Journalism

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  • Lawmaker's astroturf op-ed disappears from newspaper's site (UPDATED)

    Columbia Journalism Review
    25 Jul 2014 | 3:03 pm
    UPDATE, July 25: Rivers’ op-ed appears to have been pulled by The Post and Courier. The link to the commentary now goes to a page that reads, “Error 404 - This page is either no longer available or has been relocated.” A search for phrases from the op-ed on the paper's site yielded no results. Charles Rowe, the editorial page...
  • Your head will spin: Uses of 'naught,' 'aught,' and 'ought'

    Columbia Journalism Review
    28 Jul 2014 | 12:50 pm
    If someone says "I know aught about football," the amount of knowledge could be a lot or nothing. That's because "aught" can mean "everything," or "zero." In British English, it often means "all," as in "for aught I know, football uses a round ball." In the US, it more commonly means "nothing." Garner's Modern American Usage says that was originally...
  • No silver bullets

    BuzzMachine
    Jeff Jarvis
    18 Jul 2014 | 11:33 am
    Lewis DVorkin performed a miracle with Forbes … almost. He almost rescued a dying brand, almost helped get it sold to a new owner, and almost rescued the Forbes family and its no-doubt-regretful investor Elevation Partners. I respect Lewis’ inventiveness and innovation. He has done the best he could with the brand he had. But there’s only so much that can be done urgently with old media on the descent. As Steve Forbes himself said announcing the sale of a majority stake in his company to a group of Asian private-equity investors and cataloguing how his business used to be…
  • Sarah Palin Wants A Piece Of Fox's Audience (And She's Employed By Fox)

    Media Matters for America - Latest Items
    28 Jul 2014 | 9:09 am
    The Fox News Channel has more competition for its conservative audience, this time from one of its own employees. Sarah Palin is launching the Sarah Palin Channel, an online "news channel" that will "cut through the media's politically correct filter" and address "the issues that the mainstream media won't talk about." Rupert Murdoch launched his Fox News Channel in similar fashion by decrying the alleged liberal bias of the media, and targeting his channel to a disaffected audience. Palin is a Fox News contributor who has a rocky history with her employer. Earlier…
  • EMR Streaming in Go

    Open
    By JP ROBINSON
    10 Jul 2014 | 8:38 am
    On our platform teams, we use Amazon’s Elastic MapReduce (EMR) service to help us gather useful metrics from log files. We have processes that capture log files, then compress and push them to Amazon S3 for archiving. This pattern builds up massive amounts of information going back several years and, thanks to EMR, it’s all available to us for data crunching. Initially, we used Python for a lot of the heavy lifting, but over time we came to rely on Go. In the Beginning When we first started using EMR, my team wrote the mapper and reducer scripts in Python. We chose Python because it…
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    Columbia Journalism Review

  • Your head will spin: Uses of 'naught,' 'aught,' and 'ought'

    28 Jul 2014 | 12:50 pm
    If someone says "I know aught about football," the amount of knowledge could be a lot or nothing. That's because "aught" can mean "everything," or "zero." In British English, it often means "all," as in "for aught I know, football uses a round ball." In the US, it more commonly means "nothing." Garner's Modern American Usage says that was originally...
  • Girl's foul-ball injury raises a question: When should the media withhold a name?

    28 Jul 2014 | 9:07 am
    MIAMI, FL — When a 6-year-old girl was hit in the face by a foul ball and seriously injured during an Atlanta Braves game in 2010, the story seemed straightforward, if tragic. But four years later, the story has forced Atlanta reporters to consider a complex ethical issue: when, and whether, to withhold the identity of a subject. It’s a...
  • The Guardian experiments with crowdsourcing translations

    28 Jul 2014 | 8:00 am
    Speakers of English, French, German, Spanish, Italian, Hindi, or Arabic can explore the Guardian's new multimedia project on World War I in their native language. Those who are not might hope that someone will volunteer to translate the piece--anyone with proficiency in a language that the project, launched Wednesday, does not currently feature, can send the team an email and...
  • Journalists subpoenaed in 'pink-slime' suit

    25 Jul 2014 | 3:17 pm
    At least four journalists and a writer have been ordered to hand over documents to attorneys representing the largest manufacturer of "pink slime," the latest development in Beef Products Inc.'s $1.2-billion defamation lawsuit against ABC News and others. Three journalists from Food Safety News were served subpoenas Wednesday compelling them to turn over correspondence with ABC and other defendants, according...
  • Lawmaker's astroturf op-ed disappears from newspaper's site (UPDATED)

    25 Jul 2014 | 3:03 pm
    UPDATE, July 25: Rivers’ op-ed appears to have been pulled by The Post and Courier. The link to the commentary now goes to a page that reads, “Error 404 - This page is either no longer available or has been relocated.” A search for phrases from the op-ed on the paper's site yielded no results. Charles Rowe, the editorial page...
 
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    BuzzMachine

  • No silver bullets

    Jeff Jarvis
    18 Jul 2014 | 11:33 am
    Lewis DVorkin performed a miracle with Forbes … almost. He almost rescued a dying brand, almost helped get it sold to a new owner, and almost rescued the Forbes family and its no-doubt-regretful investor Elevation Partners. I respect Lewis’ inventiveness and innovation. He has done the best he could with the brand he had. But there’s only so much that can be done urgently with old media on the descent. As Steve Forbes himself said announcing the sale of a majority stake in his company to a group of Asian private-equity investors and cataloguing how his business used to be…
  • Send your comment to the FCC on net neutrality. Here’s mine.

    Jeff Jarvis
    12 Jul 2014 | 11:26 am
    We’ve received about 647k #netneutrality comments so far. Keep your input coming — 1st round of comments wraps up July 15. — Tom Wheeler (@TomWheelerFCC) July 11, 2014 I just filed my comments on net neutrality with the FCC, adding to the 647,000 already there. You should, too. It’s quick. It’s easy. It’s important. It’s democracy. Do it here. And do it by July 15, the deadline. [Note: The deadline was extended to July 18.] Here’s mine: I am Jeff Jarvis, professor and director of the Tow-Knight Center for Entrepreneurial Journalism at the City…
  • Friendly skies

    Jeff Jarvis
    22 Jun 2014 | 3:09 pm
    I was five hours late returning from San Francisco to home yesterday but I was remarkably calm and sanguine about the delay. Why? Because I was well-informed and well-cared-for. And that was the case because this year I joined the secret society of most-frequent travelers and ticket buyers on United: Global Services. We were taxiing out to the runway at SFO for our agonizingly early 6:45 a.m. flight when the pilot said a gauge wasn’t acting properly. Back to the gate we went (and I was amused that my United app showed us arriving before we’d taken off). Much testing and…
  • The German war against the link

    Jeff Jarvis
    20 Jun 2014 | 7:29 am
    German publishers are not just fighting Google. They are fighting the link and thus the essence of the internet. Half the major publishers in Germany have started a process of arbitration — which, no doubt, will lead to suits — to demand that Google pay them for quoting from and thus linking to their content. And now we know how much they think they deserve: 11% of Google’s revenue related to their snippets. From their government filing, they want a cut of “gross sales, including foreign sales” that come “directly and indirectly from making excerpts from…
  • If you teach entrepreneurial journalism….

    Jeff Jarvis
    14 Jun 2014 | 9:35 am
    Here’s the schedule for our July 10 summit of entrepreneurial journalism educators at CUNY’s Tow-Knight Center for same. Good news: We have a *limited* budget to help with travel for those who need it thanks to the Scripps Howard Foundation. If you teach (or plan to teach) entrepreneurial journalism, sign up now.
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    Media Matters for America - Latest Items

  • Sarah Palin Wants A Piece Of Fox's Audience (And She's Employed By Fox)

    28 Jul 2014 | 9:09 am
    The Fox News Channel has more competition for its conservative audience, this time from one of its own employees. Sarah Palin is launching the Sarah Palin Channel, an online "news channel" that will "cut through the media's politically correct filter" and address "the issues that the mainstream media won't talk about." Rupert Murdoch launched his Fox News Channel in similar fashion by decrying the alleged liberal bias of the media, and targeting his channel to a disaffected audience. Palin is a Fox News contributor who has a rocky history with her employer. Earlier…
  • The Conservative War Over Impeachment

    28 Jul 2014 | 8:37 am
    There's a brewing conservative media war over whether to impeach President Obama. Largely relegated to the fringe for years, the prospect of impeachment has been invigorated thanks to conservative media figures like Fox News contributors Sarah Palin and Allen West, who have spent recent weeks loudly demanding Obama's removal from office. But not everyone in conservative media is on board, with several prominent figures arguing that impeachment is ill-fated, politically toxic, and could severely damage Republicans' chances in the upcoming 2014 midterm elections.    Last…
  • WSJ Attacks Efforts To Fix Conservative Case Law That Allows Discrimination Against Pregnant Women

    28 Jul 2014 | 2:18 am
    The Wall Street Journal took a stand against fair treatment for pregnant workers, complaining that the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission's (EEOC) new guidelines designed to fight pregnancy discrimination despite conservative Supreme Court opinions holding discrimination against pregnant women is not sex discrimination was a "radical" reading of federal law. Last week, the EEOC issued new guidelines to employers in an effort to curb increasing incidents of pregnancy discrimination in the workplace -- the first time in 30 years the agency had updated its guidelines regarding fair…
  • Limbaugh Revises Obama's Remarks To Cast Him As Apathetic On Female Genital Mutilation

    28 Jul 2014 | 1:05 am
    Rush Limbaugh accused President Obama of refusing to rebuke the practice of female genital mutilation while speaking to a group of young African leaders, cherry-picking from his remarks to mischaracterize Obama's very clear condemnation of the practice as a "barbaric" tradition that "needs to be eliminated." President Obama spoke on Monday at a town-hall-style meeting honoring the Washington Fellowship For Young African Leaders, urging guests to abandon oppressive traditions, such as female genital mutilation and polygamy, in favor of progress. Cherry-picking from Obama's remarks, Rush…
  • Conservatives Blame Democrats For Conservative Impeachment Threats

    27 Jul 2014 | 11:22 pm
    Right-wing media and Republicans are blaming Democrats and President Obama for allegedly "ginning up" the issue of impeachment for political benefit, but that Pandora's Box was opened by conservatives themselves, who have been demanding impeachment since Obama first took office. In an interview with conspiracy website WND (which has its own "Impeachment Store"), Rep. Steve Stockman (R-TX) told conspiracy theorist Jerome Corsi that President Obama "wants us to impeach him now" because "his senior advisors believe that is the only chance the Democratic Party has to…
 
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    Open

  • EMR Streaming in Go

    By JP ROBINSON
    10 Jul 2014 | 8:38 am
    On our platform teams, we use Amazon’s Elastic MapReduce (EMR) service to help us gather useful metrics from log files. We have processes that capture log files, then compress and push them to Amazon S3 for archiving. This pattern builds up massive amounts of information going back several years and, thanks to EMR, it’s all available to us for data crunching. Initially, we used Python for a lot of the heavy lifting, but over time we came to rely on Go. In the Beginning When we first started using EMR, my team wrote the mapper and reducer scripts in Python. We chose Python because it…
  • Improving Article Accessibility

    By CLINT FISHER
    24 Jun 2014 | 8:38 am
    With the redesign and replatform of NYTimes.com in January, we introduced many new features on our article pages. Unfortunately, for our users with disabilities who rely on assistive technology, the new features hindered usability. Before the article redesign, most of our assistive technology users went to our print preview version, which contained only the article text, to avoid having their screen readers interrupted by content outside of the flow of the article. By removing the print preview feature (the redesign allowed us to leverage the print capabilities of modern browsers to improve…
  • Scoop: A Glimpse Into the NYTimes CMS

    By LUKE VNENCHAK
    17 Jun 2014 | 11:15 am
    You know the importance of technology to the future of journalism has become a widely accepted fact when a prominent editor decides to join a new company because of its content management system. That’s what Ezra Klein told The New York Times about his decision to leave The Washington Post for Vox Media, a digital publisher with a fancy, custom-built CMS. Klein couldn’t quite describe what made the Vox system so special, but the fact that a journalist said he loved, let alone even tolerated, his CMS was all you needed to know that the world has changed. Suddenly, the CMS, an often derided…
  • Unit Testing With Block Captures

    By MOHIT PANDEY
    27 May 2014 | 11:36 am
    We recently added read-only comments to our iPhone and iPad apps. We have started writing features that can be shared across our apps as CocoaPods, and the comments feature was an excellent candidate for a pod. Going forward, all of our iOS apps will be able to use this feature. We have been striving to add as much test coverage as we can to these pods, and the comments pod was no exception. At its core, the pod makes calls to our comments API and parses the responses; then it calls the completion handler that was passed to it and uses NSURLConnection sendAsynchronousRequest to do the actual…
  • Building Blackbeard: A Syndication System Powered By Play, Scala and Akka

    By SUMAN ROY and KRISHNA SUNDARESAN
    13 May 2014 | 7:59 am
    The NYTimes News Service/Syndicate division distributes content to other publications. Our syndication business is growing and, until recently, was managed with a legacy desktop-based CMS, which did not integrate well with our web publishing system. We decided to shift away from this system, and our editors needed a new authoring and syndication tool. This application, which we named Blackbeard, needed a document editor with the ability to track changes and other features like real-time dashboards. Backbone.js (coupled with ice) has served us well in the past and was an easy choice. However,…
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    The Linchpen

  • Block Chains for News

    Greg Linch
    17 Jul 2014 | 10:04 pm
    Anil Dash’s piece on applying an underlying concept of Bitcoin to track digital art has me thinking about the potential applications of  block chains for news. As he writes: What the technology behind Bitcoin enables, in short, is the ability to track online trading of a digital object, without relying on any one central authority, by using the block chain as the ledger of transactions. What if we built a block chain system for news? Recording and verifying facts, data, updates, quotes, people, etc like the Bitcoin protocol tracks transactions in a database that no one owns, but of…
  • Jorge Luis Borges on “the task of art”

    Greg Linch
    20 Apr 2014 | 2:21 pm
    “The task of art is to transform what is continuously happening to us, to transform all these things into symbols, into music, into something that can last in man’s memory. That is our duty. If we don’t fulfill it, we feel unhappy. A writer or any artist has the joyful duty to transform all that into symbols. These symbols could be colors, forms or sounds. For a poet, the symbols are sounds and also words, fables, stories, poetry. The work of a poet never ends. It has nothing to do with working hours. You are continuously receiving things from the external world. These must…
  • Of aquariums and arcades: John Cage and Walter Benjamin

