT, but not all electronic trading is high frequency trading. Trading equities and other financial instruments has been around for a long time.  it is Electronic Trading that has lead to far smaller spreads and lower actual trading costs from your broker.  Very…
  • High Frequency Trading, and Proof that the SEC Approach to Insider Trading is Completely Wrong

    CyberDust ID - Blogmaverick
    2 Apr 2014 | 7:05 am
    Got to love Mary Jo White, the Chairwoman of the SEC.  While Michael Lewis’s book Flash Boys was getting all the headlines and was the topic of some of the best television  on CNBC, ever, Ms White used the firestorm to ask for more money for the SEC. Shocking ? The only shock would be if she didn’t use any occasion the SEC was in the public eye to ask for more money. It is unfortunate because there is no greater waste of money than what the SEC spends trying to enforce  insider trading laws. Let me give you some examples of just how poorly the SEC manages our tax dollars when…
  • The Back to the Future Arbitrage of Silicon Valley and what it will take to beat it

    CyberDust ID - Blogmaverick
    19 Mar 2014 | 10:05 am
    I’m not a huge fan of Silicon Valley. It reminds me so much of Hollywood and the movie and TV industry. In Hollywood every one will talk and listen to you about your project.  But while they are standing there, right in front of you, they are not looking at you. They are looking past you to the next project where they can raise/sell more.  Where they can be a bigger star. There is always a bigger fish. Who ever is standing in front of them is hopefully just the bait. Silicon Valley has become the exact same thing these days. No one wants to literally start from scratch in a garage and…
 
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    News from Journalism.co.uk

  • 'Data+Design' ebook launches to make data visualisation more accessible

    20 Aug 2014 | 3:27 am
    Over 50 volunteers worked on a free ebook to explain visualising and working with data to those with no specialised training
  • Filling the gaps: Crowdfunded reporting in Ferguson, Missouri

    19 Aug 2014 | 7:17 am
    A groundswell of support for independent reporting from protests over the killing of unarmed teenager Michael Brown by police has led Beacon Reader to directly connect journalists and readers in the area
  • #Tip: How to use BuzzSumo to monitor social analytics

    Catalina Albeanu
    18 Aug 2014 | 7:41 am
    Screengrab from BuzzSumo.com Knowing which stories get the most attention from social media is a big step in finding out what type of content audiences want from a certain media outlet. Sarah Marshall, social media editor EMEA at the Wall Street Journal, recently wrote about five ways she uses BuzzSumo, a free analytics tool for social. Although BuzzSumo was not created specifically for journalists, it allows users to see who’s engaging with a particular article, who the influencers in a chosen field are, and much more. The set of tools it brings to the table will, as Marshall wrote,…
  • Why constructive journalism can help engage the audience

    18 Aug 2014 | 3:00 am
    Studies show that stories which explore solutions to problems rather than just the problems themselves prompt audiences to engage with the news and share content
  • How Deca is taking a collaborative approach to longform

    18 Aug 2014 | 2:09 am
    An international co-operative of award-winning journalists are working together to tell the stories they feel are most important, despite most having never met in person
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    One Man and His Blog

  • Morning Coffee Reading, from the 24 hour social-media, digital-first world…

    Adam Tinworth
    18 Aug 2014 | 1:46 am
    Five recent reads you might have missed, and are well-worth your time: It's a 24/7 social media world out there Friends of the blog Brilliant Noise have done some research into the difference between "always on" Twitter presence and more sporadic approaches: Always-on is a more strategic and customer-focused approach: it acknowledges that the relationship with customers is always in development and that there should always be avenues open for conversation. In comparison, a campaign-based approach is more tactical, and more geared to short-term business priorities (e.g. boost sales now!) than…
  • When to drink coffee

    Adam Tinworth
    15 Aug 2014 | 2:12 pm
    Fast Company has the answer: This means the optimal times for consuming caffeine fall somewhere around 9:30 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. and 1:30 p.m. to 5:30 p.m. It's all in the cortisol levels, apparently…
  • When advertising goes native

