Journalism

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  • Not-so-secret lives on smartphones

    Columbia Journalism Review
    24 Jul 2014 | 1:45 pm
    Call it journalistic phone hacking with consent. On The Secret Life of Students a recent documentary series on the UK’s Channel 4, cameras tracked 12 freshmen through their first four months of college. There was one difference: Every single online interaction they had was tracked too. The students—together with their parents and university—gave full consent to having their phones essentially...
  • No silver bullets

    BuzzMachine
    Jeff Jarvis
    18 Jul 2014 | 11:33 am
    Lewis DVorkin performed a miracle with Forbes … almost. He almost rescued a dying brand, almost helped get it sold to a new owner, and almost rescued the Forbes family and its no-doubt-regretful investor Elevation Partners. I respect Lewis’ inventiveness and innovation. He has done the best he could with the brand he had. But there’s only so much that can be done urgently with old media on the descent. As Steve Forbes himself said announcing the sale of a majority stake in his company to a group of Asian private-equity investors and cataloguing how his business used to be…
  • How Rupert Murdoch Pushed Australia Into A Climate Change Retreat

    Media Matters for America - Latest Items
    24 Jul 2014 | 7:23 am
    Australia last week became "the world's first developed nation to repeal carbon laws that put a price on greenhouse-gas emissions." The country's carbon tax, which has been a passionate political topic there for more almost a decade, was finally instituted in 2012. But after a new conservative prime minister, Tony Abbott, was elected in September 2013, the carbon tax was aggressively targeted and then successfully repealed by Australia's Senate on July 17.  The retreat represents a win for climate deniers in Australia who dismiss the looming dangers of climate change and the science…
  • EMR Streaming in Go

    Open
    By JP ROBINSON
    10 Jul 2014 | 8:38 am
    On our platform teams, we use Amazon’s Elastic MapReduce (EMR) service to help us gather useful metrics from log files. We have processes that capture log files, then compress and push them to Amazon S3 for archiving. This pattern builds up massive amounts of information going back several years and, thanks to EMR, it’s all available to us for data crunching. Initially, we used Python for a lot of the heavy lifting, but over time we came to rely on Go. In the Beginning When we first started using EMR, my team wrote the mapper and reducer scripts in Python. We chose Python because it…
  • Block Chains for News

    The Linchpen
    Greg Linch
    17 Jul 2014 | 10:04 pm
    Anil Dash’s piece on applying an underlying concept of Bitcoin to track digital art has me thinking about the potential applications of  block chains for news. As he writes: What the technology behind Bitcoin enables, in short, is the ability to track online trading of a digital object, without relying on any one central authority, by using the block chain as the ledger of transactions. What if we built a block chain system for news? Recording and verifying facts, data, updates, quotes, people, etc like the Bitcoin protocol tracks transactions in a database that no one owns, but of…
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    Columbia Journalism Review

  • Not-so-secret lives on smartphones

    24 Jul 2014 | 1:45 pm
    Call it journalistic phone hacking with consent. On The Secret Life of Students a recent documentary series on the UK’s Channel 4, cameras tracked 12 freshmen through their first four months of college. There was one difference: Every single online interaction they had was tracked too. The students—together with their parents and university—gave full consent to having their phones essentially...
  • The Boston Globe owned the health policy beat once. Where did that tenacity go?

    24 Jul 2014 | 10:14 am
    As goes Massachusetts; so goes the nation--at least when it comes to healthcare. In 2009 and 2010, in the midst of the debate on Obamacare, I wrote a series of 10 posts examining the Bay State's 2006 law that served as a the blueprint for the Affordable Care Act. It's time for an update. This is the first of an...
  • Bloomberg struggles to break out of the box

    24 Jul 2014 | 4:50 am
    When Justin Smith arrived from The Atlantic to last fall to take over the sprawling media group at Bloomberg LP, the move was greeted by hosannas in the media and journalism circles. Here was the young, digitally savvy executive credited with playing a crucial role in pulling a 156-year-old monthly from the brink of extinction coming to an immensely profitable...
  • A state lawmaker's op-ed appears to be copied from... somewhere

    23 Jul 2014 | 1:17 pm
    CHARLESTON, SC — What does cattle ranching in Wyoming have to do with building homes in South Carolina? More than you’d think, apparently, judging by a recent newspaper op-ed by a Charleston lawmaker and a PR package from a beef lobbying group in Cheyenne. The two pieces use nearly identical language in their opposition to a controversial EPA proposal that would clarify...
  • From the archives: The Times and the Jews

    23 Jul 2014 | 12:00 pm
    Editor's note: The fighting in Gaza has, predictably, reinvigorated the perennial debate over the US media's coverage of the Israel-Palestinian conflict. As the country's most-influential news outlet, The New York Times has always been at the center of that debate--a fact that was reiterated in today's New York Observer, beneath the headline: "Two Weeks of Shallow, Facile Moral Equivalency in...
 
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    BuzzMachine

  • No silver bullets

    Jeff Jarvis
    18 Jul 2014 | 11:33 am
    Lewis DVorkin performed a miracle with Forbes … almost. He almost rescued a dying brand, almost helped get it sold to a new owner, and almost rescued the Forbes family and its no-doubt-regretful investor Elevation Partners. I respect Lewis’ inventiveness and innovation. He has done the best he could with the brand he had. But there’s only so much that can be done urgently with old media on the descent. As Steve Forbes himself said announcing the sale of a majority stake in his company to a group of Asian private-equity investors and cataloguing how his business used to be…
  • Send your comment to the FCC on net neutrality. Here’s mine.

    Jeff Jarvis
    12 Jul 2014 | 11:26 am
    We’ve received about 647k #netneutrality comments so far. Keep your input coming — 1st round of comments wraps up July 15. — Tom Wheeler (@TomWheelerFCC) July 11, 2014 I just filed my comments on net neutrality with the FCC, adding to the 647,000 already there. You should, too. It’s quick. It’s easy. It’s important. It’s democracy. Do it here. And do it by July 15, the deadline. [Note: The deadline was extended to July 18.] Here’s mine: I am Jeff Jarvis, professor and director of the Tow-Knight Center for Entrepreneurial Journalism at the City…
  • Friendly skies

    Jeff Jarvis
    22 Jun 2014 | 3:09 pm
    I was five hours late returning from San Francisco to home yesterday but I was remarkably calm and sanguine about the delay. Why? Because I was well-informed and well-cared-for. And that was the case because this year I joined the secret society of most-frequent travelers and ticket buyers on United: Global Services. We were taxiing out to the runway at SFO for our agonizingly early 6:45 a.m. flight when the pilot said a gauge wasn’t acting properly. Back to the gate we went (and I was amused that my United app showed us arriving before we’d taken off). Much testing and…
  • The German war against the link

    Jeff Jarvis
    20 Jun 2014 | 7:29 am
    German publishers are not just fighting Google. They are fighting the link and thus the essence of the internet. Half the major publishers in Germany have started a process of arbitration — which, no doubt, will lead to suits — to demand that Google pay them for quoting from and thus linking to their content. And now we know how much they think they deserve: 11% of Google’s revenue related to their snippets. From their government filing, they want a cut of “gross sales, including foreign sales” that come “directly and indirectly from making excerpts from…
  • If you teach entrepreneurial journalism….

    Jeff Jarvis
    14 Jun 2014 | 9:35 am
    Here’s the schedule for our July 10 summit of entrepreneurial journalism educators at CUNY’s Tow-Knight Center for same. Good news: We have a *limited* budget to help with travel for those who need it thanks to the Scripps Howard Foundation. If you teach (or plan to teach) entrepreneurial journalism, sign up now.
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    Media Matters for America - Latest Items

  • How Rupert Murdoch Pushed Australia Into A Climate Change Retreat

    24 Jul 2014 | 7:23 am
    Australia last week became "the world's first developed nation to repeal carbon laws that put a price on greenhouse-gas emissions." The country's carbon tax, which has been a passionate political topic there for more almost a decade, was finally instituted in 2012. But after a new conservative prime minister, Tony Abbott, was elected in September 2013, the carbon tax was aggressively targeted and then successfully repealed by Australia's Senate on July 17.  The retreat represents a win for climate deniers in Australia who dismiss the looming dangers of climate change and the science…
  • Food Stamp Program Hits Historic Low For Waste, Fox Attacks It Anyway

    24 Jul 2014 | 2:45 am
    Fox News misleadingly attacked the federal food stamp program for being wasteful and unaccountable despite reports that the program achieved the lowest payment error rate in its history in the most recently available data. Fox New complained about the findings of a report from the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) on quality control in the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP), previously known as food stamps. The USDA report clearly states that the 2012 fiscal year was "another year of excellent performance in payment accuracy" before noting that the most recent payment error…
  • Conservative Site: Homosexuality, Game Of Thrones Are Creating A "Slippery Slope" To Incest

    24 Jul 2014 | 1:47 am
    An article published in WorldNetDaily blames the acceptance of homosexuality for creating a "slippery slope" to the popularization of incest, citing the popular HBO series Game Of Thrones as evidence. In a July 23 post titled "Next Stop On Slippery Slope: Incest," notorious anti-LGBT activist Michael Brown warned that the acceptance of homosexuality had created a "slippery slope" towards "sexual anarchy" and the normalization of incest: Gay activists constantly tell us that there's no such thing as a slippery moral slope and that the acceptance of homosexuality will not…
  • The Worst Part Of Paul Ryan's Poverty Plan Is Based On A Media Myth

    24 Jul 2014 | 12:52 am
    Rep. Paul Ryan's poverty proposal, which would in part punish impoverished Americans for not getting themselves out of poverty on a specific timeline, is based on the conservative myth pushed by right-wing media that blames poverty on individuals' "spirit" and personal life choices. Experts say poverty is the result of systemic inequality and lack of opportunity.Ryan Plan: Social Safety Net Beneficiaries Must Sign "Contracts" Ryan's Poverty Plan: Low-Income Families Will Be Held To "A Contract Outlining Specific And Measurable Benchmarks For Success." The "discussion draft" submitted by Rep.
  • The Summer Of Nonsense: 2014 Features Glut Of Shady Anti-Clinton Books