    Greg Linch
    19 Mar 2014 | 10:26 pm
    An interesting remark in the preface to avant-garde composer John Cage’s 1969 book, Notations: A precedent for the absence of information which characterizes this book is the contemporary aquarium (no longer a dark hallway with each species in its own illuminated tank separated from the others and named in Latin): a large glass house with all the fish in it swimming as in an ocean. This aquarium metaphor immediately reminded me of another work: Walter Benjamin‘s Arcades Project. Both represent examples of literary montage — collections where the author’s primary…
  • Seinfeld’s “nothing” and John Cage’s “silence”

    Greg Linch
    11 Mar 2014 | 9:20 pm
    Seinfeld called itself a “show about nothing.” The following video (via Lauren Rabaino) captures this cleverly by compiling moments of “nothing.” As I watched, the stark “nothingess” compressed together in such a literal way reminded me of John Cage‘s concept of “silence.” The experimental composer’s piece 4’33″ is generally referred to as his “silent” piece. But, like Seinfeld, it is — despite its label — not silent at all. For Cage, it’s about the shifting the focus from the performer to…
  • #ONA13 workshop materials: Using WordPress to Structure your Beat

    Greg Linch
    17 Oct 2013 | 11:45 am
    Materials from the structure your beat session that Stephanie Yiu, Connor Jennings and I presented. Examples Politifact http://www.politifact.com/ (using Django for structure) - statements - people (politicians and now pudits) - legislative bills - commercials - states - true/false spectrum of fact checks Technically Philly http://technical.ly/philly/ http://technical.ly/philly/directory/ (uses WordPress) - people - organizations - projects - expertise Homicide Watch http://homicidewatch.org/ (uses Django for structure, WordPress for posts) Kaiser Family Foundation has 30+ Custom Post…
 
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    Mediashift

  • Daily Must Reads, July 28, 2014

    Julie Keck
    28 Jul 2014 | 6:37 am
    1. At front lines, bearing witness in real time (David Carr / The New York Times) 2. MH17: How Storyful’s ‘social sleuthing’ helped verify evidence (Ben Cardew / The Guardian) 3. With immigration reform off the agenda, some in tech turn to Plan B (Hayley Tsukayama / The Washington Post) 4. The newsonomics of how and why (Ken Doctor / Nieman Lab) 5. 5 tools to transform or enhance text-heavy articles (Drew Sleep / Journalism.co.uk) 6. Amazon opens a ‘create your own’ 3D-printing store (Vlad Savov / The Verge)   Get our newsletters delivered straight to your inbox.
  • How a ‘Dreaded Grammar Test’ Became a Pioneering Model for Bilingual Students

    Allan Richards
    28 Jul 2014 | 3:00 am
    Every now and then I receive a call from a dean or chair of a journalism or communication program. They lament deficiencies in their students’ language skills and writing, and they are calling me because they’ve heard of our school — a multilingual bouillabaisse of an institution with four languages spoken (English, Spanish, Portuguese, and Creole). We’re known for our successful digital English language skills program, including a grammar test that students must pass as a prerequisite to taking our introductory writing course. Many have also heard that our school has…
  • Daily Must Reads, July 25, 2014

    Julie Keck
    25 Jul 2014 | 6:43 am
    1. Bloomberg hires a founder of The Verge to lead online initiatives (Ravi Somaiya / New York Times) 2. Wikipedia blocks anonymous edits (and trolling) from a congressional IP address (Abby Phillip / Washington Post) 3. Major League Baseball cries foul on net neutrality proposal (Amy Schatz / Re/code) 4. Google’s $1B purchase of Twitch confirmed — joins YouTube for new video empire (Dean Takahashi / VentureBeat) 5. Conde Nast’s Golf World magazine goes digital-only (Michael Sebastian / AdAge) 6. Twitter is public, but who does that benefit? (Caroline O’Donovan / Nieman Lab)…
  • Futures Lab Update #68: Rethinking the Story Mix and Training Citizen Videographers

    Reuben Stern
    25 Jul 2014 | 3:00 am
    This week we find out how online news startup Ozy is rethinking news content, and we learn how human rights group Witness works with citizens to generate video reports from the ground. PART 1: Ozy’s story approach The 10-month-old news startup Ozy aims to appeal to smart, educated, curious readers who embrace things that are different. We hear what goes into Ozy’s story and feature mix from from founder and Chief Executive Officer Carlos Watson. Reporting by Tatiana Darie. [To skip directly to this segment in YouTube, click here.] PART 2: Training citizen videographers…
  • How Digital Startups Can Better Deal With Uncertainty

    James Breiner
    25 Jul 2014 | 3:00 am
    When you are starting out with a digital product, it makes sense to get advice from experts. But experts can’t help you learn as much as you can on your own. In fact, most of the successful digital entrepreneurs I know give the same advice: develop a prototypeas quickly as possible. A business plan or a powerpoint is fine, but you need to put your actual product into the hands of the public and test your theories. See if they work. (See the comments of Olga Lucia Lozano, Daniel Eilemberg, Gonzalo Costa, and, in Spanish, Leo Prieto, Gumersindo LaFuente and others.) The thinking of…
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    Newspaper Death Watch

  • What if The New York Times Went Weekly?

    Paul Gillin
    6 Jul 2014 | 6:50 am
    Steve Outing The leaked “innovation” report from The New York Times that made the rounds in May recommends that the company take more risks, move more quickly and consider radical steps to reinvent itself. Steve Outing wonders what would happen if the Times abandoned daily print editions, and he’s built an elaborate “what-if?” model to test the idea. Outing’s model doesn’t answer the question, but it does provide a new tool with which to evaluate options. “Most news companies aren’t very good at grokking what’s coming at them or…
  • Across the Globe, Newspaper Industry is Actually Growing

    Paul Gillin
    17 Jun 2014 | 1:31 pm
    Observers of the cratering newspaper industries in the US and Europe may be surprised at this news: Print newspaper circulation around the world actually increased 2% in 2013 compared to 2012. The pocket of strength comes from rapidly maturing economies in Asia and Latin America, where people who a generation ago might have used newspapers mainly for kindling are now finding them to be valuable for the purposes for which they were intended. That’s the highlights from the latest World Press Trends survey, which was released last by the World Association of Newspapers and News Publishers. The…
  • A Graphical View of Newspaper Innovation

    Paul Gillin
    29 May 2014 | 3:33 am
    The Newspaper Association of America (NAA) was in denial during the early years of the industry’s crash, but lately the organization has been doing good work to highlight the new spirit of innovation that is taking hold across its membership. As the numbers in this infographic demonstrate, U.S. newspapers have a lot to be proud of. They reached 145 million unique visitors in January alone and the Washington Post and New York Times each drove more than a quarter-million tweets each week. One of the things we like most about this infographic is the attribution. Go to the page on the NAA…
  • The New York Times Gives Itself a Good Thrashing

    Paul Gillin
    19 May 2014 | 11:02 am
    A speech in The New York Times newsroom after the announcement of the 2009 Pulitzer Prize winners (Photo credit: Wikipedia) We finally got a chance to read through the 96-page “Innovation” report commissioned by the management of The New York Times and leaked last week in the wake of the firing of Executive Editor Jill Abramson on Tuesday. Joshua Benton at Nieman Journalism Lab has already called the report “one of the most remarkable documents” he’s seen in his tenure, and detailed coverage has appeared on BuzzFeed, Mashable and numerous other outlets. We won’t go into detail…
  • Why Page Views Suck

    Paul Gillin
    7 May 2014 | 12:25 pm
    Are page views your primary measure of success for your website or a story thereupon? Well cut it out. Page views are about as relevant an indicator of content value as the height of the starting center is a predictor of the success of a basketball team. The issue of what online publishers should measure was the topic of a panel at the International Journalism Festival in Perugia last week. Experts debated whether page views have any value at all. We think they don’t. In fact, we think they have negative value. “Provocative headlines and images encourage people to click but it does not…
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    Holovaty.com

  • How to solve CORS IE font issues with Amazon Cloudfront

    Adrian Holovaty
    25 Jul 2014 | 3:42 pm
    I've been wrestling with this for a while, and I finally found a fix! Here's a quick post for developers searching for the solution... The problem If you use Amazon Cloudfront to serve web fonts (.ttf, .woff, .eot, etc.) from your Amazon S3 bucket (as I do for Soundslice), Internet Explorer will likely refuse to load the fonts, giving this error message: CSS3117: @font-face failed cross-origin request. Resource access is restricted. This happens because your media files on Cloudfront are on a separate domain than your site, and Internet Explorer doesn't like the cross-domain requests for…
  • Announcing the Soundslice sheet music player

    Adrian Holovaty
    17 Mar 2014 | 12:04 pm
    Since PJ and I launched Soundslice in November 2012, our top-most requested feature has been support for sheet music. We've spent the last six months building that for you, and we launched it today. Have a look at the demo. Here's a quick video I recorded showing off some of the features and benefits: Lots of stuff is new here: We now render sheet music (aka standard notation), not just tabs and chord charts. Instead of scrolling horizontally (example of old site), the UI is now vertically oriented. This makes it much easier to see upcoming notes, and it's a much more natural experience. The…
  • Why Chicago needs to stop playing by Silicon Valley’s rules

    Adrian Holovaty
    24 Jan 2014 | 12:25 pm
    I gave a talk yesterday at the Chicago Startup Forecast. Here's a rough transcript, with slides. This is Daniel Burnham. He was a famous Chicago architect, responsible for some of our city's most beautiful buildings. He's known for his influential Plan of Chicago, which foresaw modern city planning, and he was a key organizer of the World's Columbian Exposition, also known as the Chicago World's Fair of 1893. Chicago beat out New York, DC and St. Louis for the privilege of hosting that World's Fair. Back in those days, world's fairs were more common than they are now. In 1889, a few years…
  • Adrian and Jacob retiring as Django BDFLs

    Adrian Holovaty
    13 Jan 2014 | 7:30 am
    Since July 2005, when Django was open-sourced, Jacob Kaplan-Moss and I have been the two Benevolent Dictators For Life (BDFLs) of the project. Today we're both retiring from our formal BDFL roles, given that (1) we don't have the time for it that we once had and (2) Django is in great shape with a vibrant community of contributors. A BDFL, a term originally used by Python creator Guido van Rossum, is basically a leader of an open-source project who resolves disputes and has final say on big decisions. In the early days, circa 2004-2008, Jacob and I had to make a fair amount of decisions, and…
  • Google+ and YouTube tech disaster report

    Adrian Holovaty
    17 Nov 2013 | 12:02 pm
    The Google+ / YouTube integration is a disaster. Much has been written about this in the last few days, with people making great points about the value of anonymity and the poor new comment-ranking algorithms. Here's a good roundup of the various issues. These are fantastic points, and I agree with them 100%. But they're fundamentally matters of philosophy. Whether real names are required in comments, whether a Google+ account is required to post comments/videos to YouTube, and how comments should be ranked/sorted — these are all judgment calls made by YouTube's developers and product…
 
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    JackLail.com

  • Good reads on the large life of John Seigenthaler

    Jack Lail
    12 Jul 2014 | 5:56 pm
    (Journalists John Quinn and John Seigenthaler chatting at the First Amendment Center in Nashville, Tennessee, in 2010.) Some good pieces on the large life of John Seigenthaler New York Times: John Seigenthaler, Editor and Aide to Politicians, Dies at 86 Ken Paulson (in USA Today): Seigenthaler a champion of First Amendment The Tennessean: John Seigenthaler, longtime Tennessean editor, dies at 86 NPR: Newspaper Editor, Activist John Seigenthaler Dies At 86 Poynter: John Seigenthaler was a leader of free speech, civil rights and journalism Nashville Scene: Remembering the late John…
  • Reaction to the death of John Seigenthaler

    Jack Lail
    11 Jul 2014 | 7:05 pm
    [View the story "Reaction to John Seigenthaler's death" on Storify]
  • Another year, another year older

    Jack Lail
    16 May 2014 | 12:50 pm
    Researcher Greg Harmon of Borrell Associates says the average age of a print newspaper reader is 57 and the average newspaper web visitor is 51.  Saying the industry's aging demographics ought to have "everyone's hair on fire," Harmon notes that newspaper readers have been getting a year older every year for more than a decade.  -- Alan D. Mutter
  • The weight of establishment and tradition

    Jack Lail
    7 May 2014 | 5:28 am
    A great piece from Om Malik on media. There's lot of food for thought in this piece. Among his highlights: No one could've predicted FB and Twitter as the boosters for media and this is why we've seen so much change and new models. The problem with media is that it's trying to find a answer within itself and not looking at what readers want. The internet as we know it is at an end. The Chinese and Brazilian internets are developing in their own way and pace. Putting a paywall on a thing people were getting for free is a backward move. You must create a new, compelling, useful experience. My…
  • The cheerleader, The Dirty and the court case that could change the Internet forever

    Jack Lail
    1 May 2014 | 1:48 pm
    The fate of a law that was passed in the infancy of the commercial Internet and which created the legal underpinnings for everything from anonymous comments by trolls on news stories to your pet photo on Facebook was argued today in the U.S. Sixth Circuit Court of Appeals in Cincinnati. The case involves a defamation lawsuit by a former Cincinnati Benglas cheerleader against a gossip website.  The cheerleader, Sarah Jones, sued gossip site The Dirty in 2012 claiming allegations on its site about her sex life were untrue. A Federal jury awarded Jones $338,000. In the appeal heard today, The…
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    sans serif