    Adam Tinworth
    14 Aug 2014 | 3:17 pm
    So, this happened while I was away: Yes, we need new sources of income in digital. But I'm deeply unconvinced that "native" advertising is the future. We're essentially running a huge experiment to see if the old view - that compromising editorial values with paid content would erode the trust of the reader, and eventually destroy the relationship the advertising was paying to access - was accurate. The problem for the companies doing this is that, if the old view is correct and they've just destroyed a relationship, it's almost impossible to get back from there.
  • Amazon versus Captain America

    Adam Tinworth
    14 Aug 2014 | 2:48 am
    re/code on Amazon's rapidly escalating war with media owners: Retail giant Amazon is giving Captain America, Miss Piggy and Maleficent the cold shoulder. Consumers are suddenly unable to place advance orders to buy DVDs or Blu-ray discs of forthcoming films from Walt Disney Studios, including two popular summer releases that each captured more than $700 million in global box office receipts — “Captain America: The Winter Soldier” and “Maleficent.” Hail Hydra.
  • Reporting suicides without triggering them

    Adam Tinworth
    13 Aug 2014 | 3:20 am
    Many UK newspapers are botching their converge of the death of Robin Williams, by breaking reporting guidelines on suicides: The reason the media isn't supposed to talk about methods used is because that knowledge can turn someone who is passively suicidal into someone with an active plan. Knowing the distances dropped, the ligatures used, the medication taken, the blades employed, all of these things can give a suicidal person the knowledge of how to actually do the deed, how to go about taking their thoughts from the realm of the hypothetical into the realm of the real. This isn't…
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    The American Prospect

  • I'm Polite, Middle-Class and Harassed By Police. Here's Why.

    Andrea Cambron
    19 Aug 2014 | 11:55 am
    (AP Photo/The Progress-Index, Patrick Kane) I was eighteen, but I remember it like it was yesterday. It was dark, and I was driving with my sister when I got pulled over by the police. We were visiting relatives in Mississippi and had just left our cousins’ house, heading back to an aunt’s house to meet up with our parents. My mother had let us go out for a drive in her car, a red Eddie Bauer Edition Ford Explorer. Driving in that car, I felt a certain level of freedom and prestige. So, being the teenagers that we were, music blasting, rehashing the night’s events with each other, my…
  • The Ferguson Police Department's Top 10 Tips For Protester Relations

    Paul Waldman
    19 Aug 2014 | 9:31 am
    (AP Photo/Charlie Riedel) 1. If there's any chance that there might be violence, it's best to have your officers put on all the military gear they've got, including their body armor and camouflage outfits, because that's totally badass. Being decked out like that won't at all affect the way they think about their primary mission (to protect and serve the people of the community), and when protesters see it, they'll know that the officers are trained professionals who take their jobs seriously. 2. Park your armored personnel carriers in the middle of the street. That sight will let everyone…
  • No Jobs But Crappy Jobs: The Next Big Political Issue?

    Robert Kuttner
    18 Aug 2014 | 9:17 pm
    (AP Photo/The Brownsville Herald, Brad Doherty) Wal-Mart employee Nidia Flores arranges shirts, Thursday, August 7, 2014, in Brownsville, Texas. For decades, the increasing precariousness of work has been a source of mass frustration for tens of millions of Americans. But the issue has been largely below the political radar. Politicians ritually invoke good jobs at good wages, yet presidents have been unwilling to name, much less remedy, the deep economic forces that are turning payroll jobs into what I've termed "The Task Rabbit Economy"—a collection of ad hoc gigs with no benefits, no…
  • 'Leave It to the States': Admirable Moderation, Or Cowardly Cop-out?