    23 Jul 2014 | 9:17 am
    Three recent or upcoming books highlight the way an anti-Clinton cottage industry is trying to manipulate media vulnerabilities to smear Hillary and Bill Clinton. This summer will see the publication of Daniel Halper's Clinton Inc.: The Audacious Rebuilding of a Political Machine, Edward Klein's Blood Feud: The Clintons vs. the Obamas, and Ronald Kessler's The First Family Detail: Secret Service Agents Reveal the Hidden Lives of Presidents. Rush Limbaugh discussed all three books one after the other on July 22, commenting, "Do we really want to hand the country over to these people?" While…
 
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    Open

  • EMR Streaming in Go

    By JP ROBINSON
    10 Jul 2014 | 8:38 am
    On our platform teams, we use Amazon’s Elastic MapReduce (EMR) service to help us gather useful metrics from log files. We have processes that capture log files, then compress and push them to Amazon S3 for archiving. This pattern builds up massive amounts of information going back several years and, thanks to EMR, it’s all available to us for data crunching. Initially, we used Python for a lot of the heavy lifting, but over time we came to rely on Go. In the Beginning When we first started using EMR, my team wrote the mapper and reducer scripts in Python. We chose Python because it…
  • Improving Article Accessibility

    By CLINT FISHER
    24 Jun 2014 | 8:38 am
    With the redesign and replatform of NYTimes.com in January, we introduced many new features on our article pages. Unfortunately, for our users with disabilities who rely on assistive technology, the new features hindered usability. Before the article redesign, most of our assistive technology users went to our print preview version, which contained only the article text, to avoid having their screen readers interrupted by content outside of the flow of the article. By removing the print preview feature (the redesign allowed us to leverage the print capabilities of modern browsers to improve…
  • Scoop: A Glimpse Into the NYTimes CMS

    By LUKE VNENCHAK
    17 Jun 2014 | 11:15 am
    You know the importance of technology to the future of journalism has become a widely accepted fact when a prominent editor decides to join a new company because of its content management system. That’s what Ezra Klein told The New York Times about his decision to leave The Washington Post for Vox Media, a digital publisher with a fancy, custom-built CMS. Klein couldn’t quite describe what made the Vox system so special, but the fact that a journalist said he loved, let alone even tolerated, his CMS was all you needed to know that the world has changed. Suddenly, the CMS, an often derided…
  • Unit Testing With Block Captures

    By MOHIT PANDEY
    27 May 2014 | 11:36 am
    We recently added read-only comments to our iPhone and iPad apps. We have started writing features that can be shared across our apps as CocoaPods, and the comments feature was an excellent candidate for a pod. Going forward, all of our iOS apps will be able to use this feature. We have been striving to add as much test coverage as we can to these pods, and the comments pod was no exception. At its core, the pod makes calls to our comments API and parses the responses; then it calls the completion handler that was passed to it and uses NSURLConnection sendAsynchronousRequest to do the actual…
  • Building Blackbeard: A Syndication System Powered By Play, Scala and Akka

    By SUMAN ROY and KRISHNA SUNDARESAN
    13 May 2014 | 7:59 am
    The NYTimes News Service/Syndicate division distributes content to other publications. Our syndication business is growing and, until recently, was managed with a legacy desktop-based CMS, which did not integrate well with our web publishing system. We decided to shift away from this system, and our editors needed a new authoring and syndication tool. This application, which we named Blackbeard, needed a document editor with the ability to track changes and other features like real-time dashboards. Backbone.js (coupled with ice) has served us well in the past and was an easy choice. However,…
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    The Linchpen

  • Block Chains for News

    Greg Linch
    17 Jul 2014 | 10:04 pm
    Anil Dash’s piece on applying an underlying concept of Bitcoin to track digital art has me thinking about the potential applications of  block chains for news. As he writes: What the technology behind Bitcoin enables, in short, is the ability to track online trading of a digital object, without relying on any one central authority, by using the block chain as the ledger of transactions. What if we built a block chain system for news? Recording and verifying facts, data, updates, quotes, people, etc like the Bitcoin protocol tracks transactions in a database that no one owns, but of…
  • Jorge Luis Borges on “the task of art”

    Greg Linch
    20 Apr 2014 | 2:21 pm
    “The task of art is to transform what is continuously happening to us, to transform all these things into symbols, into music, into something that can last in man’s memory. That is our duty. If we don’t fulfill it, we feel unhappy. A writer or any artist has the joyful duty to transform all that into symbols. These symbols could be colors, forms or sounds. For a poet, the symbols are sounds and also words, fables, stories, poetry. The work of a poet never ends. It has nothing to do with working hours. You are continuously receiving things from the external world. These must…
  • Of aquariums and arcades: John Cage and Walter Benjamin

    Greg Linch
    19 Mar 2014 | 10:26 pm
    An interesting remark in the preface to avant-garde composer John Cage’s 1969 book, Notations: A precedent for the absence of information which characterizes this book is the contemporary aquarium (no longer a dark hallway with each species in its own illuminated tank separated from the others and named in Latin): a large glass house with all the fish in it swimming as in an ocean. This aquarium metaphor immediately reminded me of another work: Walter Benjamin‘s Arcades Project. Both represent examples of literary montage — collections where the author’s primary…
  • Seinfeld’s “nothing” and John Cage’s “silence”

    Greg Linch
    11 Mar 2014 | 9:20 pm
    Seinfeld called itself a “show about nothing.” The following video (via Lauren Rabaino) captures this cleverly by compiling moments of “nothing.” As I watched, the stark “nothingess” compressed together in such a literal way reminded me of John Cage‘s concept of “silence.” The experimental composer’s piece 4’33″ is generally referred to as his “silent” piece. But, like Seinfeld, it is — despite its label — not silent at all. For Cage, it’s about the shifting the focus from the performer to…
  • #ONA13 workshop materials: Using WordPress to Structure your Beat

    Greg Linch
    17 Oct 2013 | 11:45 am
    Materials from the structure your beat session that Stephanie Yiu, Connor Jennings and I presented. Examples Politifact http://www.politifact.com/ (using Django for structure) - statements - people (politicians and now pudits) - legislative bills - commercials - states - true/false spectrum of fact checks Technically Philly http://technical.ly/philly/ http://technical.ly/philly/directory/ (uses WordPress) - people - organizations - projects - expertise Homicide Watch http://homicidewatch.org/ (uses Django for structure, WordPress for posts) Kaiser Family Foundation has 30+ Custom Post…
 
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    Mediashift

  • Daily Must Reads, July 24, 2014

    Julie Keck
    24 Jul 2014 | 7:08 am
    1. Survey: Book buyers leaving Amazon because of Hachette dispute (Jeremy Greenfield / Forbes) 2. Twitter’s new user pitch means a new advertising pitch, too (Peter Kafka / Re/code) 3. Reddit Live lets anyone create their own breaking news live blog (Nick Summers / The Next Web) 4. American users spend an average of 40 minutes per day on Facebook (Josh Constine / TechCrunch) 5. The next age of Foursquare begins today (Ellis Hamburger / The Verge)   Get our newsletters delivered straight to your inbox.
  • Journalism & Digital Education Roundup, July 24, 2014

    Julie Keck
    24 Jul 2014 | 7:07 am
    1. MOOCs: My course, your content (Carl Straumsheim / Inside Higher Ed) 2. How one rural district is making the edtech transition (Ned Kirsch / EdSurge) 3. Journalism class and the value of project-based learning (Jim Streisel / Education Week – Teacher) (subscription) 4. “Here’s why I never have to teach anything boring again” (Brian McDermott / Quartz) 5. Opinion: Is the developing world ‘MOOC’d out’? (Hannah Gais / Al Jazeera America)   Get our newsletters delivered straight to your inbox.
  • Digital Book World E-book Bestsellers; Week Ending 7-19-14

    Jeremy Greenfield
    24 Jul 2014 | 3:00 am
    The launch of Kindle Unlimited last week put renewed focus on the Amazon Kindle bestseller list and, therefore, on the Digital Book World E-book Bestseller list. According to Publishers Lunch: But now it seems quite clear observationally that KU “reads” or “checkouts” are counted by Amazon towards the “paid” bestseller list, as if they were real sales — at least on the site’s “hourly” bestseller list. We won’t know how this affects their weekly lists for a little, but anyone compiling bestseller lists based on Amazon data (e.g. USA Today and DBW.com) should consider…
  • More Than Yearbooks or Newspapers: High School Journalism Is About the Process

    Adam Maksl
    24 Jul 2014 | 3:00 am
    Co-authored with Megan Fromm Last week, after spending 30 hours observing a high school journalism classroom, freelance writer and editor  (and PBS MediaShift editorial assistant) Angela Washeck gave a first-person analysis of how today’s students are producing media. Her observations, detailed in “The Journey to Teaching High School Journalism in Texas,” mischaracterize the purpose of high school journalism. Washeck, like many professionals who have critiqued journalism education, begins with the assumption that scholastic journalism’s chief purpose is vocational training for future…
  • Daily Must Reads, July 23, 2014

    Julie Keck
    23 Jul 2014 | 7:28 am
    1. Spending to reach people on mobile devices this year will eclipse radio, print (Steven Perlberg / Wall Street Journal) 2. ‘Right to be forgotten’: Publishers rebel against Google’s hidden results (Paul McNally / Journalism.co.uk) 3. Minus proper archives, news outlets risk losing years of backstories forever (Lene Sillesen / Columbia Journalism Review) 4. Uncovering algorithms: Looking inside the Facebook news feed (J. Nathan Matias / MIT Center for Civic Media) 5. How and why the Financial Times built a digital FT Weekend (Jasper Jackson / The Media Briefing) 6. House…
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    Newspaper Death Watch

  • What if The New York Times Went Weekly?