  • India’s first woman journalist Vidya Munshi, RIP

    churumuri
    9 Jul 2014 | 4:59 am
    sans serif records the demise of Vidya Munshi, arguably India’s first woman journalist, in Calcutta on Monday, 7 July 2014.  She was 94 years old. Born in Bombay, she worked in several newspapers and magazines, including a ten-year stint with Russy Karanjia‘s Blitz. A 2006 profile of Ms Munshi in The Telegraph, Calcutta, noted: “At that time (1952-62), she was the Calcutta correspondent of Blitz, a Bombay weekly critical of government policies and excelling in investigative journalism. “One of her ‘scoops’ was on two Canadian pilots who were to fly from Hong Kong…
  • In ‘The Last Mag’, Nishant Patel is Fareed Zakaria

    churumuri
    2 Jul 2014 | 4:45 am
    DILIP CHAWARE writes from New Jersey: The Last Magazine is Michael Hastings’s novel which has been published a year after his death. This controversial young journalist, who worked for Newsweek as a war correspondent, died last year in a car accident in Los Angeles when he was just 33. Very few were aware about this book, which was resurrected from his laptop. The novel, though, is a portrayal of real life within a major news organisation, the nexus between the government and the media and broadly discusses the relevance and future of the print medium. Hastings is back in the news owing to…
  • A rash I&B ministry “advisory” to TV, print media

    churumuri
    26 Jun 2014 | 4:05 am
    When he was health minister in the UPA’s first term, Anbumani Ramadoss made it mandatory for movies and TV channels to show the statutory warning against smoking and drinking each time someone on screen lit a cigarette or sipped a drink. The Telegraph reports that the NDA’s information and broadcasting ministry under Prakash Javadekar has shot off an “advisory” to TV stations and newspapers “against portraying or “glorifying” rash or dangerous driving, as well as helmet-less riding and a failure to fasten car seatbelts.” “All TV channels/ Doordarshan/…
  • Newspaper delivery boy reads papers, enters IIT

    churumuri
    25 Jun 2014 | 7:30 am
    Last year, N. Shiva Kumar, a newspaper vendor in Bangalore—the son of an illiterate mother and a truck driver—cracked CAT 2012 and went to the Indian institute of management, Calcutta, as a student. This year, C. Prashanth, a construction labourer’s son in Mysore, who delivered The Times of India (surely, among other papers) has obtained the 255th rank in the scheduled tribe category. “Prashanth said he couldn’t afford to buy a newspaper but while selling them, he managed to read them and that helped him gain knowledge crack the prestigious exam,” TOI quoted him as…
  • The hottest reporters covering the World Cup*

    churumuri
    19 Jun 2014 | 3:38 am
    The Times of India fills a vital blank in the public discourse: the hottest reporters covering the football World Cup in Brazil— Ines Sainz and Vanessa Huppenkothen. * Search engine optimisation techniques shamelessly at work Raveen Tandon as Shobha De: Glamourous, sexy, brainy, seductive Look, who wants to play Christiane Amanpour: Kareena Kapoor Will the underworld a hot reporter like Gul Panag? Anju Mahendroo plays queen bee of film journalism, Devyani Sheethal Shetty: Anchoring news easier than actingFiled under: A bit of fun, Newspapers, People Tagged: Churumuri, Ines Sainz, Sans…
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    JackLail.com

  • Good reads on the large life of John Seigenthaler

    Jack Lail
    12 Jul 2014 | 5:56 pm
    (Journalists John Quinn and John Seigenthaler chatting at the First Amendment Center in Nashville, Tennessee, in 2010.) Some good pieces on the large life of John Seigenthaler New York Times: John Seigenthaler, Editor and Aide to Politicians, Dies at 86 Ken Paulson (in USA Today): Seigenthaler a champion of First Amendment The Tennessean: John Seigenthaler, longtime Tennessean editor, dies at 86 NPR: Newspaper Editor, Activist John Seigenthaler Dies At 86 Poynter: John Seigenthaler was a leader of free speech, civil rights and journalism Nashville Scene: Remembering the late John…
  • Reaction to the death of John Seigenthaler

    Jack Lail
    11 Jul 2014 | 7:05 pm
    [View the story "Reaction to John Seigenthaler's death" on Storify]
  • Another year, another year older

    Jack Lail
    16 May 2014 | 12:50 pm
    Researcher Greg Harmon of Borrell Associates says the average age of a print newspaper reader is 57 and the average newspaper web visitor is 51.  Saying the industry's aging demographics ought to have "everyone's hair on fire," Harmon notes that newspaper readers have been getting a year older every year for more than a decade.  -- Alan D. Mutter
  • The weight of establishment and tradition

    Jack Lail
    7 May 2014 | 5:28 am
    A great piece from Om Malik on media. There's lot of food for thought in this piece. Among his highlights: No one could've predicted FB and Twitter as the boosters for media and this is why we've seen so much change and new models. The problem with media is that it's trying to find a answer within itself and not looking at what readers want. The internet as we know it is at an end. The Chinese and Brazilian internets are developing in their own way and pace. Putting a paywall on a thing people were getting for free is a backward move. You must create a new, compelling, useful experience. My…
  • The cheerleader, The Dirty and the court case that could change the Internet forever

    Jack Lail
    1 May 2014 | 1:48 pm
    The fate of a law that was passed in the infancy of the commercial Internet and which created the legal underpinnings for everything from anonymous comments by trolls on news stories to your pet photo on Facebook was argued today in the U.S. Sixth Circuit Court of Appeals in Cincinnati. The case involves a defamation lawsuit by a former Cincinnati Benglas cheerleader against a gossip website.  The cheerleader, Sarah Jones, sued gossip site The Dirty in 2012 claiming allegations on its site about her sex life were untrue. A Federal jury awarded Jones $338,000. In the appeal heard today, The…
 
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    Technology

  • It's Facebook, not the Big Brother state, that worries us

    Jamie Bartlett
    23 Jul 2014 | 9:40 am
    For all the worries about Big Brother snaffling our personal data, it turns out that we are more worried by Little Brother – and starting to change our behaviour as a result. A brand new poll of over 2,000 Brits released yesterday by Ipsos-Mori and the Royal Statistical Society has found that British citizens trust [...]
  • Why do all government IT projects seem to fail?

    Willard Foxton
    22 Jul 2014 | 6:56 am
    While I was phoning around this morning for an explanation to why the Government’s latest big IT project has ended with £350 million being flushed down the lavatory, one respected contractor told me: “I just don’t think the UK government should be allowed to buy IT at all. Maybe give them abacuses, but they could [...]
  • 'Right to be forgotten' is having the opposite effect

    Jamie Bartlett
    17 Jul 2014 | 2:52 am
    Following a ruling earlier last month EU citizens have the "right to be forgotten". Well, sort of: Internet search engines are obliged to remove “inadequate”, “irrelevant” or “no longer relevant” information about you from their search results. Most importantly this means Google, which accounts for around 90 per cent of all online searches. You can [...]
  • Forget Silicon Valley: if you want to know what it's like in a start-up, watch Ghostbusters

    Willard Foxton
    16 Jul 2014 | 8:48 am
    Silicon Valley is an HBO show about the ups and downs of working at a start-up – it starts this week on Sky. It does a great job of satirising the culture of Southern California, but it really only captures the experience of a handful of founders – the proverbial Zuckerbergs, kids in T-shirts who [...]
  • Wikiwashing: how paid professionals are using Wikipedia as a PR tool

    Jamie Bartlett
    11 Jul 2014 | 4:42 am
    How I long to have a Wikipedia entry to call my own! It would be a sign I’d arrived, that I’d made it. It would surely help my career no end. And even though I know myself better than anyone, it is unlikely I could write my own as I'd find it impossible to adhere [...]
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    Idea Lab

  • What Works Where? ZoningCheck Makes Zoning Data More Open

    Peter Koht
    24 Jul 2014 | 3:00 am
    A blueprint for a community’s future, the zoning code is incredibly powerful. It will affect where people live, where they work, and how they get in between those two places. When zoning codes are revised, cities have to make huge decisions. Internal borders get redrawn, issues of setback and walkability are discussed. There is a lot of debate about parking and public transit. To most citizens, zoning rules are invisible. But to entrepreneurs, they matter. A lot of money is at stake. A poor choice of location early on can result in lots of red tape, extra fees and lost time. The trouble is,…
  • OpenNews: Why Code for a Newsroom Instead of a Startup?

    Dan Sinker
    22 Jul 2014 | 3:00 am
    In less than a month, on August 16, the search for our 2015 Knight-Mozilla Fellows will come to a close. Knight-Mozilla Fellows do amazing work — they spend 10 months embedded in newsrooms writing code to help solve journalistic problems — but they don’t do that work alone. When you become a Knight-Mozilla Fellow, you join two communities: a community of fellows (both your peers and alumni from the program), and a community of developers working in the newsroom. To mark this final month of our 2015 Fellowship search, we’ve invited many voices to talk about their experiences…
  • Knight Prototype Fund: When Storytelling Meets Civic Action

    Desiree Everts
    17 Jul 2014 | 6:00 am
    Sixteen winners of the Knight Prototype Fund are set to receive $35,000 to help bring their ideas even closer to fruition. The Knight Foundation on Wednesday announced the most recent winners of its fund, which looks to support early-stage media ideas in an effort to push them closer to a formal launch. Several of the projects in this round include tools for journalists and publishers to encourage news development, storytelling, and community engagement. DIY StoryCorps, for instance, is a mobile app that lets anyone create do-it-yourself interviews to record people’s stories. Global…
  • How Data Journalism Can Become a Revenue Supplement for News Organizations

    Jake Batsell
    16 Jul 2014 | 3:00 am
    The byproducts of journalism rarely have value to anyone besides the reporters who gather and assemble the information. (Exhibit A: The troves of spiral notebooks, manila folders and microcassettes left over from my newspaper days, still gathering dust in my garage.) But more news organizations are discovering that cleaned-up, searchable databases have extra value beyond their journalistic utility — and, better yet, can generate revenue to support even more public-interest reporting. In February, ProPublica unveiled its Data Store, offering both free and premium data sets to journalists,…
  • Want to Come Up With a Good Startup Idea? Throw Away a Bunch of Bad Ones

    Zhai Yun Tan
    15 Jul 2014 | 3:00 am
    The startup process is a dramatic roller coaster ride. It’s thrilling when you discover new gold mines, but crushing when you realize that your ideas are not that novel. My team had to go through the ride four times. Looking back, the biggest lesson I learned in the past six months is having the courage to admit the fallibility of an idea, letting it go, and moving on to the next idea. But before letting go of an idea, you must have at least put up a fight and explored all the possibilities available. That’s how we went through four ideas in six months. In the beginning of January, my…
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    Reflections of a Newsosaur

  • Robots could do better than some journalists

    Newsosaur
    22 Jul 2014 | 3:17 pm
    When the Associated Press announced plans to use computers to write corporate earnings stories, a number of journalists asked me if I was as horrified by the prospect as they were.  In fact, I think robots could do better than some reporters. With all respect and affection for my fellow journalists, I have concluded that a well-programmed set of algorithms can be far more analytic and
  • The newspaper crisis, by the numbers

    Newsosaur
    16 Jul 2014 | 5:00 am
    Roughly a decade after the commercial debut of the Internet, America’s newspapers posted record high advertising sales of $49.4 billion in 2005, leading many publishers to think their businesses would not be seriously affected by the digital revolution. But they were wrong.   Since hitting that high note in 2005, the industry has undergone a dramatic and traumatic contraction, losing nearly
  • Newspapers can’t merely dabble at digital

    Newsosaur
    10 Jul 2014 | 5:00 am
    The New York Times wrote the story in 1853 about how Solomon Northup was kidnapped and sold into slavery, but Gawker got most of the page views by publicizing the archived article when “12 Years a Slave” won the Oscar for best picture in 2014.  This example of how the Times fails to capitalize on its rich content to build digital readership, relevance and revenues came to light in the leak
  • An intriguing ‘publishing platform for readers’

    Newsosaur
    23 Jun 2014 | 5:00 am
    An unprecedented collaboration between two leading newspapers and the non-profit Mozilla tech community aims to build a “publishing platform for readers” that could go a long way toward revolutionizing the way we get and give news.   Inasmuch as the undertaking was announced only last week by the New York Times, the Washington Post, Mozilla and the Knight Foundation, there’s no way of knowing
  • Digital publishing metrics: What’s real?

    Newsosaur
    11 Jun 2014 | 5:00 am
    The ecstasy of digital publishing is that it enables the granular measurement of everything from traffic to ad clicks. The agony is trying to figure out which metrics matter. That’s the vexing issue we’re going to tackle today, but, first, let’s get real:   There are more questions than answers and more opinions than facts. Given ongoing advances in technology and analytics, best practices for
 
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    20 headlines from the reading list

  • Grandparents.com Seeks Freelance Pitches on Modern Grandparenting

    28 Jul 2014 | 12:40 pm
    Grandparents.com is a site for the modern grandparent. Its readers are interested in traveling, staying healthy and, of course, finding fun things to do with the grandkids. After all, explains editor-in-chief Ellen Breslau, the average age of a grandparent today is only 52. So freelancers interested in pitching the site should steer clear of stories on hearing aids or assisted living. Instead, Breslau says she wants “more health stories and smart takes on financial matters, such as estate planning or the best part-time jobs for baby boomers.” You should also note: Articles typically…
  • 7 key takeaways from IAB's study on in-feed sponsored content

    28 Jul 2014 | 7:36 am
    Despite demographic and content differences, business and entertainment news users are highly receptive to in-feed sponsored content if it is relevant, authoritative and trustworthy. General news users are the least receptive but also said that they can have a positive experience if the advertising is relevant, authoritative and trustworthy. Well done sponsored content can enhance the credibility of the site and the site’s credibly can enhance the perceived credibility of the in-feed sponsored content (33% lift in perceived credibility of the sponsored content when on credibly…
  • ‘Bellingcat’ Kickstarter Campaign Seeks to Unite Investigative Citizen Journalists

    25 Jul 2014 | 11:23 am
    Citizen journalism is more prevalent than ever with the upsurge in social media platforms. Now that so much information is available at our fingertips, it seems that reporters — both formally trained and novice — are even hungrier for accurate news. A crowdfunding campaign by a man named Eliot Higgins has the goal of bringing together citizen journalists who are curious about hard news issues through an open-source website. His vision is for contributors all over the world to continue coverage of “Syria, Iraq, Turkey, Kurdistan, Nigeria, Jihadists, Shia armed groups, the UK…
  • Friday Roundup: The Week in Journalism

    25 Jul 2014 | 5:00 am
    If anyone complained about dog days of summer in the newsroom, this week you got what you wished for. Here are some highlights in all of the chaos that was the news this week: 1) You can’t win if you’re covering Gaza. John Stewart illustrated this best in a skit on Monday night. And the New York Observer called out the New York Times for what it thinks is biased coverage of recent events. The ‘paper of record’ doesn’t think it’s doing anything wrong. What about you? How have you been staying objective — or have you decided to ditch that effort? BREAKING: Dutch military…
  • "One of the toughest but most important parts of designing products – deciding what to trim as you..."