    Paul Waldman
    18 Aug 2014 | 1:18 pm
    As everyone knows, opinions on same-sex marriage have been changing rapidly, which also means that the positions of politicians have to change to keep up. Now that pretty much every Democrat running for anything is in favor of marriage equality, they're done changing. Republicans, on the other hand, are going to have to keep tweaking their stance, confronted by the almost impossible challenging of signaling their open-mindedness to general election voters while not alienating a conservative base that, for a while anyway, is still opposed to gay people getting married. So what's the answer to…
  • What Judges Know: The Fault for Underfunded Pensions Lies With Politicians, Not Workers

    Jordan Marks
    18 Aug 2014 | 7:19 am
    (AP Photo/Mel Evans) Union members carry protest signs as they march outside the Mercer County Criminal Courthouse before arguments Wednesday, June 25, 2014, in Trenton, N.J., over New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie's plan to use pension payments to balance the budget. Public employee unions on Wednesday tell the court the current budget has unspent funds that could go toward pensions.  Advocates of gutting public pensions are running into the same wall over and over again. From California to Illinois to New Jersey and beyond, pension gutting efforts are being overturned by judges who recognize…
 
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    Nieman Lab

  • Scorecard for Sports Illustrated writers awards points for being “beneficial to advertiser relationship”

    Caroline O'Donovan
    18 Aug 2014 | 9:52 am
    Gawker reports today that at least one Time Inc. property internally ranks — and fires — its editorial employees using a rather unethical calculation. Based on a spreadsheet made available to the Newspaper Guild, it would seem that Sports Illustrated has calculated the worth of staffers based on categories including “Quality of Writing”; “Impact of Stories/Newsworthiness”; “Productivity/Tenacity”; “Audience/Traffic”; “Video”; “Social”; “Enthusiasm/Approach to Work”; and “Produces content that…
  • This Week in Review: Ferguson and press freedom, and BuzzFeed’s $50 million boost

    Mark Coddington
    15 Aug 2014 | 7:38 am
    This week’s essential reads: This week’s most important pieces are Zeynep Tufekci on Ferguson and algorithmic filtering, Felix Salmon on BuzzFeed, and Ethan Zuckerman on the failings of the ad-based business model on which the Internet runs. Press freedom and citizen journalism in Ferguson: The ongoing tensions in Ferguson, Missouri this week that followed a police officer’s killing of an unarmed black teenager became a major story about the media as well. Two reporters were arrested without any apparent justification Wednesday night, and numerous others were tear-gassed or…
  • Racist content forces Thought Catalog to put barriers between contributors and Twitter

    Caroline O'Donovan
    14 Aug 2014 | 10:50 am
    There’s no need to enumerate the breadth and variety of godawful content published by millennial angst engine Thought Catalog. The site’s propensity for publishing garbage is so well known, they actually address it in the FAQs. But today, the site published and tweeted a short article so egregiously racist, it could not be ignored. Ferguson, Missouri Looks Like A Rap Video http://t.co/RZgCqc90AD pic.twitter.com/GERC66l8LX — Thought Catalog (@ThoughtCatalog) August 14, 2014 The Internet responded emphatically. From the comments: “This ‘article’ is absolutely…
  • Ferguson and the power of a free Internet

    Caroline O'Donovan
    14 Aug 2014 | 10:04 am
    In a piece posted to The Message collection on Medium today, University of North Carolina professor Zeynep Tufekci reveals how issues of net neutrality are altering the news coming out of Ferguson, Mo. First, Tufekci compares how the story is unfolding on different platforms. While Twitter catapulted Ferguson into the national media, she says, Facebook’s algorithms obscured what was happening in Missouri early on. She goes on to illustrate how algorithms on social sites control the way a news story is brought to our attention. This isn’t about Facebook per se—maybe it will do a good…
  • The TV network/affiliate relationship is ripe for change