    Paul Gillin
    6 Jul 2014 | 6:50 am
    Steve Outing The leaked “innovation” report from The New York Times that made the rounds in May recommends that the company take more risks, move more quickly and consider radical steps to reinvent itself. Steve Outing wonders what would happen if the Times abandoned daily print editions, and he’s built an elaborate “what-if?” model to test the idea. Outing’s model doesn’t answer the question, but it does provide a new tool with which to evaluate options. “Most news companies aren’t very good at grokking what’s coming at them or…
  • Across the Globe, Newspaper Industry is Actually Growing

    Paul Gillin
    17 Jun 2014 | 1:31 pm
    Observers of the cratering newspaper industries in the US and Europe may be surprised at this news: Print newspaper circulation around the world actually increased 2% in 2013 compared to 2012. The pocket of strength comes from rapidly maturing economies in Asia and Latin America, where people who a generation ago might have used newspapers mainly for kindling are now finding them to be valuable for the purposes for which they were intended. That’s the highlights from the latest World Press Trends survey, which was released last by the World Association of Newspapers and News Publishers. The…
  • A Graphical View of Newspaper Innovation

    Paul Gillin
    29 May 2014 | 3:33 am
    The Newspaper Association of America (NAA) was in denial during the early years of the industry’s crash, but lately the organization has been doing good work to highlight the new spirit of innovation that is taking hold across its membership. As the numbers in this infographic demonstrate, U.S. newspapers have a lot to be proud of. They reached 145 million unique visitors in January alone and the Washington Post and New York Times each drove more than a quarter-million tweets each week. One of the things we like most about this infographic is the attribution. Go to the page on the NAA…
  • The New York Times Gives Itself a Good Thrashing

    Paul Gillin
    19 May 2014 | 11:02 am
    A speech in The New York Times newsroom after the announcement of the 2009 Pulitzer Prize winners (Photo credit: Wikipedia) We finally got a chance to read through the 96-page “Innovation” report commissioned by the management of The New York Times and leaked last week in the wake of the firing of Executive Editor Jill Abramson on Tuesday. Joshua Benton at Nieman Journalism Lab has already called the report “one of the most remarkable documents” he’s seen in his tenure, and detailed coverage has appeared on BuzzFeed, Mashable and numerous other outlets. We won’t go into detail…
  • Why Page Views Suck

    Paul Gillin
    7 May 2014 | 12:25 pm
    Are page views your primary measure of success for your website or a story thereupon? Well cut it out. Page views are about as relevant an indicator of content value as the height of the starting center is a predictor of the success of a basketball team. The issue of what online publishers should measure was the topic of a panel at the International Journalism Festival in Perugia last week. Experts debated whether page views have any value at all. We think they don’t. In fact, we think they have negative value. “Provocative headlines and images encourage people to click but it does not…
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    JackLail.com

  • Good reads on the large life of John Seigenthaler

    Jack Lail
    12 Jul 2014 | 5:56 pm
    (Journalists John Quinn and John Seigenthaler chatting at the First Amendment Center in Nashville, Tennessee, in 2010.) Some good pieces on the large life of John Seigenthaler New York Times: John Seigenthaler, Editor and Aide to Politicians, Dies at 86 Ken Paulson (in USA Today): Seigenthaler a champion of First Amendment The Tennessean: John Seigenthaler, longtime Tennessean editor, dies at 86 NPR: Newspaper Editor, Activist John Seigenthaler Dies At 86 Poynter: John Seigenthaler was a leader of free speech, civil rights and journalism Nashville Scene: Remembering the late John…
  • Reaction to the death of John Seigenthaler

    Jack Lail
    11 Jul 2014 | 7:05 pm
    [View the story "Reaction to John Seigenthaler's death" on Storify]
  • Another year, another year older

    Jack Lail
    16 May 2014 | 12:50 pm
    Researcher Greg Harmon of Borrell Associates says the average age of a print newspaper reader is 57 and the average newspaper web visitor is 51.  Saying the industry's aging demographics ought to have "everyone's hair on fire," Harmon notes that newspaper readers have been getting a year older every year for more than a decade.  -- Alan D. Mutter
  • The weight of establishment and tradition

    Jack Lail
    7 May 2014 | 5:28 am
    A great piece from Om Malik on media. There's lot of food for thought in this piece. Among his highlights: No one could've predicted FB and Twitter as the boosters for media and this is why we've seen so much change and new models. The problem with media is that it's trying to find a answer within itself and not looking at what readers want. The internet as we know it is at an end. The Chinese and Brazilian internets are developing in their own way and pace. Putting a paywall on a thing people were getting for free is a backward move. You must create a new, compelling, useful experience. My…
  • The cheerleader, The Dirty and the court case that could change the Internet forever

    Jack Lail
    1 May 2014 | 1:48 pm
    The fate of a law that was passed in the infancy of the commercial Internet and which created the legal underpinnings for everything from anonymous comments by trolls on news stories to your pet photo on Facebook was argued today in the U.S. Sixth Circuit Court of Appeals in Cincinnati. The case involves a defamation lawsuit by a former Cincinnati Benglas cheerleader against a gossip website.  The cheerleader, Sarah Jones, sued gossip site The Dirty in 2012 claiming allegations on its site about her sex life were untrue. A Federal jury awarded Jones $338,000. In the appeal heard today, The…
 
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    Journerdism | Will Sullivan's Stompin' ground for journalists and nerds.

  • Building the Radio Sawa mobile app to reach youth in closed, censored Middle East markets

    Will Sullivan
    29 Jun 2014 | 3:15 pm
    Today we’re starting the promotional campaign for a new Android and IOS apps for Radio Sawa, one of our broadcast networks focused on music and pop-culture in the Middle East and North Africa (MENA) region. It’s quite a unique experience and while building the product our technology, design and editorial teams were very focused on making a rich, mobile-first experience by doing less things better (rather than trying to throw everything and the kitchen sink in). The core product development and user experience values we focused on to achieve this were: Streaming radio on…
  • Thanks to my team for creating excellence, despite facing of absurd impossibilities.

    Will Sullivan
    29 Jun 2014 | 11:56 am
    Throughout my career working as a catalyst and digital change agent at legacy organizations, I’ve faced a lot of adversity, sometimes pure absurdity…  At one gig, I had to battle with the IT department for more than three months to get them to unblock search engines from crawling our sites. (I eventually won them over and we saw a 37 percent increase in traffic soon after the change.) At another job, when data journalism was exploding and becoming a fantastic new opportunity for more interactive, digital journalism and I ended up having many challenging discussions with the top…
  • Web push notifications coming to a web browser near you (and now live on Journerdism.com)

    Will Sullivan
    15 Jun 2014 | 11:19 am
    Web push notifications fall far on the left side of this curve currently, but will soon swing to the middle. If you’re using the Safari web browser on Apple OSX Mavericks, you may have noticed something new on the site recently — a pop up notification about getting web browser push notifications for new entries on Journerdism. (If you’ve opted in and have any feedback, I’d love to hear it). If you’re unfamiliar with web browser push notifications, here’s a quick video breakdown from the RJI Futures Lab that talks about them and how the NY Times and Roost…
  • Reaching mobile-only audiences and giving voice to the voiceless

    Will Sullivan
    15 Jun 2014 | 10:06 am
    Meta note: Over the past 2-3 years I’ve made a conscious effort to optimize and focus my time on social media, partially from recommendations in The Information Diet partially from just trying to find a better life balance. There was a time in the aughts when I was combing through thousands of RSS feeds and blogging until all hours of the night. That was good for a time to read and process everything possible about the evolution of digital journalism, but in my older age I’ve found I’d prefer to do the work, rather than talk about the work. Especially in recent years,…
  • Happy World Press Freedom Day

    Will Sullivan
    3 May 2014 | 5:29 pm
    I’m so thankful for having won the birth lottery, growing up in a country that believes in democracy and a free press, but there’s still a lot of work to be done for the rest of the world. Every day I’m trying to do my part.
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    sans serif

  • India’s first woman journalist Vidya Munshi, RIP

    churumuri
    9 Jul 2014 | 4:59 am
    sans serif records the demise of Vidya Munshi, arguably India’s first woman journalist, in Calcutta on Monday, 7 July 2014.  She was 94 years old. Born in Bombay, she worked in several newspapers and magazines, including a ten-year stint with Russy Karanjia‘s Blitz. A 2006 profile of Ms Munshi in The Telegraph, Calcutta, noted: “At that time (1952-62), she was the Calcutta correspondent of Blitz, a Bombay weekly critical of government policies and excelling in investigative journalism. “One of her ‘scoops’ was on two Canadian pilots who were to fly from Hong Kong…
  • In ‘The Last Mag’, Nishant Patel is Fareed Zakaria

    churumuri
    2 Jul 2014 | 4:45 am
    DILIP CHAWARE writes from New Jersey: The Last Magazine is Michael Hastings’s novel which has been published a year after his death. This controversial young journalist, who worked for Newsweek as a war correspondent, died last year in a car accident in Los Angeles when he was just 33. Very few were aware about this book, which was resurrected from his laptop. The novel, though, is a portrayal of real life within a major news organisation, the nexus between the government and the media and broadly discusses the relevance and future of the print medium. Hastings is back in the news owing to…
  • A rash I&B ministry “advisory” to TV, print media

    churumuri
    26 Jun 2014 | 4:05 am
    When he was health minister in the UPA’s first term, Anbumani Ramadoss made it mandatory for movies and TV channels to show the statutory warning against smoking and drinking each time someone on screen lit a cigarette or sipped a drink. The Telegraph reports that the NDA’s information and broadcasting ministry under Prakash Javadekar has shot off an “advisory” to TV stations and newspapers “against portraying or “glorifying” rash or dangerous driving, as well as helmet-less riding and a failure to fasten car seatbelts.” “All TV channels/ Doordarshan/…
  • Newspaper delivery boy reads papers, enters IIT

    churumuri
    25 Jun 2014 | 7:30 am
    Last year, N. Shiva Kumar, a newspaper vendor in Bangalore—the son of an illiterate mother and a truck driver—cracked CAT 2012 and went to the Indian institute of management, Calcutta, as a student. This year, C. Prashanth, a construction labourer’s son in Mysore, who delivered The Times of India (surely, among other papers) has obtained the 255th rank in the scheduled tribe category. “Prashanth said he couldn’t afford to buy a newspaper but while selling them, he managed to read them and that helped him gain knowledge crack the prestigious exam,” TOI quoted him as…
  • The hottest reporters covering the World Cup*

    churumuri
    19 Jun 2014 | 3:38 am
    The Times of India fills a vital blank in the public discourse: the hottest reporters covering the football World Cup in Brazil— Ines Sainz and Vanessa Huppenkothen. * Search engine optimisation techniques shamelessly at work Raveen Tandon as Shobha De: Glamourous, sexy, brainy, seductive Look, who wants to play Christiane Amanpour: Kareena Kapoor Will the underworld a hot reporter like Gul Panag? Anju Mahendroo plays queen bee of film journalism, Devyani Sheethal Shetty: Anchoring news easier than actingFiled under: A bit of fun, Newspapers, People Tagged: Churumuri, Ines Sainz, Sans…
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    JackLail.com