    24 Jul 2014 | 9:48 am
    “One of the toughest but most important parts of designing products – deciding what to trim as you move forward.” - —Jon Wiley, Lead Designer on Google Search Why Google Killed Your Favorite Feature
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    Poynter. » MediaWire

  • Survey: Women and minorities on TV and radio reach a high that’s still pretty low

    Kristen Hare
    28 Jul 2014 | 11:51 am
    RTDNA The number of minorities at radio stations reached a ’90s-era high, and women news directors in TV reached an all-time high according to the latest report, released Monday afternoon, from RTDNA/Hofstra University Annual Survey. Still, as far as minorities are concerned, the bigger picture remains unchanged. In the last 24 years, the minority population in the U.S. has risen 11 points; but the minority workforce in TV news is up less than half that (4.6), and the minority workforce in radio is up 2.2. Some other points from the report: – In TV news, minorities made up more…
  • Do local news orgs need national news?

    Sam Kirkland
    28 Jul 2014 | 10:40 am
    NetNewsCheck | The New York Times Former Project Thunderdome editor-in-chief Jim Brady asks whether local news organizations need to provide much national news anymore in a reflection on his time at the now-shuttered Digital First Media venture. Writes Brady, a member of Poynter’s National Advisory Board: “Do we think local news organizations — in the disaggregated Web world we live in and the even more atomic mobile world we’re speeding into — actually need much national news anymore?” DFM announced the shuttering of Thunderdome in April, and it officially closed…
  • 100 years later: Looking back at the start of World War I

    Kristen Hare
    28 Jul 2014 | 10:30 am
    In this undated file photo, Prussian soldiers leaving Berlin for the front are given flowers by a woman during World War One. (AP Photo, File) The Guardian | Newseum | Daily Telegraph | The New York Times | BBC | Associated Press One hundred years after the start of World War I “it is sobering to look back at the way that conflict was so badly reported,” Roy Greenslade wrote for The Guardian on Sunday. Greenslade writes about censorship and propaganda that came from inside and outside journalism at the time. The catalogue of journalistic misdeeds is a matter of record: the…
  • Fareed Zakaria to join Atlantic Media as contributing editor

    Benjamin Mullin
    28 Jul 2014 | 9:25 am
    The Atlantic Fareed Zakaria, host of CNN’s “Fareed Zakaria GPS,” will join The Atlantic and Quartz as a contributing editor beginning in September, Atlantic Media announced today in a press release. Zakaria will cover “pressing world matters and culture”, and his work will appear both in the magazine and on TheAtlantic.com, according to Atlantic Media: “As part of this new relationship, he will write for The Atlantic as well as participate in events for both AtlanticLIVE and Quartz, Atlantic Media’s global business news brand. His first outing will be with…
  • Should publishers be taking better advantage of evergreen content in their archives?

    Sam Kirkland
    28 Jul 2014 | 8:16 am
    For most publishers, less than 10 percent of June page views came from traffic to evergreen articles — stories that were more than three days old by Parse.ly’s definition. Among the publishers included in the analytics company’s data: Upworthy, Conde Nast properties, The Atlantic properties, Fox News, The New York Post, Mashable, Slate, Business Insider, The Daily Beast, The Next Web and The New Republic. Nearly half of the publishers see less than 5 percent of their web traffic attributed to content that is more than three days old, according to Parse.ly: Unsurprisingly,…
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    Media Disruptus

  • Predict future news events with web data

    Steve Outing
    15 Jul 2014 | 2:56 pm
    Is it possible to know the future? In general, the answer is a resounding “No!” But in certain instances, tools are emerging to predict what might happen in the near future with high probability. This kind of knowledge — say, that civil unrest and violence is likely to erupt in a specific country within the...
  • Start at the end: How ‘backcasting’ might save investigative journalism

    Steve Outing
    9 Jul 2014 | 9:30 am
    Wouldn’t it be wonderful? If we could envision a desirable future and make it happen. Is that possible? … Well, sort of. I encourage the news/media industries and journalism educators to give it a try. This is the second of my series to demonstrate the many tools and methods of strategic foresight (a.k.a., futures studies),...
  • How to measure the value of news content: How about based on reader action?

    Steve Outing
    26 Jun 2014 | 3:58 pm
    “What is the best way to measure meaningful content?” … That’s the prompt for June’s Carnival of Journalism, a monthly blog-fest where journalism experts and aficionados answer a common question, and the result is a brain dump usually representing lots of diversity and wisdom. Carnival proprietor David Cohn has a rule for participants: “No apologies.”...
  • What if? … The NY Times ended its daily print edition

    Steve Outing
    3 Jun 2014 | 4:09 pm
    Stop the presses! (For 6 days a week!) … Yes, I’m being serious. The recent New York Times “Innovation” report, a meant-to-be-internal strategy document proposing a (long-overdue) digital-first future for what is arguably the best newspaper and digital news operation on the planet, painted a depressing picture. Despite beefing up its digital business and creating...
  • NY Times: Another myopic dinosaur that needs to go digital first?

    Steve Outing
    19 May 2014 | 10:54 pm
    You’ve likely seen the “leaked” New York Times innovation-strategy report produced by an 8-member team of NYT employees, presumably for management and internal consumption. (The unabridged version appeared on the web, initially via Buzzfeed, just as executive editor Jill Abramson was getting fired last week — perhaps not coincidentally. The report is dated March 24,...
 
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    LOCAL ONLINER

  • Zillow to Buy Trulia; Will Pursue Twin Brand Strategy

    Peter
    28 Jul 2014 | 1:18 pm
    Zillow is buying Trulia, its chief rival, for $3.5 Billion in stock. The two companies – both nine years old — mostly overlap today. But after the deal closes in 2015, they will seek to develop differentiated marketplaces for real estate-related information, which includes house sales, rentals, mortgage and related national and local advertising. As the acquiring company, Zillow would focus on top of funnel awareness/discovery advertising/ Trulia. Meanwhile, would focus more on specific agent-related, final purchase (or rental)- related advertising. According to ComScore, Zillow…
  • CBS Local Buys Eventful

    Peter
    24 Jul 2014 | 1:35 pm
    Event listing sites were once seen as a leading hub for local media, and a great generator of user generated content and social media. It isn’t clear that they’ve fully caught on in these ways, but they remain strong promotional assets; sell lots of event tickets; and they also bring in related advertising. CBS Local — the digital arm of CBS Radio — obviously sees their value. Today, it announced it is acquiring Eventful, one of the leading listings sites – and one that has evolved over the years to become a major social media player for local entertainment, and for…
  • Wanderful Media Targets SMB Retailers With ‘Find&Save Storefront’

    Peter
    23 Jul 2014 | 3:43 pm
    When it comes to search, promotion, customer engagement and just getting found, the challenge for smaller retailers is to level the playing field with larger players (i.e. Macy’s, Kohl’s, Sears). That’s the idea behind Wanderful Media‘s new Find&Save Storefront, an App that allows SMB retailers to promote sales goods, seasonal collections and other items. Several hundred retailers have downloaded the App, which is in soft launch in several test markets. A major launch is planned for October. The Storefront is an extension of Wanderful Media’s current mission…
  • LevelUp Banks on Smart Watch Adoption for Payments

    Peter
    22 Jul 2014 | 2:31 pm
    Phone-based digital payments haven’t really taken off – in part, because they aren’t much easier to use than credit/debt cards. You’ve still got to take them out of your pocket. The notable exception is the phenomenon of My Starbucks Rewards loyalty program, which now has 10 million Starbucks customers actively using the mobile app, twice the number of a year ago. But if “wearables” take off – i.e. smart watches and to a lesser extent, glasses – there could be rapid growth. In fact, payments are the most practical smartwatch feature (aside from telling the time.)…
  • Twitter Acquires CardSpring; Enters SMB Loyalty and Data Space

    Peter
    18 Jul 2014 | 12:02 pm
    Twitter has made a bold move to go beyond advertising by adding performance marketing to its portfolio via the purchase of CardSpring, the San Francisco-based startup. The acquisition price has not been announced. CardSpring had raised $10 Million since its launch in 2011. One of the big tech challenges in the payments space has been to remake the credit/debit card to a “digital receipt” product that can not only process sales, but also leverage specific SKU information, location and customer behavior to add coupons, loyalty points, events and other ewallet items. That’s the challenge…
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    thescoop.org

  • Lightning Strikes

    Derek Willis
    7 Jul 2014 | 5:00 pm
    On November 19, 2009, Jaimi Dowdell of Investigative Reporters & Editors sent an email to more than a dozen of us asking about some ideas for advanced sessions for the 2010 CAR conference in Phoenix. Here’s part of my response: I think the ideas are great. A couple of possible suggestions: A session of “lightning talks”, in which people present a single idea or technique in a short time. I think it would lessen the pressure on presenters and expand the universe of them, too. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lightning_Talk Every once in awhile, I have an idea that pans out. Lightning…
  • How It Starts

    Derek Willis
    21 May 2014 | 5:00 pm
    Tomorrow is Aron Pilhofer’s last day at The New York Times. Aron joined The Times in 2005, first working with the computer-assisted reporting desk then headed by Tom Torok. In the summer of 2007, I was working at washingtonpost.com doing things that other newsrooms weren’t doing. And then Aron started talking about this team he would be building at The Times. It was a compelling pitch, even though washingtonpost.com was ahead of the pack. “You should have a blast,” he wrote in one email. Thanks to Aron, it has been one hell of a ride. It’s instructive to look back at the beginnings…
  • Data Journalism, Student Media Edition

    Derek Willis
    8 Oct 2013 | 5:00 pm
    I had the privilege of speaking to students (and some faculty) at Duke University on Monday, and it was inspiring to see so many people come out to listen to a very geeky talk, to say nothing of the speaker. Afterwards, several students came up to ask how they could start doing data journalism at a student newspaper, particularly at a private university not subject to most public records requests. If I’m going to encourage student journalists to embrace data journalism, it’s only right that I try to provide some suggestions on how to do this in a university environment. First suggestion:…
  • The Natives Aren't Restless Enough

    Derek Willis
    30 Sep 2013 | 5:00 pm
    A couple of points to start with, in the hopes of not wasting readers’ time and preparing for some reactions: This post could be named “Get Off My Lawn” or “In My Day, We Earned It!” or some other title that would demonstrate that I am, more than ever, a cranky old guy now. What follows obviously does not apply to everyone younger than I am (42, for the record). But it does apply to a distressingly large percentage of those who I have taught at the university level (undergraduate and graduate) over the past eight years. This post stems from one sentence in a Poynter summary of a…
  • Teaching Hospitals, Journalism Education and a Hatchet Job

    Derek Willis
    21 Aug 2013 | 5:00 pm
    Donica Mensing and David Ryfe from the Reynolds School of Journalism at the University of Nevada, Reno, have published a paper that attempts to argue that recent attempts by foundations and others advocating for a “teaching hospital” approach to journalism education, while well-intentioned, is actually some sort of “back to the future” plan that would enshrine the journalistic norms of the 1960s and (I am not making this up, I swear) “could actually slow the response to change” by journalism schools. Three questions come to mind: First, could anything really slow the response…
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    yelvington.com

  • Traditional American values

    yelvington
    4 Jul 2014 | 8:49 am
    It is the Fourth of July, Independence Day in the United States, a day when we dress up in red/white/blue outfits, eat hot dogs and barbecue, and set off small explosives. It also is a day for pontificating about what it is to be an American. We don't really need a special day for that, as we now are in a state of continuous political campaigning and under a barrage of propaganda from our "deregulated" broadcasting industry. But a comment that I saw the other day about how we need to return to "traditional American values" is stuck in my head, so I am going to do a bit of pontificating of my…
  • The episode in which I cause the sky to fall on journalism as we know it

    yelvington
    18 Apr 2014 | 12:05 pm
    I was part of a panel discussion of metrics and analytics in the newsroom a couple of weeks ago at the Journalism Interactive conference at the University of Maryland. I approached the subject with some trepidation. Some journalists are resistant to the very idea of measurement, often downright innumerate, and sometimes hostile to any idea that doesn't lead us all back into the honey and clover of the 1980s, before the Internet came along and turned it all into snakes and bees. But I was heartened to find that the room was full of people who were clearly very interested in the subject and…
  • Milepost 20

    yelvington
    2 Apr 2014 | 9:53 am
    I passed another milepost yesterday. April 1 was my 20th anniversary in digital media. I moved from the print newsroom of the Star Tribune on April 1, 1994, found a desk in the tech office, and started noodling on a website prototype on a Mac Quadra. The Web in those days was primitive and the Internet in general was barely out from under "acceptable use policies" that forbade commercial activity. There were no authoring tools. Web browsers couldn't even do tables, so layout was out of the question. Within a month or so we made a decision to skip the Web and build on a commercial online…
  • Spotted gets a new framework

    yelvington
    5 Mar 2014 | 12:02 pm
    Back in the last decade we created a community photo-sharing platform called Spotted. The original idea was borrowed from a simple, successful content/marketing program at Cox Interactive Media, where I was executive editor at the turn of the century. We sent someone with a digital camera to an event with instructions to turn around and shoot the spectators, and hand out business cards. The resulting slideshows were huge traffic generators. At Morris, this was merged with the "anyone can post" philosophy of Flickr and eventually implemented as a Morris DigitalWorks tool that became a…
  • Didn't mean to quit blogging

    yelvington
    5 Mar 2014 | 10:41 am
    I didn't mean to quit blogging, but I've been busy at work and living in two cities. And honestly, I've grown tired of the old pointless debates: free or paid? is the Internet the end of journalism or a new beginning? and so forth. Twitter has displaced blogging of the "blurb and link" variety, and Facebook has displaced blogging of the "I just want to express myself" flavor. I think that narrows the purpose of a blog, but it does not eliminate it. Maybe I'll do some more, now that I hacked my way past a forgotten password problem.
 