    Joshua Benton
    14 Aug 2014 | 8:33 am
    At Poynter, Al Tompkins notes an interesting development in the TV world: CBS fired an opening salvo in what could become a disruption for network affiliated television stations. WISH TV, the LIN Broadcasting owned station in Indianapolis will no longer be the CBS affiliate starting January 1, 2015. CBS is moving from LIN owned WISH-TV to the Tribune owned station WTTV, currently the CW affiliate. Tribune also owns the FOX station in Indy. The move will cost WISH about half of its revenue, according to one media analyst, who added it will serve as a warning to other network affiliated…
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    Common Sense Journalism

  • RIP: Dan Lynch

    19 Aug 2014 | 6:13 am
    Sad news from Fort Wayne that former Journal Gazette editorial cartoonist Dan Lynch has died.Dan was on staff when I got there and was genuinely a fun guy to work with. He trundled off to Kansas City for a stint and Steve Sack, now in Minneapolis, took his spot for a bit.But Dan returned to the Fort Wayne fold, poking fun at the city and its pols (which is kind of like shooting fish in a barrel), until a stroke sidelined him in 2001. I always liked his clean and to the point style.  I hope I still have in my files a couple of Dan's drawings that he graciously shared. Dan and his work…
  • Gannett's Asheville editor is frank about the changes

    7 Aug 2014 | 11:34 am
    With all the turmoil at Gannett this week, Columbia Journalism Review's Corey Hutchins has landed a rather frank interview with Joshua Awtry, editor overseeing the Asheville Citizen-Times in North Carolina and The Greenville News in South Carolina.Among some of Awtry's lines:"I will not hire a digital producer who doesn’t have a strong grasp of editing.""The Carolinas will have a full-time beer reporter. Right now, both Asheville and Greenville have beer reporters in different fashions. Asheville has a reporter who does a lot of beer coverage but has to pick up other things too. In…
  • It's almost always 'rebut,' not 'refute'

    2 Aug 2014 | 5:00 am
    The State newspaper in Columbia has suddenly, in recent months, seemed to get tangled up about "rebut" versus "refute." Maybe they don't go over this at the editing hub up north or whatever.Tonight's entry:Unless you're taking the PGA's side in this, the word is "rebuts" -- or, even better, "denies," which is the word used in the story's lede."Refutes" implies that you've taken sides and decided that one party has essentially proved its argument.It's not an inconsequential nuance, especially in headline type, for professional writers and editors who are supposed to know better.
  • More SC FOIA follies from the AP's Jeffrey Collins

    29 Jul 2014 | 10:07 am
    The AP's Jeffrey Collins provides this image on Facebook today of a North Augusta police report:Here is his explanation:I'm not a big fan of calling myself words like watchdog. But I do like to verify information governments want to give out. Sometimes it's not the whole story. Sometimes, it isn't true. I wanted to talk to the woman who called police on the 9-year-old girl at the park in North Augusta. Maybe she regrets the decision now. Maybe she saw something really dangerous that is not in the police report. But the Solicitor's Office blacked out all the identifying information about her.
  • How not to do customer service in 2014, newspaper version

    28 Jul 2014 | 8:35 pm
    So here's a wager for you (I'll provide a copy of AP's newswriting guide by Jack Cappon to the first person who can figure out the puzzle).One condition: You must be a seven-day print and digital subscriber to The State newspaper.The setup: Go to the newspaper's website. Pretend you want to look at various pricing to see if, as a consumer, there are options to consider. Try to find where it lists your subscription options other than your existing seven-day-plus-digital subscription.That's OK, I'll wait.Try the FAQs. See anything there (of course, that they haven't been updated since November…
 
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    Pacific Standard

  • Of Course I Behaved Like a Jerk, I Was Just Watching ‘Jersey Shore’