  • Good reads on the large life of John Seigenthaler

    Jack Lail
    12 Jul 2014 | 5:56 pm
    (Journalists John Quinn and John Seigenthaler chatting at the First Amendment Center in Nashville, Tennessee, in 2010.) Some good pieces on the large life of John Seigenthaler New York Times: John Seigenthaler, Editor and Aide to Politicians, Dies at 86 Ken Paulson (in USA Today): Seigenthaler a champion of First Amendment The Tennessean: John Seigenthaler, longtime Tennessean editor, dies at 86 NPR: Newspaper Editor, Activist John Seigenthaler Dies At 86 Poynter: John Seigenthaler was a leader of free speech, civil rights and journalism Nashville Scene: Remembering the late John…
  • Reaction to the death of John Seigenthaler

    Jack Lail
    11 Jul 2014 | 7:05 pm
    [View the story "Reaction to John Seigenthaler's death" on Storify]
  • Another year, another year older

    Jack Lail
    16 May 2014 | 12:50 pm
    Researcher Greg Harmon of Borrell Associates says the average age of a print newspaper reader is 57 and the average newspaper web visitor is 51.  Saying the industry's aging demographics ought to have "everyone's hair on fire," Harmon notes that newspaper readers have been getting a year older every year for more than a decade.  -- Alan D. Mutter
  • The weight of establishment and tradition

    Jack Lail
    7 May 2014 | 5:28 am
    A great piece from Om Malik on media. There's lot of food for thought in this piece. Among his highlights: No one could've predicted FB and Twitter as the boosters for media and this is why we've seen so much change and new models. The problem with media is that it's trying to find a answer within itself and not looking at what readers want. The internet as we know it is at an end. The Chinese and Brazilian internets are developing in their own way and pace. Putting a paywall on a thing people were getting for free is a backward move. You must create a new, compelling, useful experience. My…
  • The cheerleader, The Dirty and the court case that could change the Internet forever

    Jack Lail
    1 May 2014 | 1:48 pm
    The fate of a law that was passed in the infancy of the commercial Internet and which created the legal underpinnings for everything from anonymous comments by trolls on news stories to your pet photo on Facebook was argued today in the U.S. Sixth Circuit Court of Appeals in Cincinnati. The case involves a defamation lawsuit by a former Cincinnati Benglas cheerleader against a gossip website.  The cheerleader, Sarah Jones, sued gossip site The Dirty in 2012 claiming allegations on its site about her sex life were untrue. A Federal jury awarded Jones $338,000. In the appeal heard today, The…
 
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    Technology

  • It's Facebook, not the Big Brother state, that worries us

    Jamie Bartlett
    23 Jul 2014 | 9:40 am
    For all the worries about Big Brother snaffling our personal data, it turns out that we are more worried by Little Brother – and starting to change our behaviour as a result. A brand new poll of over 2,000 Brits released yesterday by Ipsos-Mori and the Royal Statistical Society has found that British citizens trust [...]
  • Why do all government IT projects seem to fail?

    Willard Foxton
    22 Jul 2014 | 6:56 am
    While I was phoning around this morning for an explanation to why the Government’s latest big IT project has ended with £350 million being flushed down the lavatory, one respected contractor told me: “I just don’t think the UK government should be allowed to buy IT at all. Maybe give them abacuses, but they could [...]
  • 'Right to be forgotten' is having the opposite effect

    Jamie Bartlett
    17 Jul 2014 | 2:52 am
    Following a ruling earlier last month EU citizens have the "right to be forgotten". Well, sort of: Internet search engines are obliged to remove “inadequate”, “irrelevant” or “no longer relevant” information about you from their search results. Most importantly this means Google, which accounts for around 90 per cent of all online searches. You can [...]
  • Forget Silicon Valley: if you want to know what it's like in a start-up, watch Ghostbusters

    Willard Foxton
    16 Jul 2014 | 8:48 am
    Silicon Valley is an HBO show about the ups and downs of working at a start-up – it starts this week on Sky. It does a great job of satirising the culture of Southern California, but it really only captures the experience of a handful of founders – the proverbial Zuckerbergs, kids in T-shirts who [...]
  • Wikiwashing: how paid professionals are using Wikipedia as a PR tool

    Jamie Bartlett
    11 Jul 2014 | 4:42 am
    How I long to have a Wikipedia entry to call my own! It would be a sign I’d arrived, that I’d made it. It would surely help my career no end. And even though I know myself better than anyone, it is unlikely I could write my own as I'd find it impossible to adhere [...]
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    Idea Lab

  • What Works Where? ZoningCheck Makes Zoning Data More Open

    Peter Koht
    24 Jul 2014 | 3:00 am
    A blueprint for a community’s future, the zoning code is incredibly powerful. It will affect where people live, where they work, and how they get in between those two places. When zoning codes are revised, cities have to make huge decisions. Internal borders get redrawn, issues of setback and walkability are discussed. There is a lot of debate about parking and public transit. To most citizens, zoning rules are invisible. But to entrepreneurs, they matter. A lot of money is at stake. A poor choice of location early on can result in lots of red tape, extra fees and lost time. The trouble is,…
  • OpenNews: Why Code for a Newsroom Instead of a Startup?

    Dan Sinker
    22 Jul 2014 | 3:00 am
    In less than a month, on August 16, the search for our 2015 Knight-Mozilla Fellows will come to a close. Knight-Mozilla Fellows do amazing work — they spend 10 months embedded in newsrooms writing code to help solve journalistic problems — but they don’t do that work alone. When you become a Knight-Mozilla Fellow, you join two communities: a community of fellows (both your peers and alumni from the program), and a community of developers working in the newsroom. To mark this final month of our 2015 Fellowship search, we’ve invited many voices to talk about their experiences…
  • Knight Prototype Fund: When Storytelling Meets Civic Action

    Desiree Everts
    17 Jul 2014 | 6:00 am
    Sixteen winners of the Knight Prototype Fund are set to receive $35,000 to help bring their ideas even closer to fruition. The Knight Foundation on Wednesday announced the most recent winners of its fund, which looks to support early-stage media ideas in an effort to push them closer to a formal launch. Several of the projects in this round include tools for journalists and publishers to encourage news development, storytelling, and community engagement. DIY StoryCorps, for instance, is a mobile app that lets anyone create do-it-yourself interviews to record people’s stories. Global…
  • How Data Journalism Can Become a Revenue Supplement for News Organizations

    Jake Batsell
    16 Jul 2014 | 3:00 am
    The byproducts of journalism rarely have value to anyone besides the reporters who gather and assemble the information. (Exhibit A: The troves of spiral notebooks, manila folders and microcassettes left over from my newspaper days, still gathering dust in my garage.) But more news organizations are discovering that cleaned-up, searchable databases have extra value beyond their journalistic utility — and, better yet, can generate revenue to support even more public-interest reporting. In February, ProPublica unveiled its Data Store, offering both free and premium data sets to journalists,…
  • Want to Come Up With a Good Startup Idea? Throw Away a Bunch of Bad Ones

    Zhai Yun Tan
    15 Jul 2014 | 3:00 am
    The startup process is a dramatic roller coaster ride. It’s thrilling when you discover new gold mines, but crushing when you realize that your ideas are not that novel. My team had to go through the ride four times. Looking back, the biggest lesson I learned in the past six months is having the courage to admit the fallibility of an idea, letting it go, and moving on to the next idea. But before letting go of an idea, you must have at least put up a fight and explored all the possibilities available. That’s how we went through four ideas in six months. In the beginning of January, my…
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    Reflections of a Newsosaur

  • Robots could do better than some journalists

    Newsosaur
    22 Jul 2014 | 3:17 pm
    When the Associated Press announced plans to use computers to write corporate earnings stories, a number of journalists asked me if I was as horrified by the prospect as they were.  In fact, I think robots could do better than some reporters. With all respect and affection for my fellow journalists, I have concluded that a well-programmed set of algorithms can be far more analytic and
  • The newspaper crisis, by the numbers

    Newsosaur
    16 Jul 2014 | 5:00 am
    Roughly a decade after the commercial debut of the Internet, America’s newspapers posted record high advertising sales of $49.4 billion in 2005, leading many publishers to think their businesses would not be seriously affected by the digital revolution. But they were wrong.   Since hitting that high note in 2005, the industry has undergone a dramatic and traumatic contraction, losing nearly
  • Newspapers can’t merely dabble at digital

    Newsosaur
    10 Jul 2014 | 5:00 am
    The New York Times wrote the story in 1853 about how Solomon Northup was kidnapped and sold into slavery, but Gawker got most of the page views by publicizing the archived article when “12 Years a Slave” won the Oscar for best picture in 2014.  This example of how the Times fails to capitalize on its rich content to build digital readership, relevance and revenues came to light in the leak
  • An intriguing ‘publishing platform for readers’

    Newsosaur
    23 Jun 2014 | 5:00 am
    An unprecedented collaboration between two leading newspapers and the non-profit Mozilla tech community aims to build a “publishing platform for readers” that could go a long way toward revolutionizing the way we get and give news.   Inasmuch as the undertaking was announced only last week by the New York Times, the Washington Post, Mozilla and the Knight Foundation, there’s no way of knowing
  • Digital publishing metrics: What’s real?

    Newsosaur
    11 Jun 2014 | 5:00 am
    The ecstasy of digital publishing is that it enables the granular measurement of everything from traffic to ad clicks. The agony is trying to figure out which metrics matter. That’s the vexing issue we’re going to tackle today, but, first, let’s get real:   There are more questions than answers and more opinions than facts. Given ongoing advances in technology and analytics, best practices for
 
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    20 headlines from the reading list

  • "One of the toughest but most important parts of designing products – deciding what to trim as you..."