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    Pew Research Center's Journalism Project

  • Methodology

    Pew Research Center's Journalism Project
    10 Jul 2014 | 6:00 am
    This study, “America’s Shifting Statehouse Press” employed several methods to obtain a census that is as complete as possible of reporters covering the 50 statehouses in the United States.  The main methods consisted of an intake questionnaire, outreach to press secretaries, legislative staff or state government employees and direct contact via email or phone calls […]
  • Coping with Fewer Reporting Resources

    Pew Research Center's Journalism Project
    10 Jul 2014 | 6:00 am
    Media Collaborations at the Statehouse With fewer resources, legacy organizations have had to figure out new and creative ways to cover news out of the statehouse. A number of them have adopted an approach that in the past would have been unusual, if not unheard of—collaborating with the competition. Other outlets are combining resources with […]
  • Bigger States & Longer Sessions Mean More Statehouse Reporters

    Pew Research Center's Journalism Project
    10 Jul 2014 | 6:00 am
    The number of journalists covering the statehouse varies dramatically from state to state, with some capitols filled with dozens of full-time reporters and others playing host to only two or three. What accounts for these differences in staffing? We looked at several factors that could conceivably be connected to the number of reporters assigned to […]
  • America’s Shifting Statehouse Press

    Pew Research Center's Journalism Project
    10 Jul 2014 | 6:00 am
    A new study finds 1,592 journalists reporting from U.S. statehouses where the ranks of newspaper reporters have shrunk, the number of journalists at nontraditional outlets has grown and observers worry about the quality of coverage.
  • Who Covers the Statehouse

    Pew Research Center's Journalism Project
    10 Jul 2014 | 6:00 am
    These 1,592 reporters come from a wide range of outlets and sectors. Even with the declines of the last decade, newspapers still employ the greatest portion of all statehouse reporters—38% of the total. The next largest employer, television stations, account for less than half as many (17%). They are followed by reporters working for a […]
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    News

  • NPPA BOP Awards Show & Education Festival Line-Up Announced

    2094
    21 Jul 2014 | 1:19 pm
    The National Press Photographers Association's "Best Of Photojournalism Awards Show & Education Festival" is growing near and final plans are being made for the August 8-9, 2014, event in West Palm Beach, FL.
  • Cortona, Where Photography Brought A Town Back To Life

    2094
    20 Jul 2014 | 8:10 pm
    Under the bask of the Tuscan sun it only took four years for the Cortona On The Move photography festival to become one of the world's most important, if not the most fun, annual events on the international photography scene.
  • NPPA Joins FAA Filings Supporting Drone Exemptions

    2094
    17 Jul 2014 | 1:01 am
    The National Press Photographers Association has filed comments to the Federal Aviation Administration in support of petitions from a number of aerial photography and video production companies seeking exemptions from FAA rules to commercially operate small unmanned photography drones.
  • Journalism Groups Urge Obama To Stop Excessive Controls On Public Information

    2094
    8 Jul 2014 | 11:08 am
    Thirty-eight journalism and open government groups (including the National Press Photographers Association) today called on President Barack Obama to stop practices in federal agencies that prevent important information from getting to the public.
  • NPPA Launches Three-Part Series On Stock Photography

    2094
    7 Jul 2014 | 9:47 am
    Today the National Press Photographers Association published the first of a three-part series by Janet Smith on Stock Photography.
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    Online Journalism Blog

  • Hyperlocal Voices: Matthew Duffy, Coventry Culture

    Damian Radcliffe
    18 Jul 2014 | 4:20 am
    Not all hyperlocal sites cover everything that’s happening in the patch, some focus on specific subject areas. The latest in our series of Hyperlocal Voices sees Damian Radcliffe look at Coventry Culture. As the site celebrates its first anniversary this month, founder and editor Matthew Duffy tells him about his journey over the past 12 months. 1.  Who were the people behind the blog? The blog is run entirely by myself. 2.  What made you decide to set up the blog? I began Coventry Culture first and for-most as a third year final project for my Journalism degree course. To expand…
  • Four examples of different threat models

    Paul Bradshaw
    16 Jul 2014 | 11:09 pm
    My post on threat models for journalists is quite lengthy, so I thought I’d put the sample threat models from that in their own, separate post. Here they are – note that these are very simple, sketchy threat models and you would want to expand on these. But hopefully they provide a starting point. A basic threat model for anyone with access to a key social media account – or colleagues who do. This is an example of a threat model for anyone who deals with protestors, complainants, or others who might be targets of others When dealing with whistleblowers, leaks, or sources…
  • Why every journalist should have a threat model (with cats)

    Paul Bradshaw
    15 Jul 2014 | 11:23 pm
    If you’re a journalist in the 21st century you have two choices: you can choose to be paranoid, or you can choose to be delusional. The paranoid journalist assumes that someone is out to get them. The delusional journalist assumes that no one is. In this post I will explain why and how every journalist – whether you’re a music reporter or a political correspondent – can take a serious and informed look at their security and arrive at a reasonable evaluation of risks and safeguards. Don’t panic. I promise that by the end of this piece you will be less…
  • SEO recruiters look for journalists as Google gets fussier

    Nick Chowdrey
    10 Jul 2014 | 4:18 am
    Searches for ‘content marketing’ according to Google Trends. Since February the term has been at the peak of its popularity [Tweet this image]In a guest post for OJB, Nick Chowdrey looks at why increasing numbers of SEO agencies are hiring journalists. As online marketing and search engine optimisation (SEO) practices have evolved, journalists have become increasingly sought-after by the agencies that compete to improve their clients’ rankings. “For a long time there was a very poor practice in online marketing,” says Joe Sharp, Head of SEO at Hearst…
  • Over 1000 journalists are now exploring scraping techniques. Incredible.

    Paul Bradshaw
    9 Jul 2014 | 1:56 am
    Last week the number of people who have bought my ebook Scraping for Journalists passed the 1,000 mark. That is, to me, incredible. A thousand journalists interested enough in scraping to buy a book? What happened? When I first began writing the book I imagined there might be perhaps 100 people in the world who would be interested in buying it. It was such a niche subject I didn’t even consider pitching it to my normal publishers. Now it’s so mainstream that the 1000th ‘book’ was actually 12: purchased by a university which wanted multiple copies for its…
 
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    Common Sense Journalism

  • And now a family moment ...

    Doug Fisher
    28 Jul 2014 | 1:31 pm
    Proud of my son Scott as he works toward his doctorate.Publication out today in a U.N. volume:
  • Not to pick a fight, but SCPA leader's FOI commentary misses important context

    Doug Fisher
    17 Jul 2014 | 10:42 pm
    Bill Rogers, head of the S.C. Press Association, has written a forceful and important column on two recent state Supreme Court rulings that have done major damage to freedom of information in the state.Bill is good and valued friend, and I don't want to pick a fight. And I agree forcefully with his frustrations over both these court rulings and trying to get any changes to the FOI Act through the Legislature. But I think the order in which he presents his argument is important when read with the court' ruling.Bill writes:The public also lost a few weeks ago when the high court ruled that…
  • Body blow two to S.C. FOI

    Doug Fisher
    17 Jul 2014 | 12:10 am
    A few weeks ago, it was a ruling by South Carolina's Supreme Court saying that public bodies were not required to post meeting agendas that punched a hole in South Carolina's FOI law.Now it has ruled that autopsy reports are medical records not subject to disclosure. (PDF of ruling.) While I felt the last ruling was defensible because of a poorly worded law, this one is just bad public policy. As reported in the Sumter case in question, the autopsy report the newspaper eventually got elsewhere seemed to contradict the police explanation in a man's shooting.This is one where I think…
  • Journalism Education: If you teach reporting, especially public affairs, you must download this financial guide

    Doug Fisher
    2 Jul 2014 | 6:21 am
    If you teach public affairs reporting -- or are a journalist who has to deal with local government -- you really should download Governing magazine's "A Public Official's Guide to Financial Literacy." Fantastic teaching tool.Plain English.Any guide that gives your students (or you) a fighting chance of understanding GO vs. the types of revenue bonds; or cash, accrual and modified accrual accounting (gotta know that to be able to read the financials) is worth every minute you spend with it (and that won't be many because it's only 34 easy-to-digest pages).(I should warn you, you will be asked…
  • The promise -- and peril -- in Atlanta editor's words

    Doug Fisher
    23 Jun 2014 | 12:08 pm
    The Atlanta Journal-Constitution's managing editor, Bert Roughton Jr., told Poynter last week: I can’t have people stuck on beats that may or may not have audiences all the time.In that simple sentence lies the complicated tale of the current state of the news industry, at once fraught with promise and peril.Roughton said those words in the context of trying to, as he put it, "smartly" manage what has been one of the more decimated staffs, having gone from about 500 people to about 180 in a bit more than a decade.The AJC was one of the first to go "digital first," in 2007 moving its spot…
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    CyberJournalist.net

  • 7 key takeaways from IAB's study on in-feed sponsored content

    28 Jul 2014 | 7:36 am
    Despite demographic and content differences, business and entertainment news users are highly receptive to in-feed sponsored content if it is relevant, authoritative and trustworthy. General news users are the least receptive but also said that they can have a positive experience if the advertising is relevant, authoritative and trustworthy. Well done sponsored content can enhance the credibility of the site and the site’s credibly can enhance the perceived credibility of the in-feed sponsored content (33% lift in perceived credibility of the sponsored content when on credibly…
  • "One of the toughest but most important parts of designing products – deciding what to trim as you..."

    24 Jul 2014 | 9:48 am
    “One of the toughest but most important parts of designing products – deciding what to trim as you move forward.” - —Jon Wiley, Lead Designer on Google Search Why Google Killed Your Favorite Feature
  • mlb: The anatomy of an epic baseball standoff. Great...

    23 Jul 2014 | 6:28 pm
    mlb: The anatomy of an epic baseball standoff. Great storytelling through GIFs!
  • fastcompany: New predictive analytics are making Moneyball look...

    23 Jul 2014 | 6:26 pm
    fastcompany: New predictive analytics are making Moneyball look obsolete. At a workshop during the GigaOm Structure conference, Hensberger shared his next-level data crunching and the academic paper his team prepared for the MIT Sloan Sports Analytics Conference. His team modeled MLB data to show with 74.5% accuracy what a pitcher is going to throw—and when. Read More>
  • emergentfutures: Amazon is testing “Kindle Unlimited,” an ebook...

    20 Jul 2014 | 12:36 am
    emergentfutures: Amazon is testing “Kindle Unlimited,” an ebook subscription service for $9.99/month According to pages that were pulled down, it will offer access to over 600,000 titles. Full Story: Gigaom
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    The Newspaper Guild

  • Former Newsweek Reporter Recalls 4 Months in Iranian Jail

    Janelle
    28 Jul 2014 | 12:04 pm
    Maziar BahariJuly 28, 2014The Washington PostLast week, Washington Post correspondent Jason Rezaian, his wife Yeganeh Salehi and two photojournalists were arrested in Iran. Officials haven’t explained why a dozen armed men raided Rezaian’s home; they haven’t offered up very much information at all. But I have a good sense of what Rezaian and his colleagues may be going through. The same thing happened to me. At Evin (prison), I was at their mercy. I was accused of being a spy for different agencies — the CIA, Mossad, MI6 and Newsweek. They interrogated me, then put me into solitary…
  • Guild Takes Action Against El Diario's Nonunion Hiring Spree

    Janelle
    28 Jul 2014 | 8:26 am
    StaffJuly 28, 2014The Newspaper Guild of New YorkSix weeks after illegally firing eight NY Guild members, the Spanish-language newspaper El Diario has gone on a nonunion hiring spree, leading the Guild to seek a court order to force the paper to reinstate the workers. "At the time of the layoffs, management claimed it was 'forced' to make the cuts due to a 'challenging business environment.' Since then, however, the company has hired at least eight new employees (and possibly more) in nonunion capacities, even though they are doing Guild-represented work, including the work of the employees…
  • 'News of the World' Had Only 1 Rule: Get the Story at Any Cost

    Janelle
    28 Jul 2014 | 8:18 am
    Nick DaviesJuly 28, 2014The GuardianIn 2005, Andy Coulson was the award-winning editor of the News of the World, presiding over a culture of ruthless exploitation. In the second extract from his new book Hack Attack, Nick Davies examines a world where there was only one rule – get the story at any cost. "There was no room for doubt or conscience. Human feelings did not come into it. The News of the World was exposing bad people – all in the public interest. Privacy did not come into it. Privacy was for paedophiles, as the former feature writer, Paul McMullan, used to say. There was no…
  • Poynter Explores Maine Guild Member's 29-Part Series

    Janelle
    28 Jul 2014 | 7:36 am
    Kristen HareJuly 28, 2014Poynter The whole thing started with a question — what was happening with the Passamaquoddy in Maine? Sources had reached out to Colin Woodard, a reporter (and Guild member) with the Portland Press Herald, about rule of law problems on the Passamaquoddy reservation. There was no constitution and no way to hold elected officials accountable. There was corruption. Woodard wanted to know where those problems began. “And I eventually found myself in the early 1960s in a Maine that I did not recognize and one that was shocking and frankly horrifying,” Woodard said.
  • Wichita Reporters Get Rare Access to Koch Brothers

    Janelle
    28 Jul 2014 | 7:23 am
    Deron LeeJuly 28, 2014Columbia Journalism ReviewIf you want to score a sit-down with the Kochs, it helps to work in Wichita. With that access, the Eagle offers a portrayal of the Kochs that’s different than the one you probably know—a counterpoint to the sometimes overheated critical coverage of the Kochs in other outlets. But the articles walk a fine line between discussing the Kochs’ PR objectives and advancing them—and sometimes come down on the wrong side, especially when the story inevitably turns to politics. Given the public interest in the Kochs’ political activity, and…
 
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    Media | The Guardian

  • Melvyn Bragg and John Humphrys in tense standoff on Radio 4

    Hannah Ellis-Petersen
    28 Jul 2014 | 9:29 am
    Broadcasters go head-to-head after Humphrys calls Bragg's use of present tense to describe historical events irritatingThe playful linguistic feud between the broadcasters John Humphrys and Melvyn Bragg peaked on Monday afternoon as the pair attempted to settle a simmering question: should the present tense be used to talk about the past?As Humphrys made clear on Sunday, he is very much in the no corner, having chastised Bragg for using the so-called historic present on his Radio 4 show In Our Time. "It gives a bogus, an entirely bogus, sense of immediacy; it is irritating, it is…
  • Google search changes will push SEO firms and social media marketers closer