    Tom Jacobs
    20 Aug 2014 | 4:00 am
    For some of us, the success of the television reality show Jersey Shore is emblematic of the end of civilization. New research doesn’t go quite that far, but it does suggest the program, and others like it, can influence viewers’ behavior for the worse. It finds watching “reality shows” of that variety, in which cast members habitually attack or undermine their rivals, appears to raise the aggression level of viewers. What’s more, this effect is more pronounced than it is for watching violent fictional crime dramas. Snooki and the gang are apparently more relatable than, say,…
  • Concluding Remarks About Housing Affordability and Supply Restricitions

    Jim Russell
    20 Aug 2014 | 2:00 am
    In my last post, I referenced a Federal Reserve Bank of Cleveland commentary about rent inflation in the United States. The authors suggest that metros with a housing supply problem should sport lower vacancy rates. The Fed looks at a few places where the vacancy rate changes over time don’t match the measured rent inflation. Supply would seem to be disconnected from price. For why that’s neither here nor there, read this post about how supply restrictions are to blame for high rents. If I buy this argument, then I have to wonder if the Fed’s analysis is credible. Turning…
  • Can Lawmakers Only Make Laws That Corporations Allow?

    Jay Livingston
    19 Aug 2014 | 4:00 pm
    We refer to senators and congressional representatives as “lawmakers.” We democratically elect these people so that they can write and enact laws. But every so often the curtain parts, and we get a glimpse of who’s writing the laws, though these are usually laws that don’t make headlines. There was that time during the Bush years when corporate lobbyists were sitting right next to elected representatives—mostly Republican—at a committee hearing, telling them what to say. The GOP defenders got all huffy at those who had pointed out who was really running the legislation show.
  • Our Coverage of the Ongoing Protests in Ferguson, Missouri

    Footnotes
    19 Aug 2014 | 3:47 pm
    AUGUST 14 We All Live in Ferguson Unconstitutional violence perpetrated by police against people of color, minorities, and vulnerable populations is all too normal. AUGUST 16 Six Days in Ferguson: Voices From the Protests A day-by-day chronology of what happened in Ferguson, drawn from the best reporting by journalists and witnesses on the ground. AUGUST 18 Ferguson Is a Serious Outlier One black city council member is not nearly enough. In a study of city councils, only one place in America had a greater representational disparity than Ferguson, Missouri. AUGUST 18 When Did You Learn About…
  • The Most Popular Posts on PSmag.com and Other Stuff We Liked This Past Week

    Footnotes
    19 Aug 2014 | 3:40 pm
    Every week, we share with you our top posts and some of our favorite reads from across the Web. Get all of this—and more—directly in your inbox by signing up for our twice-weekly newsletter. Last week, we learned about what “home” means to different people and entities, and we explored the research behind what’s happening in Ferguson. But, no surprise, the traffic juggernauts were stories about relationships and booze. 1. Poached Partners Make Unreliable Mates 2. The Truth We Won’t Admit: Drinking Is Healthy 3. Just Kill All the Comments Already 4. The Painful…
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    ProPublica: Articles and Investigations

  • New York City Will Pay $10 Million to Settle Wrongful Conviction Case

    ProPublica
    19 Aug 2014 | 5:18 pm
    by Joaquin Sapien New York City has agreed to pay $10 million to settle a wrongful conviction lawsuit filed by Jabbar Collins, who spent 15 years in prison for a murder he did not commit. The settlement announced today concludes a decades-long struggle for Collins, now 42. He was just 22 when he was sent to Green Haven Correctional Facility in upstate New York for the 1994 murder of Brooklyn landlord Abraham Pollack. In the years that followed, Collins turned his cell into a full-fledged jailhouse lawyer's office. He filed Freedom of Information Requests, re-interviewed witnesses, and taught…
  • Interview With Civil Rights Legend John Lewis: Audio