    24 Jul 2014 | 9:48 am
    “One of the toughest but most important parts of designing products – deciding what to trim as you move forward.” - —Jon Wiley, Lead Designer on Google Search Why Google Killed Your Favorite Feature
  • Reddit Launches Live Blogging Platform

    24 Jul 2014 | 7:53 am
    Reddit has officially launched RedditLive, a new feature where anyone on the platform can create their own live blog via a subreddit. The feature has been in beta for a few months but now anyone can get at it and live blog at will. Are we still in a place where this means journos will whine about professionalism, ethics, and recall the mob mentality surrounding some reddit threads and news events? Probably. If so, it’s probably time to shed the pretense. Reporting needs to be mobile, live, and transparent. RedditLive doesn’t have to be a publisher, though that’s technically…
  • Brasil 14

    24 Jul 2014 | 6:41 am
    Colorful Brasil.via Neil Stevens
  • Code School is Hiring | Junior Designer

    24 Jul 2014 | 6:33 am
    Lovely illustration to hire a Junior Designer at Code School.via Justin Mezzell
  • Sunshine trail

    24 Jul 2014 | 6:26 am
    What a lovely trail to ride.via scotch & jazz @ dusk
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    Poynter. » MediaWire

  • BuzzFeed changes posts that swiped text

    Andrew Beaujon
    24 Jul 2014 | 1:11 pm
    Gawker | Our Bad Media BuzzFeed has updated and attached corrections to three articles by Benny Johnson that swiped passages from other sources, J.K. Trotter reports in Gawker. The notes (1, 2, 3) were added Thursday afternoon. Two Twitter users with the names @blippoblappo and @crushingbort outlined examples of Johnson lifting text, in one case from a press release from U.S. Rep. Sam Johnson. BuzzFeed Editor-in-Chief Ben Smith told Trotter BuzzFeed was “grateful to @blippoblappo and @crushingbort” for alerting it to the lifted text and said Johnson, the publication’s viral…
  • Washington Post reporter among 4 journalists detained in Iran

    Kristen Hare
    24 Jul 2014 | 11:40 am
    Washington Post The Washington Post’s Ernesto Londoño reported Thursday that correspondent Jason Rezaian was detained in Iran on Tuesday along with his wife and two other Americans. “We are deeply troubled by this news and are concerned for the welfare of Jason, Yeganeh and two others said to have been detained with them,” (foreign editor Douglas) Jehl said in a statement. Rezaian is the Tehran correspondent for the paper. He hasn’t tweeted since July 21. Londoño reported that Rezaian’s wife is also a journalist. She hasn’t tweeted since July 20. Rezaian, 38,…
  • Quote approval isn’t necessary when White House insists on interview minders

    Andrew Beaujon
    24 Jul 2014 | 10:02 am
    The Washington Post | Politico | National Journal The White House “may be the most diligent user of the chaperoned interview,” Paul Farhi writes in The Washington Post. Though many news organizations banned the practice of quote approval in 2012, the Obama administration makes diligent use of minders during interviews, which can accomplish a similar purpose. “Let’s put it this way,” New York Times reporter Peter Baker told Farhi about the practice. “It’s not intended to increase candor.” That’s assuming reporters can get near administration officials…
  • Verge EIC Joshua Topolsky will join Bloomberg

    Andrew Beaujon
    24 Jul 2014 | 7:43 am
    The New York Times | The Verge | CJR Joshua Topolsky will join Bloomberg “as the editor of a series of new online ventures it is launching as part of a revamped journalism strategy,” Ravi Somaiya reports in The New York Times. Topolsky co-founded The Verge in 2011. Verge co-founder Nilay Patel left the publication in March to become acting managing editor of Vox.com, which, like The Verge, is published by Vox Media. Patel will become The Verge’s new top editor. Dieter Bohn will be its executive editor. “This is going to be rad,” Patel writes. Topolsky’s…
  • NYT’s use of ‘illegal immigrant’ fell in 2013

    Sam Kirkland
    24 Jul 2014 | 7:18 am
    The New York Times has opened Alexis Lloyd’s Chronicle tool to the public. Chronicle elegantly visualizes how often words and terms have appeared in the Times since 1851. We're opening up NY Times Chronicle to the world. Go explore and tweet us your best finds @nytlabs! http://t.co/GPZITW7Mfl — Alexis Lloyd (@alexislloyd) July 23, 2014 As an example, here’s how Lincoln, Roosevelt and Clinton came in and out of the news over the last 160+ years: The tool is also handy for tracking language and style changes over time. Here’s a graph of the terms “illegal…
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    Media Disruptus

  • Predict future news events with web data

    Steve Outing
    15 Jul 2014 | 2:56 pm
    Is it possible to know the future? In general, the answer is a resounding “No!” But in certain instances, tools are emerging to predict what might happen in the near future with high probability. This kind of knowledge — say, that civil unrest and violence is likely to erupt in a specific country within the...
  • Start at the end: How ‘backcasting’ might save investigative journalism

    Steve Outing
    9 Jul 2014 | 9:30 am
    Wouldn’t it be wonderful? If we could envision a desirable future and make it happen. Is that possible? … Well, sort of. I encourage the news/media industries and journalism educators to give it a try. This is the second of my series to demonstrate the many tools and methods of strategic foresight (a.k.a., futures studies),...
  • How to measure the value of news content: How about based on reader action?

    Steve Outing
    26 Jun 2014 | 3:58 pm
    “What is the best way to measure meaningful content?” … That’s the prompt for June’s Carnival of Journalism, a monthly blog-fest where journalism experts and aficionados answer a common question, and the result is a brain dump usually representing lots of diversity and wisdom. Carnival proprietor David Cohn has a rule for participants: “No apologies.”...
  • What if? … The NY Times ended its daily print edition

    Steve Outing
    3 Jun 2014 | 4:09 pm
    Stop the presses! (For 6 days a week!) … Yes, I’m being serious. The recent New York Times “Innovation” report, a meant-to-be-internal strategy document proposing a (long-overdue) digital-first future for what is arguably the best newspaper and digital news operation on the planet, painted a depressing picture. Despite beefing up its digital business and creating...
  • NY Times: Another myopic dinosaur that needs to go digital first?

    Steve Outing
    19 May 2014 | 10:54 pm
    You’ve likely seen the “leaked” New York Times innovation-strategy report produced by an 8-member team of NYT employees, presumably for management and internal consumption. (The unabridged version appeared on the web, initially via Buzzfeed, just as executive editor Jill Abramson was getting fired last week — perhaps not coincidentally. The report is dated March 24,...
 
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    LOCAL ONLINER

  • CBS Local Buys Eventful

    Peter
    24 Jul 2014 | 1:35 pm
    Event listing sites were once seen as a leading hub for local media, and a great generator of user generated content and social media. It isn’t clear that they’ve fully caught on in these ways, but they remain strong promotional assets; sell lots of event tickets; and they also bring in related advertising. CBS Local — the digital arm of CBS Radio — obviously sees their value. Today, it announced it is acquiring Eventful, one of the leading listings sites – and one that has evolved over the years to become a major social media player for local entertainment, and for…
  • Wanderful Media Targets SMB Retailers With ‘Find&Save Storefront’

    Peter
    23 Jul 2014 | 3:43 pm
    When it comes to search, promotion, customer engagement and just getting found, the challenge for smaller retailers is to level the playing field with larger players (i.e. Macy’s, Kohl’s, Sears). That’s the idea behind Wanderful Media‘s new Find&Save Storefront, an App that allows SMB retailers to promote sales goods, seasonal collections and other items. Several hundred retailers have downloaded the App, which is in soft launch in several test markets. A major launch is planned for October. The Storefront is an extension of Wanderful Media’s current mission…
  • LevelUp Banks on Smart Watch Adoption for Payments

    Peter
    22 Jul 2014 | 2:31 pm
    Phone-based digital payments haven’t really taken off – in part, because they aren’t much easier to use than credit/debt cards. You’ve still got to take them out of your pocket. The notable exception is the phenomenon of My Starbucks Rewards loyalty program, which now has 10 million Starbucks customers actively using the mobile app, twice the number of a year ago. But if “wearables” take off – i.e. smart watches and to a lesser extent, glasses – there could be rapid growth. In fact, payments are the most practical smartwatch feature (aside from telling the time.)…
  • Twitter Acquires CardSpring; Enters SMB Loyalty and Data Space

    Peter
    18 Jul 2014 | 12:02 pm
    Twitter has made a bold move to go beyond advertising by adding performance marketing to its portfolio via the purchase of CardSpring, the San Francisco-based startup. The acquisition price has not been announced. CardSpring had raised $10 Million since its launch in 2011. One of the big tech challenges in the payments space has been to remake the credit/debit card to a “digital receipt” product that can not only process sales, but also leverage specific SKU information, location and customer behavior to add coupons, loyalty points, events and other ewallet items. That’s the challenge…
  • A Look at Facebook’s ‘Buy Button’ for SMBs

    Peter
    17 Jul 2014 | 2:47 pm
    Facebook hasn’t really been a player in ecommerce –Facebook Credits, its games-oriented initiative, was shut down in 2012 after three years of experimentation with virtual currencies. But it continues to test the waters — which is not surprising, given its volume and huge edge in social media and native advertising. Last year, Facebook began to allow consumers to add credit card information to profiles in order to enable ecommerce transactions. Now, Facebook says it is testing a “Buy Button” with “some” SMBs. During the test, consumers are providing Facebook with…
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    thescoop.org

  • Lightning Strikes

    Derek Willis
    7 Jul 2014 | 5:00 pm
    On November 19, 2009, Jaimi Dowdell of Investigative Reporters & Editors sent an email to more than a dozen of us asking about some ideas for advanced sessions for the 2010 CAR conference in Phoenix. Here’s part of my response: I think the ideas are great. A couple of possible suggestions: A session of “lightning talks”, in which people present a single idea or technique in a short time. I think it would lessen the pressure on presenters and expand the universe of them, too. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lightning_Talk Every once in awhile, I have an idea that pans out. Lightning…
  • How It Starts

    Derek Willis
    21 May 2014 | 5:00 pm
    Tomorrow is Aron Pilhofer’s last day at The New York Times. Aron joined The Times in 2005, first working with the computer-assisted reporting desk then headed by Tom Torok. In the summer of 2007, I was working at washingtonpost.com doing things that other newsrooms weren’t doing. And then Aron started talking about this team he would be building at The Times. It was a compelling pitch, even though washingtonpost.com was ahead of the pack. “You should have a blast,” he wrote in one email. Thanks to Aron, it has been one hell of a ride. It’s instructive to look back at the beginnings…
  • Data Journalism, Student Media Edition