    Natasha Clark
    28 Jul 2014 | 9:17 am
    Updated search algorithms for Panda, Penguin and Hummingbird have put the onus on content and social sharingGoogle's Panda, Penguin and Hummingbird search algorithms affect around 90% of online searches, according to Search Engine Watch. These algorithms strip out "bad searches" sites stuffed with keywords, duplicated content and manipulated hyperlinks and rightly so; the onus for higher search rankings has consequently been placed on the quality, originality and relevance of online content.So must our understanding of search engine optimisation (SEO) fundamentally change in light…
  • The Snapchat generation marketers are desperate to reach

    Natalie Waterworth
    28 Jul 2014 | 9:12 am
    From millennials to Generation Z, today's youth are a lucrative but ever moving target for marketers and technologistMillennials (those born between the 1980s and early 1990s) and their younger successors, Generation Z (those born after 2000), are a multi-billion pound market for brands. Their sheer numbers gives them enormous buying power as a generation and marketers are scrambling to get a slice of the pie.In the same way the youth of the 1970s and 1980s broke the rules by smoking behind the bike sheds, the youth of today have the same penchant for evading the watchful eyes of their…
  • ESPN's Stephen A Smith apologises on-air over domestic violence comments

    Martin Pengelly in New York
    28 Jul 2014 | 8:35 am
    Sports analyst Smith offered a new defence of his controversial comments on violence towards women made last weekThe ESPN sports analyst Stephen A Smith on Monday offered a new defence of his controversial comments on violence towards women, which he made last week after the NFL suspended the Baltimore Ravens running back Ray Rice, who did not contest a charge of assaulting the woman who is now his wife, for two games.Appearing at the start of the channel's First Take show, the former sports writer and radio host delivered a two-minute statement to the camera. He said: I ventured beyond the…
  • Archant journalists surprised as chief executive resigns after six years

    Roy Greenslade
    28 Jul 2014 | 8:28 am
    Adrian Jeakings, the chief executive of the regional newspaper publisher, Archant, has resigned.In what many of the company's journalistic staff view as an unexpected turn of events, he is to depart at the end of the month. He is also to step down from the board. Continue reading...
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    OUPblog » Media

  • Veils and the choice of society

    DanP
    13 Jul 2014 | 12:30 am
    By Can Yeginsu and Jessica Elliott On 1 July 2014, the Grand Chamber of the European Court of Human Rights held that France’s ban on wearing full-face veils in public pursued a legitimate aim because it reflected a “choice of society”. Although the Court found that the blanket prohibition amounted to an interference with the religious rights of the minority in France that wore the full-face veil, it was justified because it protected the rights of others to have the option of facial interaction with that minority. The Court accepted that this right of potential facial interaction forms…
  • Mormon women “bloggers”: a long tradition

    AlyssaB
    11 Jul 2014 | 2:30 am
    By Paula Kelly Harline Mormon bloggers have been in the news lately, with a blogger recently being excommunicated from the church. It was Ordain Women founder Kate Kelly’s call-to-action writings, meant to recruit Mormon women to her cause, that recently led to her excommunication from the Mormon Church. If Kelly is an example, Mormon women are no wimps. Because the Church is staffed by lay members, Mormon women routinely run entire Church organizations numbering up to 200 people; they make up one-third of the current missionary population; they believe in education; and they have a long…
  • The #BringBackOurGirls rallying point

    Alice
    7 Jul 2014 | 7:30 am
    By Isaac Terwase Sampson The Boko Haram (BH) terrorist group, responsible for the abduction of over 200 school girls in north-eastern Nigeria, has been Nigeria’s prime security threat since 2009. Although the group has carried out innumerable acts of terror in Nigeria since 2009, its abduction of more than 200 girls at Government Girls Secondary School Chibok, on 14 April 2014, outraged the world and gave it reinforced international currency. The global and Nigerian Muslim community has since distanced itself from Boko Haram’s violent ideology. In the face of current cosmopolitan campaign…
  • Discovering digital libraries

    Alice
    29 Jun 2014 | 5:30 am
    By Ian Anstice English public librarians don’t get out much. Sure, we’re often dealing with the public every open hour or talking with our teams but, well, we normally just don’t meet librarians from neighbouring authorities, let alone from around the country. Most branch staff stay in their own building and may never talk to anyone from another authority other than on the phone arranging for a book for a customer. So, it was a delight for me to be invited by Oxford University Press (OUP) to an afternoon to meet with nineteen other library professionals, ranging from…
  • Political apparatus of rape in India

    JonathanK
    19 Jun 2014 | 7:30 am
    Last week the Guardian reported, “A state minister from Indian prime minister Narendra Modi’s ruling party has described rape as a ‘social crime’, saying ‘sometimes it’s right, sometimes it’s wrong’, in the latest controversial remarks by an Indian politician about rape.”  While horrified by these comments, I remembered that a book from OUP India’s office had recently landed on my desk and the author, Pratiksha Baxi, might be able to shed some light on the issue of rape in India for Westerners.  Below is a post Baxi sent in response to my query following the…
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    Blogposts | The Guardian

  • The Joy of Six: great Commonwealth Games moments

    Russell Jackson
    28 Jul 2014 | 2:46 pm
    Ian Thorpe, Rob de Castella, Kerryn McCann, the Miracle Mile and Ato 'Golden Boldon' show why the Games can still punch their weightThey get a bum rap, the Commonwealth Games. For all the whingeing about awkward colonial throwbacks (fair point, I suppose) and talent-depleted fields in some events (less convincing right now with the likes of Usain Bolt about to tear up the Glasgow athletics track), the Commonwealth Games has produced some genuinely thrilling moments in recent sports history. Also, do we really want lessinternational sport? Really? Be careful what you wish for, sports lovers.
  • Gaza crisis: Netanyahu warns of extended military campaign ahead live

    Tom McCarthy and Raya Jalabi in New York
    28 Jul 2014 | 2:33 pm
    Israeli prime minister omits talk of ceasefireOfficials: at least 10 killed in Gaza camp and hospital attacksNine Israeli soldiers killed, army saysRead the latest blog summary 5.33pm ET We're going to wrap up our live blog coverage for the day. Here's a summary of where things stand: 5.13pm ET From Guardian Witness, our tool where readers can upload comment, photos, video and more, a comment, "We need courageous leaders on both sides": 4.59pm ET Israel vows to continue to act with force as nine children are killed in Gaza - video 4.37pm ET There were 51 rockets and mortar shells…
  • Commonwealth Games 2014: day five as it happened!

    Jacob Steinberg (a heroic 1-6pm stint) and Daniel Harris (the glory 6-10pm stint)
    28 Jul 2014 | 2:14 pm
    Kemar Bailey-Cole of Jamaica and Blessing Okagbare of Nigeria produces brilliant runs to win the men's and women's 100m titles, while England's Adam Gemili grabbed a silver 10.08pm BST Talking of which, I'm now going to do the same - though probably without the same elation. Thanks all for your company - night-night. 10.08pm BST He wishes "all the muslims out there eid mubarak, happy, congratulations, my head's gone", and wanders off. 10.06pm BST Adam Gemili is speechless, metaphorically speaking, and his joy and niceboyness are infectious - well done him. 10.00pm BST Nice of BBC…
  • High time Mercedes allowed their F1 drivers to just get on with racing | Paul Weaver

    Paul Weaver
    28 Jul 2014 | 1:59 pm
    Niki Lauda has suggested that once the F1 constructors championship is secured the team would let Lewis Hamilton and Nico Rosberg off the leash that time has comeMercedes mistake in the Hungarian Grand Prix was not in giving Lewis Hamilton a duff call but in making any call at all.It is difficult to be too critical of a team who have totally dominated the 2014 Formula One season and will continue to do so, winning both the constructors and drivers championships. But another satisfying day for them, in which they took third and fourth places in very difficult circumstances at the Hungaroring,…
  • Lloyds condemned after rigging cost of Bank of England rescue scheme - business live

    Graeme Wearden
    28 Jul 2014 | 12:16 pm
    Lloyds penalised for manipulating the fees paid for liquidity assistance set up to save the bank during the financial crisis.Afternoon summaryBank of England governor: Conduct is highly reprehensible and clearly unlawfulFCA: Lloyds colluded at expense of the taxpaperLloyds trader joked: Every Little Helps....Lloyds fine -- details start here 8.16pm BST We've also learned tonight that Lloyds has suspended seven staff over the conduct that led to today's £218m fines.My colleague Jill Treanor reports:Among those suspended by Lloyds on Monday were three of the four unnamed individuals cited…
 
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    blog maverick

  • AEREO – Everything Old is New Again

    CyberDust ID - Blogmaverick
    19 Jul 2014 | 4:30 pm
    AEREO deserves a lot of credit for their effort.  It was a long and expensive shot to do what they went for.  But they went for it.  And they attempted to pivot after their SCOTUS loss. I was watching with interest, because it is something we had examined 15 years ago at Broadcast.com The technology has obviously gotten better on all sides of the equation, but sometimes a good idea is a good idea. Even if it is hard to make work.  This is from January of 2000. What is fascinating is the alliances and attempts that were being made or considered.   We also did the same kind of work to…
  • The Idiots Guide to High Frequency Trading

    CyberDust ID - Blogmaverick
    3 Apr 2014 | 1:28 pm
    First, let me say what you read here is going to be wrong in several ways.  HFT covers such a wide path of trading that different parties participate or are impacted in different ways. I wanted to put this out there as a starting point . Hopefully the comments will help further educate us all 1.  Electronic trading is part of HFT, but not all electronic trading is high frequency trading. Trading equities and other financial instruments has been around for a long time.  it is Electronic Trading that has lead to far smaller spreads and lower actual trading costs from your broker.  Very…
  • High Frequency Trading, and Proof that the SEC Approach to Insider Trading is Completely Wrong

    CyberDust ID - Blogmaverick
    2 Apr 2014 | 7:05 am
    Got to love Mary Jo White, the Chairwoman of the SEC.  While Michael Lewis’s book Flash Boys was getting all the headlines and was the topic of some of the best television  on CNBC, ever, Ms White used the firestorm to ask for more money for the SEC. Shocking ? The only shock would be if she didn’t use any occasion the SEC was in the public eye to ask for more money. It is unfortunate because there is no greater waste of money than what the SEC spends trying to enforce  insider trading laws. Let me give you some examples of just how poorly the SEC manages our tax dollars when…
  • The Back to the Future Arbitrage of Silicon Valley and what it will take to beat it

    CyberDust ID - Blogmaverick
    19 Mar 2014 | 10:05 am
    I’m not a huge fan of Silicon Valley. It reminds me so much of Hollywood and the movie and TV industry. In Hollywood every one will talk and listen to you about your project.  But while they are standing there, right in front of you, they are not looking at you. They are looking past you to the next project where they can raise/sell more.  Where they can be a bigger star. There is always a bigger fish. Who ever is standing in front of them is hopefully just the bait. Silicon Valley has become the exact same thing these days. No one wants to literally start from scratch in a garage and…
  • My 2 cents on Sports Marketing and what I learned from SMU Basketball this week

    CyberDust ID - Blogmaverick
    23 Feb 2014 | 9:46 am
    I had the pleasure of going to an SMU Basketball game this past week. It wasn’t a huge game from a standings perspective. It wasn’t a big rivalry game.  It wasn’t a game between 2 powerhouse teams. It was an important game as every game is for an up and coming team like SMU.  But there was no one outside the two teams that were really paying attention to the outcome. Bottom line, it was a game on the schedule. It was a game on the schedule for every one but SMU basketball fans.  For SMU basketball fans it was their chance to show off to any and all newcomers who walked…
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    One Man and His Blog

  • And now - a message from the Department of Dirty

    Adam Tinworth
    25 Jul 2014 | 1:28 am
    It's for your protection. You don't want to be dirty, do you?
  • Dumping the newspaper

    Adam Tinworth
    24 Jul 2014 | 3:55 am
    Breaking up with newspapers: I’ve found a platform that fulfills my news-reading needs. My Internet-powered cell phone has replaced you, and it’s time for us to go our separate ways. To be honest, newspaper, I’ve been using my new platform for years now, while I’ve tossed you into the recycle bin nearly every day. And interesting counter-point to David Ho yesterday.
  • news:rewired - Startup culture in a big broadcaster

    Adam Tinworth
    24 Jul 2014 | 3:45 am
    How do you bring start-up thinking to a traditional broadcaster? That's what Stijn Lehaen set out to explain in the closing session of news:rewired yesterday. The Belgian broadcaster was struggling online, at least in comparison to its traditional presence. So it set up a startup-style division called VRT Start-up at the edge of the organisation, headed by Lehaen. They worked with Made by Many to implement the lean startup approach to working. They have user insight sessions every two weeks, where they talk with pairs of friends about what they expect from media. Why friends? Well, the idea…
  • news:rewired: filling your social media toolbox

    Adam Tinworth
    23 Jul 2014 | 8:57 am
    Sarah Marshall, social media editor EMEA, WSJ 9 clever uses of social media tools Tweetdeck - use two columns for the same search term, one for the term, and one for the term, but filtered by retweet. Twitter Collections (was custom timelines) - drag tweets into a custom timeline, to gather them all in one place for later use. Twitter Lists: on Twitter, select Timelines on the left, and then select lists - to find experts in a field Facebook Geolocation (selecting where posts are targeted): works really well if you have a large following in that region already. Posst without images or links…
  • Reddit for Journalists

    Adam Tinworth
    23 Jul 2014 | 7:10 am
    Three speakers at news:rewired talking about use of Reddit in journalism, moderated by Mark Frankel, assistant editor, social news, BBC James Cook, Daily Dot There's two main tasks: Finding new stories Sharing stories How do you get started? Sign up. That allows you to start following what you're really interested in. Reddit is made of communities of interests: subreddits. How do you do Reddit wrong? Don't identify yourself. Reddit is great at identifying who you are - and if you're pretending to be someone else, you'll be busted. Be honest about who you are. Be honest and you'll get good…
 
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    The American Prospect

  • A New Phase In the Marijuana Legalization Debate

    Paul Waldman
    28 Jul 2014 | 6:25 am
    On Sunday, the New York Times editorialized for the first time in favor of a repeal of the federal ban on marijuana, and did so in dramatic fashion, with a statement on the front page of the Sunday Review section and two more pieces going into greater detail. It wasn't particularly surprising, given the generally liberal bent of the Times editorial page and the fact that support for legalization has moved firmly into the mainstream. But it's still important, because the Times remains the most influential news outlet in the country, and they have an unrivaled ability to set the agenda for the…
  • Can Liberalism Survive the Obama Presidency? (Yes, It Can.)