    ProPublica
    19 Aug 2014 | 12:52 pm
    by Nikole Hannah-Jones ProPublica Read article Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Comment Donate In 1964, John Lewis was a barrier-breaking Freedom Rider, among the first to launch sit-ins and travel the country recruiting college students to travel to the deepest South for Freedom Summer. Now a longtime congressman, he is the only speaker left from the pivotal 1963 March on Washington. Listen to his interview with ProPublica’s Nikole Hannah-Jones on his reflections on that fateful summer. (Full disclosure: This is a low-fi recording with all the audio hallmarks of reporting: pen…
  • Long a Force for Progress, a Freedom Summer Legend Looks Back

    ProPublica
    19 Aug 2014 | 10:00 am
    by Nikole Hannah-Jones ProPublica Listen Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Comment Donate Eli Meir Kaplan, special to ProPublica Dispatches from Freedom Summer Long a Force for Progress, a Freedom Summer Legend Looks Back Georgia Congressman John Lewis talks about what changed — and didn’t — because of the movement he helped to lead 50 years ago. by Nikole Hannah-Jones August 19, 2014 Rep. John Lewis, D-Ga., is the most iconic living veteran of the Civil Rights Movement, the sole survivor of the leaders known as the Big Six. He is the only speaker left from the pivotal…
  • The Best Reporting on Federal Push to Militarize Local Police

    ProPublica
    19 Aug 2014 | 6:30 am
    by Hanqing Chen Protests have continued for more than a week since the fatal police shooting of 18-year-old Michael Brown in Ferguson, Mo. Police officers initially met protesters with full riot gear, armored vehicles and assault rifles, escalating tensions and leading Gov. Jay Nixon to replace the St. Louis County Police Department with the Missouri State Highway Patrol, saying the St. Louis suburb looked like “a war zone." The militarization of St. Louis and other local police departments can be traced to two major sources – the federal 1033 Program, a section of the…
  • What to Look For In Dueling Autopsies of Michael Brown

    ProPublica
    18 Aug 2014 | 3:17 pm
    by A.C. Thompson In the next few weeks, separate teams of doctors will issue autopsy reports about Michael Brown, the unarmed African American shot to death by a police officer in Ferguson, Missouri. If history is any guide, they will differ, perhaps significantly, on how to interpret the gunshot wounds on his body. Michael Baden, the veteran medical examiner chosen to autopsy the body by Brown's family, has released the preliminary results of his autopsy and both the St. Louis County Medical Examiner and U.S. Justice Department have announced plans to conduct or commission separate post…
 
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    Reporting on Health

  • Bed Count: Should hospitals be headquarters for health care?

    William Heisel
    20 Aug 2014 | 4:00 am
    Are reporters placing too much emphasis on hospitals and not enough emphasis on the overall health of the community and the factors that influence it? The forces ultimately shaping our health aren't always the obvious ones.
  • Why electronic medical records are a disaster for some docs

    MDMD
    19 Aug 2014 | 10:00 am
    Electronic medical records held out the promise of a better future, with everyone reaping the benefits. In reality, poorly designed systems slow doctors down, hinder the doctor-patient relationship, and often get things wrong. Doctors and patients deserve better solutions.
  • For the healthiest weight, the past is as important as the present

    William Heisel
    18 Aug 2014 | 4:00 am
    Is a bit overweight actually the healthiest weight of all? A recent JAMA study suggested as much. But a new analysis of the data reveals a deep flaw in the original study, and provides a lesson in the value of questioning how data are collected and used in any given study.
  • Biotech industry launches 'Feed the World' campaign

    Martha Rosenberg
    17 Aug 2014 | 7:35 am
    A new campaign from Elanco, Eli Lilly's animal division, calls unadulterated food a luxury and even blames pure food activists for world hunger
  • A new Boston nanny hits the news

    Sue Luttner
    14 Aug 2014 | 6:19 pm
    Nearly twenty years after the trial of British au pair Louise Woodward brought shaken baby syndrome into the headlines, the case of Irish nanny Aisling Brady McCarthy has raised the subject again in Boston newspapers, where reporters are still fresh from a different controversial diagnosis.
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    SixEstate