    Derek Willis
    8 Oct 2013 | 5:00 pm
    I had the privilege of speaking to students (and some faculty) at Duke University on Monday, and it was inspiring to see so many people come out to listen to a very geeky talk, to say nothing of the speaker. Afterwards, several students came up to ask how they could start doing data journalism at a student newspaper, particularly at a private university not subject to most public records requests. If I’m going to encourage student journalists to embrace data journalism, it’s only right that I try to provide some suggestions on how to do this in a university environment. First suggestion:…
  • The Natives Aren't Restless Enough

    Derek Willis
    30 Sep 2013 | 5:00 pm
    A couple of points to start with, in the hopes of not wasting readers’ time and preparing for some reactions: This post could be named “Get Off My Lawn” or “In My Day, We Earned It!” or some other title that would demonstrate that I am, more than ever, a cranky old guy now. What follows obviously does not apply to everyone younger than I am (42, for the record). But it does apply to a distressingly large percentage of those who I have taught at the university level (undergraduate and graduate) over the past eight years. This post stems from one sentence in a Poynter summary of a…
  • Teaching Hospitals, Journalism Education and a Hatchet Job

    Derek Willis
    21 Aug 2013 | 5:00 pm
    Donica Mensing and David Ryfe from the Reynolds School of Journalism at the University of Nevada, Reno, have published a paper that attempts to argue that recent attempts by foundations and others advocating for a “teaching hospital” approach to journalism education, while well-intentioned, is actually some sort of “back to the future” plan that would enshrine the journalistic norms of the 1960s and (I am not making this up, I swear) “could actually slow the response to change” by journalism schools. Three questions come to mind: First, could anything really slow the response…
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    yelvington.com

  • Traditional American values

    yelvington
    4 Jul 2014 | 8:49 am
    It is the Fourth of July, Independence Day in the United States, a day when we dress up in red/white/blue outfits, eat hot dogs and barbecue, and set off small explosives. It also is a day for pontificating about what it is to be an American. We don't really need a special day for that, as we now are in a state of continuous political campaigning and under a barrage of propaganda from our "deregulated" broadcasting industry. But a comment that I saw the other day about how we need to return to "traditional American values" is stuck in my head, so I am going to do a bit of pontificating of my…
  • The episode in which I cause the sky to fall on journalism as we know it

    yelvington
    18 Apr 2014 | 12:05 pm
    I was part of a panel discussion of metrics and analytics in the newsroom a couple of weeks ago at the Journalism Interactive conference at the University of Maryland. I approached the subject with some trepidation. Some journalists are resistant to the very idea of measurement, often downright innumerate, and sometimes hostile to any idea that doesn't lead us all back into the honey and clover of the 1980s, before the Internet came along and turned it all into snakes and bees. But I was heartened to find that the room was full of people who were clearly very interested in the subject and…
  • Milepost 20

    yelvington
    2 Apr 2014 | 9:53 am
    I passed another milepost yesterday. April 1 was my 20th anniversary in digital media. I moved from the print newsroom of the Star Tribune on April 1, 1994, found a desk in the tech office, and started noodling on a website prototype on a Mac Quadra. The Web in those days was primitive and the Internet in general was barely out from under "acceptable use policies" that forbade commercial activity. There were no authoring tools. Web browsers couldn't even do tables, so layout was out of the question. Within a month or so we made a decision to skip the Web and build on a commercial online…
  • Spotted gets a new framework

    yelvington
    5 Mar 2014 | 12:02 pm
    Back in the last decade we created a community photo-sharing platform called Spotted. The original idea was borrowed from a simple, successful content/marketing program at Cox Interactive Media, where I was executive editor at the turn of the century. We sent someone with a digital camera to an event with instructions to turn around and shoot the spectators, and hand out business cards. The resulting slideshows were huge traffic generators. At Morris, this was merged with the "anyone can post" philosophy of Flickr and eventually implemented as a Morris DigitalWorks tool that became a…
  • Didn't mean to quit blogging

    yelvington
    5 Mar 2014 | 10:41 am
    I didn't mean to quit blogging, but I've been busy at work and living in two cities. And honestly, I've grown tired of the old pointless debates: free or paid? is the Internet the end of journalism or a new beginning? and so forth. Twitter has displaced blogging of the "blurb and link" variety, and Facebook has displaced blogging of the "I just want to express myself" flavor. I think that narrows the purpose of a blog, but it does not eliminate it. Maybe I'll do some more, now that I hacked my way past a forgotten password problem.
 
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    Pew Research Center's Journalism Project

  • Methodology

    Pew Research Center's Journalism Project
    10 Jul 2014 | 6:00 am
    This study, “America’s Shifting Statehouse Press” employed several methods to obtain a census that is as complete as possible of reporters covering the 50 statehouses in the United States.  The main methods consisted of an intake questionnaire, outreach to press secretaries, legislative staff or state government employees and direct contact via email or phone calls […]
  • Coping with Fewer Reporting Resources

    Pew Research Center's Journalism Project
    10 Jul 2014 | 6:00 am
    Media Collaborations at the Statehouse With fewer resources, legacy organizations have had to figure out new and creative ways to cover news out of the statehouse. A number of them have adopted an approach that in the past would have been unusual, if not unheard of—collaborating with the competition. Other outlets are combining resources with […]
  • Bigger States & Longer Sessions Mean More Statehouse Reporters

    Pew Research Center's Journalism Project
    10 Jul 2014 | 6:00 am
    The number of journalists covering the statehouse varies dramatically from state to state, with some capitols filled with dozens of full-time reporters and others playing host to only two or three. What accounts for these differences in staffing? We looked at several factors that could conceivably be connected to the number of reporters assigned to […]
  • America’s Shifting Statehouse Press

    Pew Research Center's Journalism Project
    10 Jul 2014 | 6:00 am
    A new study finds 1,592 journalists reporting from U.S. statehouses where the ranks of newspaper reporters have shrunk, the number of journalists at nontraditional outlets has grown and observers worry about the quality of coverage.
  • Who Covers the Statehouse

    Pew Research Center's Journalism Project
    10 Jul 2014 | 6:00 am
    These 1,592 reporters come from a wide range of outlets and sectors. Even with the declines of the last decade, newspapers still employ the greatest portion of all statehouse reporters—38% of the total. The next largest employer, television stations, account for less than half as many (17%). They are followed by reporters working for a […]
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    News

  • NPPA BOP Awards Show & Education Festival Line-Up Announced

    2094
    21 Jul 2014 | 1:19 pm
    The National Press Photographers Association's "Best Of Photojournalism Awards Show & Education Festival" is growing near and final plans are being made for the August 8-9, 2014, event in West Palm Beach, FL.
  • Cortona, Where Photography Brought A Town Back To Life

    2094
    20 Jul 2014 | 8:10 pm
    Under the bask of the Tuscan sun it only took four years for the Cortona On The Move photography festival to become one of the world's most important, if not the most fun, annual events on the international photography scene.
  • NPPA Joins FAA Filings Supporting Drone Exemptions

    2094
    17 Jul 2014 | 1:01 am
    The National Press Photographers Association has filed comments to the Federal Aviation Administration in support of petitions from a number of aerial photography and video production companies seeking exemptions from FAA rules to commercially operate small unmanned photography drones.
  • Journalism Groups Urge Obama To Stop Excessive Controls On Public Information

    2094
    8 Jul 2014 | 11:08 am
    Thirty-eight journalism and open government groups (including the National Press Photographers Association) today called on President Barack Obama to stop practices in federal agencies that prevent important information from getting to the public.
  • NPPA Launches Three-Part Series On Stock Photography

    2094
    7 Jul 2014 | 9:47 am
    Today the National Press Photographers Association published the first of a three-part series by Janet Smith on Stock Photography.
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    Online Journalism Blog

  • Hyperlocal Voices: Matthew Duffy, Coventry Culture

    Damian Radcliffe
    18 Jul 2014 | 4:20 am
    Not all hyperlocal sites cover everything that’s happening in the patch, some focus on specific subject areas. The latest in our series of Hyperlocal Voices sees Damian Radcliffe look at Coventry Culture. As the site celebrates its first anniversary this month, founder and editor Matthew Duffy tells him about his journey over the past 12 months. 1.  Who were the people behind the blog? The blog is run entirely by myself. 2.  What made you decide to set up the blog? I began Coventry Culture first and for-most as a third year final project for my Journalism degree course. To expand…
  • Four examples of different threat models

    Paul Bradshaw
    16 Jul 2014 | 11:09 pm
    My post on threat models for journalists is quite lengthy, so I thought I’d put the sample threat models from that in their own, separate post. Here they are – note that these are very simple, sketchy threat models and you would want to expand on these. But hopefully they provide a starting point. A basic threat model for anyone with access to a key social media account – or colleagues who do. This is an example of a threat model for anyone who deals with protestors, complainants, or others who might be targets of others When dealing with whistleblowers, leaks, or sources…
  • Why every journalist should have a threat model (with cats)

    Paul Bradshaw
    15 Jul 2014 | 11:23 pm
    If you’re a journalist in the 21st century you have two choices: you can choose to be paranoid, or you can choose to be delusional. The paranoid journalist assumes that someone is out to get them. The delusional journalist assumes that no one is. In this post I will explain why and how every journalist – whether you’re a music reporter or a political correspondent – can take a serious and informed look at their security and arrive at a reasonable evaluation of risks and safeguards. Don’t panic. I promise that by the end of this piece you will be less…
  • SEO recruiters look for journalists as Google gets fussier

    Nick Chowdrey
    10 Jul 2014 | 4:18 am
    Searches for ‘content marketing’ according to Google Trends. Since February the term has been at the peak of its popularity [Tweet this image]In a guest post for OJB, Nick Chowdrey looks at why increasing numbers of SEO agencies are hiring journalists. As online marketing and search engine optimisation (SEO) practices have evolved, journalists have become increasingly sought-after by the agencies that compete to improve their clients’ rankings. “For a long time there was a very poor practice in online marketing,” says Joe Sharp, Head of SEO at Hearst…
  • Over 1000 journalists are now exploring scraping techniques. Incredible.