    Paul Waldman
    28 Jul 2014 | 2:24 am
    It isn’t hard to find discontent with Barack Obama on the left, so long as you know where to look. The list of particulars is both specific (National Security Agency spying, drone assassinations, toothless Wall Street reforms, flirtations with a “grand bargain” to reduce entitlements, huge numbers of deportations) and general (not enough fighting spirit). The promise of 2008 was left behind long ago on a trail of compromises and policy reversals. Adolph Reed Jr. wrote a cover story for Harper’s earlier this year excoriating the president and the milquetoasts who still support him,…
  • Today's Conservative Obamacare Baloney Debunked

    Paul Waldman
    25 Jul 2014 | 8:53 am
    AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais, File In this May 12, 2009, file photo Jonathan Gruber, professor of Economics at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, participates in a Capitol Hill hearing on the overhaul of the heath care system in Washington. A supporter of the Affordable Care Act, Gruber says, "It’s so crazy to think that a society that has Social Security and Medicare would not find this (law) constitutional.” If you were perusing the conservative twitter-sphere this morning, you would have witnessed a kind of collective orgasm, as it was discovered that back in 2012, MIT…
  • A Bright Spot In Obama's Foreign Policy: Iran. Yes, Iran

    Matthew Duss
    25 Jul 2014 | 7:04 am
    U.S. State Department Photo U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry disembarks from his plane after traveling from Kabul, Afghanistan, to Vienna, Austria, on July 13, 2014 for allied talks with Iran about its nuclear program. Who would’ve ever thought that the Iranian nuclear program—that’s theIranian nuclear program—would be the bright spot in President Barack Obama’s foreign policy, the place where things were looking up? But that’s the situation we find ourselves in, with talks between Iran and the U.S. and it partners in the p5+1 (the permanent five members of the U.N. Security…
  • How Did the GOP Turn Into Such a Bunch of Clowns?

    Paul Waldman
    24 Jul 2014 | 7:31 pm
    AP Photo/Joe Marquette An American flag is held over the head of House Speaker Newt Gingrich of Ga., during a Capitol Hill performance of the Ringling Brothers and Barnum and Bailey circus, Wednesday, April 5, 1995, in Washington, D.C. The circus played Capitol Hill to mark its 125th anniversary.  For a lot of reasons, the current era will probably be seen as unusually consequential in the history of the two parties, particularly the GOP. For Republicans, it has been a time of ideological hardening and bitter infighting. But one aspect of the Republican dilemma hasn't gotten as much…
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    Nieman Journalism Lab

  • First Look Media changes course on “digital magazines”

    Justin Ellis
    28 Jul 2014 | 11:30 am
    First Look Media is changing up its launch plans and publishing strategy, stepping back from the concept of multiple digital “magazines” in favor of strengthening The Intercept and the forthcoming Matt Taibbi project and trying smaller experiments. As originally planned, First Look was to be home to a “family of digital magazines” that would cover specific topics like politics, sports, and business, among others. The Intercept, launched in February by Glenn Greenwald, Laura Poitras, and Jeremy Scahill, was the blueprint: Gather smart journalists and develop a magazine…
  • In the (appropriate!) shift to mobile, is desktop sometimes being abandoned too quickly?

    Joshua Benton
    28 Jul 2014 | 11:17 am
    that desktop traffic is 'going away' has become this unquestionable assumption. where will it go in corporate offices? all tablet? — Wolfgang Blau (@wblau) July 25, 2014 If you’re the kind of person who reads Nieman Lab, you’re probably already sick of hearing terms like “mobile first” and “mobile majority.” Web traffic, including news traffic, is shifting from desktops and laptops to tablets and smartphones — particularly phones. For years, many news organizations viewed mobile as a weird adjunct of the “real” digital product,…
  • Take these lessons from the rubble of Thunderdome

    Joshua Benton
    28 Jul 2014 | 10:38 am
    RELATED ARTICLEThe newsonomics of Digital First Media’s Thunderdome implosion (and coming sale)April 2, 2014We wrote several times about Digital First Media’s Project Thunderdome in its relatively brief life. (Its shutdown was announced back in April.) Wikipedia defines “Thunderdome” as “a euphemism for a contest where the loser suffers harsh consequences” — in this case, a lot of layoffs. But there were a few interesting ideas behind it. Former boss Jim Brady, now
  • The newsonomics of NPR One and the dream of personalized public radio

    Ken Doctor
    28 Jul 2014 | 7:00 am
    Wouldn’t it be cool if public radio fans could get to all their stuff in one simple app? Stuff from Morning Edition, Fresh Air, Here & Now, All Things Considered — and their local station. It would know what we want to hear even before we know it’s out there, bringing it all to us in real time and no cost. It’s a vision that might complete the transition of turning the phone into a virtual digital radio — and it would work on a tablet, a laptop, and even in certain connected cars. That’s the dream of NPR’s new NPR One app. It’s out of beta in soft…
  • The newsonomics of how and why

    Ken Doctor
    25 Jul 2014 | 8:37 am
    Try this: Make a list with two simple columns. On the left, write Who, What, When, and Where. On the right column, write How and Why. Then, go to any news site — local, national, or global — or even to a print newspaper and see which questions the stories you see answer. At most news sites, the hashmarks will fill up quickly in the left column — slowly, if at all, in the right one. That’s the column for explanatory journalism — the new craze of the past year, but built on ideas as old as good journalism itself. Or call it the Wonk Wars as Capital New York and The Huffington…
 
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    Failure Magazine's Feature Articles

  • United Flight 232

    jzasky@aol.com
    13 Jul 2014 | 4:57 pm
    Twenty-five years ago this month, United Airlines Flight 232—scheduled from Denver to Philadelphia via Chicago—crash-landed at Sioux Gateway Airport in Sioux City, Iowa, killing 112 people. The outcome could have been worse.
  • Gruesome Spectacles

    jzasky@aol.com
    16 Jun 2014 | 5:31 am
    Botched executions are up since 1980, suggesting that technology has failed to make the process more reliable and humane.
  • The Walking Dead

    jzasky@aol.com
    20 Apr 2014 | 4:27 pm
    Before Wimbledon, the Masters, the World Series, and the Super Bowl, there was the Astley Belt Race, a six-day walking match that determined the world’s champion pedestrian.
  • Trapped Under the Sea

    jzasky@aol.com
    8 Apr 2014 | 4:53 pm
    Lessons learned from a little-known construction accident, which threatened the completion of the world’s longest single-entrance tunnel, as well as a decade-long effort to clean up Boston Harbor.
  • Kitty Genovese, 50 Years Later

    jzasky@aol.com
    12 Mar 2014 | 4:53 pm
    In “Kitty Genovese,” author Kevin Cook debunks the myth that “38 respectable, law-abiding citizens in Queens watched a killer stalk and stab a woman in three separate attacks in Kew Gardens.”
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    Common Sense Journalism

  • And now a family moment ...

    28 Jul 2014 | 1:31 pm
    Proud of my son Scott as he works toward his doctorate.Publication out today in a U.N. volume:
  • Not to pick a fight, but SCPA leader's FOI commentary misses important context

    17 Jul 2014 | 10:42 pm
    Bill Rogers, head of the S.C. Press Association, has written a forceful and important column on two recent state Supreme Court rulings that have done major damage to freedom of information in the state.Bill is good and valued friend, and I don't want to pick a fight. And I agree forcefully with his frustrations over both these court rulings and trying to get any changes to the FOI Act through the Legislature. But I think the order in which he presents his argument is important when read with the court' ruling.Bill writes:The public also lost a few weeks ago when the high court ruled that…
  • Body blow two to S.C. FOI

    17 Jul 2014 | 12:10 am
    A few weeks ago, it was a ruling by South Carolina's Supreme Court saying that public bodies were not required to post meeting agendas that punched a hole in South Carolina's FOI law.Now it has ruled that autopsy reports are medical records not subject to disclosure. (PDF of ruling.) While I felt the last ruling was defensible because of a poorly worded law, this one is just bad public policy. As reported in the Sumter case in question, the autopsy report the newspaper eventually got elsewhere seemed to contradict the police explanation in a man's shooting.This is one where I think…
  • Journalism Education: If you teach reporting, especially public affairs, you must download this financial guide

    2 Jul 2014 | 6:21 am
    If you teach public affairs reporting -- or are a journalist who has to deal with local government -- you really should download Governing magazine's "A Public Official's Guide to Financial Literacy." Fantastic teaching tool.Plain English.Any guide that gives your students (or you) a fighting chance of understanding GO vs. the types of revenue bonds; or cash, accrual and modified accrual accounting (gotta know that to be able to read the financials) is worth every minute you spend with it (and that won't be many because it's only 34 easy-to-digest pages).(I should warn you, you will be asked…
  • The promise -- and peril -- in Atlanta editor's words

    23 Jun 2014 | 12:08 pm
    The Atlanta Journal-Constitution's managing editor, Bert Roughton Jr., told Poynter last week: I can’t have people stuck on beats that may or may not have audiences all the time.In that simple sentence lies the complicated tale of the current state of the news industry, at once fraught with promise and peril.Roughton said those words in the context of trying to, as he put it, "smartly" manage what has been one of the more decimated staffs, having gone from about 500 people to about 180 in a bit more than a decade.The AJC was one of the first to go "digital first," in 2007 moving its spot…
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    Poynter. » Mobile Media

  • As mobile ad revenue continues to soar, newspapers still struggle to catch the wave

    Rick Edmonds
    2 Jul 2014 | 10:32 am
    There was a double dose of good news in eMarketer’s mid-year ad forecast released today. Ad spending will grow more than 5 percent in 2014 for the first time in 10 years. And the mobile ad boom shows no sign of plateauing with 83 percent growth over 2013 expected. Digital giants like Facebook and Google continue to dominate the category (together more than 50 percent), while newspapers and magazine struggle to offer competitive ad buys on their mobile products. The Newspaper Association of America’s revenue report for 2013, released in April, found that mobile advertising had…
  • How small screens impact photojournalism — and tips for adapting

    Sam Kirkland
    21 May 2014 | 5:15 am
    On Sunday morning, before I got out of bed, I started reading a story from The New York Times on my phone. I found it via Twitter, naturally, and enjoyed Freda Moon’s account of a journey from Chicago to New Orleans aboard a vintage Pullman sleeper car. But halfway through the story, I realized I had scrolled past thumbnail images without giving them any thought (see screenshot at the right). Each photo — smaller than a postage stamp — failed to grab my attention until I recognized the name of the photographer, an intern at the Chicago Sun-Times when I worked there. That’s…
  • Quantcast: Social drives 34 percent of mobile Web traffic, 17 percent of desktop traffic

    Sam Kirkland
    15 May 2014 | 9:14 am
    Quantcast Nearly 4 in 5 news and entertainment sites are optimized for mobile devices, according to a new report by Web analytics firm Quantcast. And those sites see an average of 33 percent of their overall traffic come from mobile devices, while sites that aren’t mobile-optimized see an average of 28 percent of traffic from mobile. That correlation could have big implications for social media strategy, too, as Quantcast found that social accounted for 34 percent of mobile referrals, twice as much as social accounted for on desktop. It’s further evidence that the mobile Web…
  • News in motion: six ways to be a good mobile editor

    David Ho
    25 Mar 2014 | 5:15 am
    So you want to be a mobile editor? Or maybe you just got the gig. Congratulations! Now what? I’ve heard that question a lot lately from newly minted mobile editors at organizations big and small. It’s not that surprising. Mobile has been the coming future of news and information for a long time, but many news outlets only woke up to its importance in the last year. Why? That’s easy: 50 percent. Last year, many news organizations either hit or approached the 50 percent mark in digital traffic coming from mobile. That opened many eyes. It became very clear that mobile…
  • Bloomberg View: latest mobile-first site to embrace the grid, shun visual hierarchy

    Sam Kirkland
    25 Feb 2014 | 2:41 pm
    Bloomberg View, no longer just an opinion vertical at bloomberg.com, has launched a standalone, image-heavy website, which publisher Tim O’Brien told Capital New York is “a departure for Bloomberg.” But the startling new emphasis on visuals borders on overkill. Here’s how Nieman Lab’s Joshua Benton put it: Today In The Continuing Conquest of The News Web By Uniform Rectangular Images With Text Overlays: http://t.co/b8X5odH4rq — Joshua Benton (@jbenton) February 25, 2014 The Bloomberg View site resembles this month’s NBC News redesign, with story cards…
 
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    Pacific Standard

  • Are Patient Privacy Laws Being Misused to Protect Medical Centers?

    Charles Ornstein
    28 Jul 2014 | 2:00 pm
    In the name of patient privacy, a security guard at a hospital in Springfield, Missouri, threatened a mother with jail for trying to take a photograph of her own son. In the name of patient privacy, a Daytona Beach, Florida, nursing home said it couldn’t cooperate with police investigating allegations of a possible rape against one of its residents. In the name of patient privacy, the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs allegedly threatened or retaliated against employees who were trying to blow the whistle on agency wrongdoing. When the federal Health Insurance Portability and…
  • Does Internet Addiction Excuse the Death of an Infant?

    Kyle Chayka
    28 Jul 2014 | 12:00 pm
    In September 2009, a Seoul man called the police to tell them that his three-month-old baby, a girl named Sarang (“love,” in Korean), had died. When a team arrived at his house, the scene was “terrible,” as one detective later recalled. The baby lay straight on her back, extremely underweight, covered by a heavy blanket. A bottle of spoiled milk stood nearby. Her parents, it later emerged, were spending 12-hour stretches playing an online video game at a nearby Internet cafe, and Sarang slowly starved to death. The case shook South Korea, though the parents only spent a combined total…
  • NASA Could Build Entire Spacecrafts in Space Using 3-D Printers

    John Upton
    28 Jul 2014 | 11:11 am
    NASA has been toying with the idea of 3-D printing since the late 1990s, making it a pioneer of a nascent manufacturing revolution. Later this year, the agency is sponsoring experiments aboard the International Space Station that will attempt to manufacture plastic parts using a small 3-D printer—parts that could eventually be used operationally. Future steps may involve the manufacture of plastic parts with metal additives. But compared with the future of 3-D printing in space, as was recently imagined by a National Research Council committee, manufacturing little plastic bits and…
  • Hell Isn’t for Real

    Katie Heaney
    28 Jul 2014 | 10:00 am
    Last week, reports of an enormous crater (a few hundred feet wide, from appearances) in northern Siberia made international news. Though it’s suspected that the crater has been there for approximately two years, it only recently came to public attention after footage taken by a helicopter flying overhead aired on Siberia’s Zvezda TV. Speculation about the crater’s source began immediately, particularly because Russia’s Emergency Ministries ruled out the likeliest seeming possibility, a meteor strike. Some people (my people) have suggested that the smoothly spherical hole may be…
  • Why Isn’t Obama More Popular?