  • ‘Journopreneurs,’ Native Advertising, and Brand Journalism

    Katie McCaskey
    7 Aug 2014 | 4:00 am
    Native advertising? Shouldn’t there be a more politically correct term for it? As a John Oliver fan (see: net neutrality), I was pleased to discover he recently covered “native advertising.” I favor Oliver’s researched comedy and was eager to see his take on it. In his sketch, “native content” refers to both overt product placement and less transparent sponsored material. Or, in a phrase, “corporate influence.” As Jason Abbruzzese summarizes: “Many critics argue, as Oliver does, that at best native advertising is a form of trickery and at…
  • A Social Media Toolkit

    George Williams
    4 Aug 2014 | 4:00 am
    These days there are so many different platforms — blogs, Twitter, Facebook, etc. — that managing them all without assistance can be massively cumbersome. Today I’m going to take a look at some of the key tools that can help you administer your online communications campaign. BuzzSumo – This dandy little tool lets you look at the most shared links on various social networks as well as the influencers for specific topics on those platforms. It covers Google+ shares, Facebook likes, LinkedIn shares, and Twitter shares. It’s available at everyone’s favorite…
  • Brand Journalism: Not the Worst Job in America

    Katie McCaskey
    30 Jul 2014 | 4:00 am
    If you had a choice: would you rather work as a lumberjack or as enlisted military personnel? These two occupations sandwich the occupation of “newspaper reporter,” which a 2014 survey declared “Now Only Second Worst Job in America!” Reporters got the short end of the ranking stick because, as Tina Nguyen summarizes, they make “on average, $37,090 a year, and also report absurdly high levels of stress, terrible work environments, and poor hiring outlooks.” So what’s a journalist to do? One option is to buy access to a guide to tell you all about…
  • Social Media Screening: Beware the Pitfalls!

    George Williams
    28 Jul 2014 | 4:00 am
      (Please note that none of this constitutes legal advice. This article is meant to delineate some best practices you can observe, but it is always worthwhile to seek legal counsel to ascertain the particulars of your local laws.) Screening Potential Employees If you’re reading this, chances are that you either already use social media for business or are considering doing so. I often write about social media’s use in the promotional arena, but today we are going to take a look at another important facet of using social media in business: screening new employees. Now it…
  • No One Wants to Hear Your Sales Pitch

    George Williams
    21 Jul 2014 | 4:00 am
    Welcome to 2014, a year when the audience is media-savvy and the pace is faster than Speedy Gonzales’. For anyone with a product or message, the potential reach provided by the Internet is like a dangling carrot. The promise of quickly reaching millions is irresistible, which accounts for the deluge of marketing that comes with every online experience. Ad Saturation Do you use Gmail? Then you see ads every time you check your mail. Do you read blogs? Many of them, from large to small, have ads served into the body of their posts, the sidebar, or both. Pop-ups, banner ads, sponsored…
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    Joe Gullo

  • A Hint of Fall

    Joe Gullo
    19 Aug 2014 | 7:16 pm
    Noticed some of the leaves starting to change in the Burlington, Vermont area. They actually started to change on some trees in the beginning of August. Mostly all of the trees, however, are still green. The post A Hint of Fall appeared first on Joe Gullo.
  • How Many MRAPs Does Your State Have?