    Paul Bradshaw
    9 Jul 2014 | 1:56 am
    Last week the number of people who have bought my ebook Scraping for Journalists passed the 1,000 mark. That is, to me, incredible. A thousand journalists interested enough in scraping to buy a book? What happened? When I first began writing the book I imagined there might be perhaps 100 people in the world who would be interested in buying it. It was such a niche subject I didn’t even consider pitching it to my normal publishers. Now it’s so mainstream that the 1000th ‘book’ was actually 12: purchased by a university which wanted multiple copies for its…
 
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    Common Sense Journalism

  • Not to pick a fight, but SCPA leader's FOI commentary misses important context

    Doug Fisher
    17 Jul 2014 | 10:42 pm
    Bill Rogers, head of the S.C. Press Association, has written a forceful and important column on two recent state Supreme Court rulings that have done major damage to freedom of information in the state.Bill is good and valued friend, and I don't want to pick a fight. And I agree forcefully with his frustrations over both these court rulings and trying to get any changes to the FOI Act through the Legislature. But I think the order in which he presents his argument is important when read with the court' ruling.Bill writes:The public also lost a few weeks ago when the high court ruled that…
  • Body blow two to S.C. FOI

    Doug Fisher
    17 Jul 2014 | 12:10 am
    A few weeks ago, it was a ruling by South Carolina's Supreme Court saying that public bodies were not required to post meeting agendas that punched a hole in South Carolina's FOI law.Now it has ruled that autopsy reports are medical records not subject to disclosure. (PDF of ruling.) While I felt the last ruling was defensible because of a poorly worded law, this one is just bad public policy. As reported in the Sumter case in question, the autopsy report the newspaper eventually got elsewhere seemed to contradict the police explanation in a man's shooting.This is one where I think…
  • Journalism Education: If you teach reporting, especially public affairs, you must download this financial guide

    Doug Fisher
    2 Jul 2014 | 6:21 am
    If you teach public affairs reporting -- or are a journalist who has to deal with local government -- you really should download Governing magazine's "A Public Official's Guide to Financial Literacy." Fantastic teaching tool.Plain English.Any guide that gives your students (or you) a fighting chance of understanding GO vs. the types of revenue bonds; or cash, accrual and modified accrual accounting (gotta know that to be able to read the financials) is worth every minute you spend with it (and that won't be many because it's only 34 easy-to-digest pages).(I should warn you, you will be asked…
  • The promise -- and peril -- in Atlanta editor's words

    Doug Fisher
    23 Jun 2014 | 12:08 pm
    The Atlanta Journal-Constitution's managing editor, Bert Roughton Jr., told Poynter last week: I can’t have people stuck on beats that may or may not have audiences all the time.In that simple sentence lies the complicated tale of the current state of the news industry, at once fraught with promise and peril.Roughton said those words in the context of trying to, as he put it, "smartly" manage what has been one of the more decimated staffs, having gone from about 500 people to about 180 in a bit more than a decade.The AJC was one of the first to go "digital first," in 2007 moving its spot…
  • FOI: A problematic S.C. ruling

    Doug Fisher
    19 Jun 2014 | 6:40 am
    South Carolina's Supreme Court has come down with a Freedom of Information Act ruling (PDF) that is problematic.I choose that word carefully over "troubling" because I don't think the ruling is wrong. But I think it outlines starkly the reality of the "official" attitude toward conducting public business and the confrontational situation that we often find ourselves in -- as journalists and the public -- with governmental bodies.A Saluda County resident challenged that county council's amending of a meeting agenda during a meeting. The Circuit Court said there was no violation -- that no…
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    The Newspaper Guild

  • Afghan Police Officer Convicted, Sentenced to Death in Killing of AP Photojournalist Anja Niedringhaus

    Janelle
    24 Jul 2014 | 11:20 am
    Associated PressJuly 24, 2014Huffington PostA Kabul court announced Wednesday that the Afghan police officer charged with killing Associated Press photographer Anja Niedringhaus and wounding veteran AP correspondent Kathy Gannon has been convicted and sentenced to death. It was the first court hearing in the case and, under Afghan law, the verdict and sentence are subject to several stages of review. Six judges at the Kabul District Court found former Afghan police unit commander Naqibullah guilty of murder and treason over the attack in the southeastern city of Khost that targeted the…
  • For White House Interviews, It's Never Just One-on-One

    Janelle
    24 Jul 2014 | 8:03 am
    Paul FarhiJuly 24, 2014The Washington PostWhen NBC News White House reporter Chuck Todd conducts background interviews with government officials these days, he and his source usually aren’t the only ones in the room or on the call. Typically, there’s a third party: A representative of the White House’s press staff monitors the conversation. Sometimes, the press monitor interjects to clarify a point the official makes. Other times, he or she remains silent. Each time, however, “it feels like having a third wheel on a date,” Todd says. “It’s like having a chaperon.” He adds,…
  • Media Investors Buy Guild-Represented Providence Journal

    Janelle
    23 Jul 2014 | 11:00 am
    StaffJuly 23, 2014Providence JournalDallas-based A.H. Belo Corporation, which has owned The Providence Journal for 17 years, announced late Tuesday afternoon that it agreed to sell the newspaper operation to New Media Investment Group Inc., parent company of GateHouse Media, for $46 million. Providence Guild President John Hill said the local needs more information than it's gotten so far. "The announcement pretty much confirmed the rumors that we'd been hearing over the past few weeks. We're obviously following this closely but unless and until the sale is concluded, and we know the terms,…
  • Smiles All Around as Chicago Guild Helps Women in Need

    Janelle
    23 Jul 2014 | 10:58 am
    Women's CommitteeJuly 23, 2014Chicago Newspaper Guild The Chicago Newspaper Guild Women’s Committee held its second, hugely successful, community event this month, with a “beauty night” at the St. Mary of Providence Home in Chicago. The charitable facility is home to many women in need of developmental training. Between 35 and 40 eager participants were treated to make-up application, facials, manicures, massages and hair styling July 10 by a half-dozen Guild members. “We all felt our hearts warming as the ladies laughed and smiled,” said Grace Catania, chair of the Chicago…
  • AP Members Protest Nationwide as Talks Hit One Year

    Janelle
    22 Jul 2014 | 8:10 am
    Martha WaggonerJuly 22, 2014News Media GuildMarking the one-year anniversary of difficult contract talks with The Associated Press, staffers covered by the News Media Guild are participating in multiple protests today. The Guild has pushed for affordable health care and job security during a year of bargaining that began July 22, 2013, while the company continues to demand major concessions. Bargaining is scheduled for today and Wednesday, July 22-23. Protest highlights include a four-day byline strike, "Happy Anniversary" cards being signed by members and sent to bosses and AP management, a…
 
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    Media | The Guardian

  • The politics of war photography | @guardianletters

    Guardian Staff
    24 Jul 2014 | 11:33 am
    Suzanne Moore is absolutely right to condemn the tweeting of images of dead children in Gaza (Sharing pictures of corpses on social media isnt the way to bring a ceasefire , 22 July). They are an affront to the very essence of a civilised society.If the images were to prevent war I could understand, but they wont. Instead, they will create even more hatred and a craving for revenge, which in turn will recruit yet more bloodthirsty jihadis. The last thing we need is more voyeuristic war pornography on our social media.Stan LabovitchWindsor, Berkshire Continue reading...
  • NUJ's colourful resolution about Richard Desmond is throwback to the 1970s

    Roy Greenslade
    24 Jul 2014 | 7:29 am
    Resolutions passed by chapels of the National Union of Journalists, especially at popular newspapers, were once known for their colourful language.In the 1970s, the high point of NUJ activism, they tended to be anything but conciliatory. So the latest example - passed by the staff at Express Newspapers - is something of a welcome throwback."This chapel does not see why hardworking journalists should subsidise Britain's greediest billionaire. It rejects Richard Desmond's damaging and flawed proposals to cut a third of editorial posts across Express Newspapers. We say these historic titles…
  • Ex-NoW journalist Dan Evans gets suspended sentence over hacking

    Peter Walker
    24 Jul 2014 | 6:12 am
    Feature writer at now-defunct tabloid gets suspended sentence in recognition for cooperation with police and prosecutorsA former journalist at the News of the World who admitted listening to more than 1,000 hacked voicemail messages has been spared a "significant" jail sentence because of what the judge said was his unique role in giving the prosecution evidence in the trial of Andy Coulson, Rebekah Brooks and others.Dan Evans, a features writer at the now-defunct tabloid under Coulson, told the phone-hacking trial that the practice of eavesdropping on others' voicemails was so…
  • Commonwealth Games opening ceremony leaves Sun's Scottish editor gasping | Media Monkey

    Monkey
    24 Jul 2014 | 6:10 am
    Gordon Smart rages on Twitter over expensive drinks and lack of food but changes his mind once he's had a pintThe joyous spirit of the Commonwealth Games opening ceremony failed to engulf Gordon Smart, the Suns Scottish editor. Can't get a beer and no food ready at opening ceremony. Knew I should have taken prawn sandwich tickets #Glasgow2014And here's my view. Is this a wind-up? Should have stayed in the office #Glasgow2014 pic.twitter.com/TxwsEvifSOClose to the full Falling Down Michael Douglas rage. Haven't been this angry since that bam David Guetta started a gig at my bedroom windowWe…
  • Richard Desmond is Britains greediest billionaire, claims NUJ

    Mark Sweney
    24 Jul 2014 | 5:34 am
    Union attacks owner of Express and Star titles for planning to cut 200 posts while receiving £450m from the sale of Channel 5Richard Desmond has been branded Britains greediest billionaire by the journalists trade union for looking to cut 200 staff, while pocketing £450m from the sale of Channel 5. Continue reading...
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    OUPblog » Media

  • Veils and the choice of society

    DanP
    13 Jul 2014 | 12:30 am
    By Can Yeginsu and Jessica Elliott On 1 July 2014, the Grand Chamber of the European Court of Human Rights held that France’s ban on wearing full-face veils in public pursued a legitimate aim because it reflected a “choice of society”. Although the Court found that the blanket prohibition amounted to an interference with the religious rights of the minority in France that wore the full-face veil, it was justified because it protected the rights of others to have the option of facial interaction with that minority. The Court accepted that this right of potential facial interaction forms…
  • Mormon women “bloggers”: a long tradition