    Seth Masket
    28 Jul 2014 | 8:00 am
    In one of my excursions this summer, I met a gentleman who asked me an interesting question, but we never really had a chance to discuss the answer. So this post is my chance to try to do that. The question was, roughly: The country seems to be running well and Obama has a solid record of accomplishment. So why isn’t he more popular? It’s a good question with a number of moving parts, which I’ll address in turn. First, let’s dismiss the simple answers: It’s not because of racism or polarization. Obama’s approval ratings have been very stable for most of his…
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    ProPublica: Articles and Investigations

  • Podcast: ‘No Credit? Need Credit?’ It’ll Cost You

    ProPublica
    28 Jul 2014 | 10:08 am
    by Nicole Collins Bronzan It’s a scene that plays out all across the country: a worker with steady income but little credit – say, a young service member – walks into a “discount” store advertising guaranteed credit toward furniture, electronics and jewelry. Everything is advertised in terms of installments, says ProPublica’s Paul Kiel, joining Editor-In-Chief Steve Engelberg in the podcast studio to talk about his latest investigation. So, for example, a bedroom set advertised at USA Discounters for $49 a month seems like a great deal. But then, Kiel says,…
  • USA Discounters Responds to ProPublica Article

    ProPublica
    28 Jul 2014 | 8:54 am
    by Paul Kiel In a press release Sunday, Virginia-based retailer USA Discounters said the company's practices and policies in dealing with military customers were "inaccurately" portrayed in my recent ProPublica article. The release did not identify any errors. The article, which also appeared in the Washington Post, detailed how the company courted service members, guaranteeing them credit on high-priced appliances and electronics, then sued them in Virginia if they fell behind on their payments, regardless of where they made their purchases. If the service members did not show up in court,…
  • The Catholic Church’s Bogus Healer and More in MuckReads Weekly

    ProPublica
    25 Jul 2014 | 1:00 pm
    by Amanda Zamora It all began in Lafayette. When a Louisiana diocese was rocked years ago by a pedophiliac priest, a bishop came in to “heal” the community. The bishop later led the U.S. church’s response to the national scandal. “His background gave the Catholic Church tremendous credibility at a moment of crisis. There was just one problem. The story wasn't true.” — Minnesota Public Radio via @callmeKi That time the U.S. shot down a passenger plane — and tried to cover it up. Iran Air Flight 655 veered into a naval skirmish July…
  • For Lenders, Gaps in Federal Law Make Suing Soldiers Easy

    ProPublica
    25 Jul 2014 | 9:00 am
    by Paul Kiel The law is clear: When far-flung members of the U.S. military are sued in civil court, judges must at least appoint lawyers for them. But that basic layer of protection hasn't provided much help to the hundreds of service members sued in Virginia courts each year by high-cost lender USA Discounters. The state routinely allows plaintiffs like USA Discounters to suggest which lawyers should be appointed. Moreover, the federal Servicemembers Civil Relief Act (SCRA) doesn't detail what those attorneys must do or how much they'll be paid for doing it. Practically speaking, military…
  • Thank You for Your Service: How One Company Sues Soldiers Worldwide

    ProPublica
    25 Jul 2014 | 9:00 am
    by Paul Kiel This article was co-published with The Washington Post. Army Spc. Angel Aguirre needed a washer and dryer. Money was tight, and neither Aguirre, 21, nor his wife had much credit history as they settled into life at Fort Carson in Colorado in 2010. That's when he saw an ad for USA Discounters, guaranteeing loan approval for service members. In military newspapers and magazines, on the radio, and on TV, the Virginia-based company's ads shout, "NO CREDIT? NEED CREDIT? NO PROBLEM!" The store was only a few miles from Fort Carson. "We ended up getting a computer, a TV, a ring, and a…
 
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    Reporting on Health

  • Why summer is the hungriest season for some U.S. kids

    jakane1
    28 Jul 2014 | 11:35 am
    When school ends each year, so do the free and reduced-price meals that most low-income Washington, D.C. families rely upon for basic nutrition. To fill the gap, the city's Dept. of Parks and Recreation manages more than 200 feeding sites throughout the city. The benefits go beyond nutrition.
  • On World Hepatitis Day, an invitation

    kgourlay
    28 Jul 2014 | 9:59 am
    Baby boomers are five times as likely to have chronic hepatitis C as any other age group. That's why the CDC launched a public health campaign to encourage boomers to get screened for the disease. And so, in honor of World Hepatitis Day, I invite — no, I encourage — boomers to get tested.
  • Predictive Prevention: Even old docs can learn new tricks

    William Heisel
    28 Jul 2014 | 4:00 am
    Can doctors learn to use patients’ newly available consumer data to improve care while maintaining a bedside manner that effectively communicates the steps a patient should take to realize a healthier future? It's a delicate challenge.
  • Lawmakers push to consolidate women's health programs

    becca_aa
    25 Jul 2014 | 3:00 pm
    Texas lawmakers are looking for ways to fill the gaps in access to health care for the state’s poorest women, three years after making sharp cuts to the state’s family planning budget and rejecting a federally financed women’s health program in favor of their own.
  • Predictive Prevention: Changing health habits starts face to face

    William Heisel
    25 Jul 2014 | 4:00 am
    Futuristic data-mining experiments could give providers new ways of preventing health problems. But the latest digital tools won't lessen the importance of good old-fashioned face-to-face conversations with one's doctor.
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    SixEstate

  • Social Media Screening: Beware the Pitfalls!

    George Williams
    28 Jul 2014 | 4:00 am
      (Please note that none of this constitutes legal advice. This article is meant to delineate some best practices you can observe, but it is always worthwhile to seek legal counsel to ascertain the particulars of your local laws.) Screening Potential Employees If you’re reading this, chances are that you either already use social media for business or are considering doing so. I often write about social media’s use in the promotional arena, but today we are going to take a look at another important facet of using social media in business: screening new employees. Now it…
  • No One Wants to Hear Your Sales Pitch

    George Williams
    21 Jul 2014 | 4:00 am
    Welcome to 2014, a year when the audience is media-savvy and the pace is faster than Speedy Gonzales’. For anyone with a product or message, the potential reach provided by the Internet is like a dangling carrot. The promise of quickly reaching millions is irresistible, which accounts for the deluge of marketing that comes with every online experience. Ad Saturation Do you use Gmail? Then you see ads every time you check your mail. Do you read blogs? Many of them, from large to small, have ads served into the body of their posts, the sidebar, or both. Pop-ups, banner ads, sponsored…
  • The Future of Brand Journalism

    Katie McCaskey
    18 Jul 2014 | 4:00 am
    The Wall Street Journal dedicated an entire section recently to a fascinating premise: “The Future of Everything.” The special report covered diverse industries and personalities (leading thinkers, innovators and artists shared their visions of where the world is heading). Oh, what a world awaits! For Instance: Tony Fadell, founder of Nest Labs, predicted smart appliances and greater connectivity will mean “our relationship with the home will change. The comforts of home will no longer be tied to specific physical structures, giving way to nomadic living.” (I agree.)…
  • Content is King: Embrace the Monarchy

    George Williams
    14 Jul 2014 | 4:00 am
    Content is king. Content is key. Content is indispensable. We’ve all heard this, although many of us are still a bit fuzzy on what it actually means. Today we are going to take a look at online content and how to produce “the good stuff.” Defining Our Terms Wikipedia defines content marketing as follows: Content marketing is any marketing that involves the creation and sharing of media and publishing content in order to acquire customers. This information can be presented in a variety of formats, including news, video, white papers, e-books, infographics, case studies,…
  • Cockroaches, Email Newsletters, and Brand Journalism

    Katie McCaskey
    10 Jul 2014 | 4:00 am
    Email is a 40-year-old technology that is not going away for very good reasons — it’s the cockroach of the Internet. Ouch! Those memorable words came from Jason Hirschhorn, author of the popular, 7-year-old Media ReDef email newsletter. Hirschhorn was quoted in a recent New York Times opinion piece from media columnist David Carr, “For Email Newsletters, a Death Greatly Exaggerated.” Carr traces the on-again, off-again, it’s-complicated relationship that marketers and audiences have with email. On the plus side of the equation: Email, and specifically emailed…
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    Joe Gullo

  • The Power of Emotional Storytelling

    Joe Gullo
    25 Jul 2014 | 6:31 am
    Emotional storytelling on your blog and social media accounts can very powerful. It could be as simple as telling a personal story, including an emotional picture, video, or song. Emotional stories are the ones that connect with you. We’ve all seen images, read a book, song or watched a movie that had made us stop and reflect. While we may be disconnected physically from these people or characters we can relate to what their going through. Here’s an example using photography as a way of emotional storytelling. In this case, a picture truly tells a 1,000 words. You really…
  • Report: Facebook Has More Than Half of Social Logins

    Joe Gullo
    24 Jul 2014 | 5:48 pm
    According to Gigya, Facebook is the leading source of social logins. The report found overall 55% of people are logging into Facebook, followed by Google+ at 27%. Twitter 5% of social logins, and LinkedIn had 1%. Gigya attributed Facebook’s rise in popularity to changes to the social network: Facebook’s climb in popularity continued as the network made critical changes to Facebook Login to give users more control over their data. While the changes are still in the early phases of rollout (Anonymous Login, for example, remains in closed beta), Facebook’s renewed approach towards…
  • Ways to Grow Your Following on Google Plus

    Joe Gullo
    23 Jul 2014 | 6:24 am
    Google Plus is an excellent social network to grow your brand and network. While Google Plus isn’t as popular as Facebook or other social networks, it does provide excellent opportunities for search engine optimization (SEO), interactivity, and engagement. Google provided these ways to help grow your following on Google Plus. How are you using Google Plus? The post Ways to Grow Your Following on Google Plus appeared first on Joe Gullo.
  • New Facebook Feature Allows You to Save Content

    Joe Gullo
    22 Jul 2014 | 4:20 pm
    A new Facebook feature allows you to save content like links, places movies, TV, and music. Facebook says only you can see the items you save unless you share them with your friends. To view the items you saved, go to the “more” tab on mobile or by clicking the link on the left hand side of Facebook on the web. Users can also get reminders about the items they saved on the site. How it Works Image by: Facebook The post New Facebook Feature Allows You to Save Content appeared first on Joe Gullo.
  • Don’t Use Social Media to Content Market

    Joe Gullo
    22 Jul 2014 | 6:23 am
    It’s the content, not social media that’s important. When comparing the two and developing digital media strategies they’re actually in two different ballparks. Don’t Use Social Media to Content Market Don’t get sucked into using social media as a way to content market. Content marketing is sharing valuable and relevant content to move a consumer to take action – whether to buy a product/service, vote, comment, etc. Social media has a clear and specific purpose – to communicate with others. Social media doesn’t have an impact on consumer…
 
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    JobsJournalism

  • How to win a Journalism Fellowship: Tips & Warnings before applying

    18 Jul 2014 | 4:11 am
    Media Fellowships are the journalism industry's equivalent of rock bands winning big recording contracts with major labels. It is an incentive professional journalists covet; it makes your record of credentials and achievements heavyweight. Two dimensions of engagement define why fellowships are highly valuable:The entire objective of fellowships appeals to engaging an exceptional set of industrially relevant skills. Meaning, only the best skills get to take down a fellowship.Fellowships appeal to accomplishing goals that are otherwise esoteric and specialized, at least in terms of…
  • Apply for the Inclusive Media-UNDP Fellowships for Journalists 2014

    16 Jul 2014 | 4:59 am
    Journalism fellowships for Indian journalists have been scant for a while.  Nevertheless, here is one you can apply for: the Inclusive Media-United Nations Development Program Fellowship award for 2014 for professional journalists in India.The journalism fellowship is run by Center for the Study of Developing Societies (CSDS) in Delhi and often offers high-profile fellowships for media persons.The Inclusive Media platform is prestigious and enjoys high-retention in the media industry. So, I say, go for it. If you are selected for it, the impetus from such a high-profile platform will…
  • Jargon used in Journalism: How we Cheese Argot in Newsrooms (H to S)

    3 Jun 2014 | 5:24 am
    Journalism Jargon H to S or go to previous A to GHappy Talk: The casual banter between news anchors and other people “on air” is happy talk. In India, it is slightly different: we happy talk a lot on salary days, you see.Jingle: Short piece of music played on radio to identify a regular feature, or program Jumpline or ‘Conti’: A line of type at the bottom of an incomplete newspaper or magazine article that directs the reader to another page where the story is continuedKicker: A few words at the beginning of a headline, top of the introduction to a story, or caption to grab the…
  • Jargon used in Journalism: How we Cheese Argot in Newsrooms (T to Z)

    3 Jun 2014 | 5:22 am
    Journalism Jargon T to Z or go to previous H to STalkback: (a) A type of radio program in which the presenter invites listeners to telephone in and speak on air (b) Two-way intercom equipment by which a radio or television presenter or newsreader in a studio can communicate with producers or directors in a control room. Tease, or Bumpers in broadcast: It refers to materials promoting a story which ‘teases’ the reader or listener by hinting at but not revealing the real story. “Meet the journalist who suffered from a phobia for English. Find out why in the next part of this…
  • Jargon used in Journalism: How we Cheese Argot in Newsrooms

    3 Jun 2014 | 5:13 am
    Journalism, a profession that runs on words, wags a tongue of its own: jargon, slang, gobbledygook and fickle vernacular, and other specialist terminologies. They form a unique linguistic system that could fill a library of glossaries – just to numb the layman. Just keep praying that the specialist newsroom terminology never goes to the printer. The often slangy and obfuscated expressions that journalists across the globe use in newsrooms fulfill a singular function: convenience and uniformity in communicating ideas and clarifying complex technical processes without having to…
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