    Joe Gullo
    16 Aug 2014 | 10:11 pm
    How many Mine-Resistant Ambush Protected Vehicles (MRAPs) does your state have? Click on a state to find out. According to the New York Times, there are 432 MRAPs across the United States. That’s not all, there are 435 other armored vehicles; 44,900 night vision pieces; 533 aircraft; 93,763 machine guns; and 180,718 magazines. The Pentagon does not push this equipment, the Times reports, it’s based on available military equipment and police department requests. States highlighted in white have 0 MRAPs. Lighter blue colored states have less MRAPS than darker colored ones. Data…
  • Get Interactive Content on Your Website

    Joe Gullo
    16 Aug 2014 | 3:54 pm
    Interactive content is an excellent way to engage and keep people on your website. The web allows content producers to add multiple multimedia to help tell a story. These elements, maps, timelines, and charts can tell a story in ways that text and even images can’t. If you’re looking for interactive content for your blog or website I can create them free of charge. All I ask is for is attribution back to my site. Send your requests. The post Get Interactive Content on Your Website appeared first on Joe Gullo.
  • A Trip to Maine

    Joe Gullo
    13 Aug 2014 | 5:35 pm
    Here are some photos from my recent trip to Maine with Dana and her family. It was a glorious 4 day trip with beautiful warm weather during the day and cool dry nights. Couldn’t have asked for better weather. As always, vacations end way too soon! The post A Trip to Maine appeared first on Joe Gullo.
  • Facebook Users Not Happy With Being Forced to Use Messenger App

    Joe Gullo
    13 Aug 2014 | 6:27 am
    Many Facebook users are not happy about being forced to use the Messenger app to communicate on mobile devices. Previously, users were able to communicate directly with their friends and family through the Facebook app. The changes, according to TechCrunch, came earlier this month. While these changes may annoy or bother some Facebook users, Social Times says that the messenger app market is growing. It makes sense for Facebook from a business stand-point to make this change. I’m curious to see whether or not this change will drive people away from Facebook’s Messenger app or will…
 
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    The Hungry and Foolish

  • Steve Ballmer Steps Down From Microsoft Board

    Kevin Wild
    19 Aug 2014 | 6:20 pm
    Given my confidence and the multitude of new commitments I am taking on now, I think it would be impractical for me to continue to serve on the board, and it is best for me to move off. The fall will be hectic between teaching a new class and the start of the NBA season so my departure from the board is effective immediately.In short: good luck, have fun.Permalink
  • Robin Williams, Comedic Genius, Dies at 63

    Kevin Wild
    11 Aug 2014 | 8:21 pm
    A genius gone too soon.Robin Williams, the comedian who evolved into the surprisingly nuanced, Academy Award-winning actor, imbuing his performances with wild inventiveness and a kind of manic energy, died on Monday at his home in Tiburon, Calif., north of San Francisco. He was 63.Permalink
  • Report: YouTube Buying Twitch for $1 Billion

    Kevin Wild
    19 May 2014 | 6:37 am
    Based upon their own projections, Twitch can't maintain this rate of growth. Sources with Variety report that YouTube is nearing a deal to buy Twitch, the popular game streaming startup, for $1 billion. The deal is said to be an all-cash offer and will close "imminently," according to Variety; The Wall Street Journal, however, has followed up with a report claiming that discussions are "early" and that "a deal isn't imminent." The move, if it succeeds, would effectively put one of the web's most highly trafficked sites firmly in Google's hands.Presumably,…
  • Facebook Building a New Snapchat Competitor

    Kevin Wild
    18 May 2014 | 2:34 pm
    Yeah, good luck with that.Facebook is taking Snapchat very seriously after its failed attempt to purchase the video and picture messaging app for $3 billion last year. Mark Zuckerberg is personally supervising an internal effort to build a competing "ephemeral messaging" app, according to a new report from the Financial Times. Details are slim on the video-messaging app, but, like Snapchat, it'd take just a few clicks to share videos and pictures that would disappear after one view. If the rumors are accurate, it's being called "Slingshot" internally and it could be…
  • The Evolution of the $150 Cellphone

    Kevin Wild
    16 May 2014 | 8:56 pm
    It's features like these that remind me how far we've come.Smartphones are an ever more important part of our work, our play, and our lives. They're getting cheaper, and better — and soon, they'll be cheap enough that everyone in the world will be able to afford them. One day soon, flip phones will finally die the death they so richly deserve.Permalink
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