    AlyssaB
    11 Jul 2014 | 2:30 am
    By Paula Kelly Harline Mormon bloggers have been in the news lately, with a blogger recently being excommunicated from the church. It was Ordain Women founder Kate Kelly’s call-to-action writings, meant to recruit Mormon women to her cause, that recently led to her excommunication from the Mormon Church. If Kelly is an example, Mormon women are no wimps. Because the Church is staffed by lay members, Mormon women routinely run entire Church organizations numbering up to 200 people; they make up one-third of the current missionary population; they believe in education; and they have a long…
  • The #BringBackOurGirls rallying point

    Alice
    7 Jul 2014 | 7:30 am
    By Isaac Terwase Sampson The Boko Haram (BH) terrorist group, responsible for the abduction of over 200 school girls in north-eastern Nigeria, has been Nigeria’s prime security threat since 2009. Although the group has carried out innumerable acts of terror in Nigeria since 2009, its abduction of more than 200 girls at Government Girls Secondary School Chibok, on 14 April 2014, outraged the world and gave it reinforced international currency. The global and Nigerian Muslim community has since distanced itself from Boko Haram’s violent ideology. In the face of current cosmopolitan campaign…
  • Discovering digital libraries

    Alice
    29 Jun 2014 | 5:30 am
    By Ian Anstice English public librarians don’t get out much. Sure, we’re often dealing with the public every open hour or talking with our teams but, well, we normally just don’t meet librarians from neighbouring authorities, let alone from around the country. Most branch staff stay in their own building and may never talk to anyone from another authority other than on the phone arranging for a book for a customer. So, it was a delight for me to be invited by Oxford University Press (OUP) to an afternoon to meet with nineteen other library professionals, ranging from…
  • Political apparatus of rape in India

    JonathanK
    19 Jun 2014 | 7:30 am
    Last week the Guardian reported, “A state minister from Indian prime minister Narendra Modi’s ruling party has described rape as a ‘social crime’, saying ‘sometimes it’s right, sometimes it’s wrong’, in the latest controversial remarks by an Indian politician about rape.”  While horrified by these comments, I remembered that a book from OUP India’s office had recently landed on my desk and the author, Pratiksha Baxi, might be able to shed some light on the issue of rape in India for Westerners.  Below is a post Baxi sent in response to my query following the…
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    Blogposts | The Guardian

  • Gaza crisis: UN claims Israel did not allow evacuation from shelter before strikes - as it happened

    Alexandra Topping in London and Tom McCarthy in New York
    24 Jul 2014 | 2:18 pm
    Israeli army says it allowed four hours for evacuationsIsraeli strike on UN shelter kills at least 15US says Israel 'could take additional steps to prevent civilian casualties'Protest marches unfold in West Bank and Tel AvivRead the latest blog summary 10.18pm BST We're going to wrap up our live blog coverage for the day. Here's a summary of where things stand: An Israeli strike on a UN shelter in Beit Hanoun killed at least 15 Palestinians and wounded 200, mostly women and children seeking cover there. The Israeli military said it was responding to fire in the area. 10.00pm BST UN secretary…
  • Commonwealth Games: day one as it happened

    Daniel Harris (earlier) and Nick Miller
    24 Jul 2014 | 2:14 pm
    Alistair Brownlee beat his brother Jonny to triathlon gold, Bradley Wiggins and the England team pursuit quartet claimed silver, while Hannah Miley won and Ross Mudrich pulled off a shock in the pool. 10.14pm BST And that should just about be your lot for today. See you tomorrow for more of the same. 10.12pm BST Gymnastics: The results are in for the rhythmic gymnastics team final, and Canada have claimed the gold, Wales the silver and Malaysia the bronze. Well done to all concerned. 10.10pm BST Gymnastics: I'll level with you, I haven't the first idea what's happening, but they are play9ing…
  • Readers recommend: songs about prostitution | Peter Kimpton

    Peter Kimpton
    24 Jul 2014 | 2:00 pm
    Strumpets to courtesans, molls to midnight gigolos, escorts to extras, suggest your song pleasures for this week's potent topic"Suppress prostitution, and capricious lusts will overthrow society," remarked St Augustine, eyeing a flagon of mead, and somewhat surprising the merry company with his fifth-century mixed morality. But then, with a Martini in her elegant hand, a distinctly less saintly Marlene Dietrich added: "Indeed darling, a country without bordellos is like a house without bathrooms." Playwright Brendan Behan chipped in with an toothy Irish grin, having dished…
  • The Honourable Woman recap: episode four The Ribbon Cutter

    Gabriel Tate
    24 Jul 2014 | 2:00 pm
    A harrowing instalment where the series comes of age, as one long flashback answers many of the questions posed so farFinally, some answers. While, for some of you, patience was understandably wearing thin, this hour clarified much of what we've seen over the past three weeks. If you've given up on the series and just checked in here anyway, stop reading now go back and watch episode four, then come back and join the BTL fun. You won't regret it, I promise. Because The Honourable Woman came of age with The Ribbon Cutter. No more games, no more teasing. Instead the characters front up to the…
  • Siberian dinosaur spreads feathers around the dinosaur tree

    Dr Dave Hone
    24 Jul 2014 | 11:26 am
    Newly discovered Kulindadromeus opens up the possibility of many more dinosaurs having been coated in feather-like structuresFor the last 20 years, huge numbers of fossils from China have dramatically demonstrated that large numbers of dinosaur species that were closely related to the birds had all manner of feathers on their bodies. However, a new find named Kulindadromeus from eastern Russia published today in Science, suggests that in fact feathers, or at least very feather-like structures may have been present in huge numbers of other species of dinosaur, including those which are from…
 
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    blog maverick

  • AEREO – Everything Old is New Again

    CyberDust ID - Blogmaverick
    19 Jul 2014 | 4:30 pm
    AEREO deserves a lot of credit for their effort.  It was a long and expensive shot to do what they went for.  But they went for it.  And they attempted to pivot after their SCOTUS loss. I was watching with interest, because it is something we had examined 15 years ago at Broadcast.com The technology has obviously gotten better on all sides of the equation, but sometimes a good idea is a good idea. Even if it is hard to make work.  This is from January of 2000. What is fascinating is the alliances and attempts that were being made or considered.   We also did the same kind of work to…
  • The Idiots Guide to High Frequency Trading

    CyberDust ID - Blogmaverick
    3 Apr 2014 | 1:28 pm
    First, let me say what you read here is going to be wrong in several ways.  HFT covers such a wide path of trading that different parties participate or are impacted in different ways. I wanted to put this out there as a starting point . Hopefully the comments will help further educate us all 1.  Electronic trading is part of HFT, but not all electronic trading is high frequency trading. Trading equities and other financial instruments has been around for a long time.  it is Electronic Trading that has lead to far smaller spreads and lower actual trading costs from your broker.  Very…
  • High Frequency Trading, and Proof that the SEC Approach to Insider Trading is Completely Wrong

    CyberDust ID - Blogmaverick
    2 Apr 2014 | 7:05 am
    Got to love Mary Jo White, the Chairwoman of the SEC.  While Michael Lewis’s book Flash Boys was getting all the headlines and was the topic of some of the best television  on CNBC, ever, Ms White used the firestorm to ask for more money for the SEC. Shocking ? The only shock would be if she didn’t use any occasion the SEC was in the public eye to ask for more money. It is unfortunate because there is no greater waste of money than what the SEC spends trying to enforce  insider trading laws. Let me give you some examples of just how poorly the SEC manages our tax dollars when…
  • The Back to the Future Arbitrage of Silicon Valley and what it will take to beat it

    CyberDust ID - Blogmaverick
    19 Mar 2014 | 10:05 am
    I’m not a huge fan of Silicon Valley. It reminds me so much of Hollywood and the movie and TV industry. In Hollywood every one will talk and listen to you about your project.  But while they are standing there, right in front of you, they are not looking at you. They are looking past you to the next project where they can raise/sell more.  Where they can be a bigger star. There is always a bigger fish. Who ever is standing in front of them is hopefully just the bait. Silicon Valley has become the exact same thing these days. No one wants to literally start from scratch in a garage and…
  • My 2 cents on Sports Marketing and what I learned from SMU Basketball this week

    CyberDust ID - Blogmaverick
    23 Feb 2014 | 9:46 am
    I had the pleasure of going to an SMU Basketball game this past week. It wasn’t a huge game from a standings perspective. It wasn’t a big rivalry game.  It wasn’t a game between 2 powerhouse teams. It was an important game as every game is for an up and coming team like SMU.  But there was no one outside the two teams that were really paying attention to the outcome. Bottom line, it was a game on the schedule. It was a game on the schedule for every one but SMU basketball fans.  For SMU basketball fans it was their chance to show off to any and all newcomers who walked…
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    One Man and His Blog

  • Dumping the newspaper

    Adam Tinworth
    24 Jul 2014 | 3:55 am
    Breaking up with newspapers: I’ve found a platform that fulfills my news-reading needs. My Internet-powered cell phone has replaced you, and it’s time for us to go our separate ways. To be honest, newspaper, I’ve been using my new platform for years now, while I’ve tossed you into the recycle bin nearly every day. And interesting counter-point to David Ho yesterday.
  • news:rewired - Startup culture in a big broadcaster

    Adam Tinworth
    24 Jul 2014 | 3:45 am
    How do you bring start-up thinking to a traditional broadcaster? That's what Stijn Lehaen set out to explain in the closing session of news:rewired yesterday. The Belgian broadcaster was struggling online, at least in comparison to its traditional presence. So it set up a startup-style division called VRT Start-up at the edge of the organisation, headed by Lehaen. They worked with Made by Many to implement the lean startup approach to working. They have user insight sessions every two weeks, where they talk with pairs of friends about what they expect from media. Why friends? Well, the idea…
  • news:rewired: filling your social media toolbox

    Adam Tinworth
    23 Jul 2014 | 8:57 am
    Sarah Marshall, social media editor EMEA, WSJ 9 clever uses of social media tools Tweetdeck - use two columns for the same search term, one for the term, and one for the term, but filtered by retweet. Twitter Collections (was custom timelines) - drag tweets into a custom timeline, to gather them all in one place for later use. Twitter Lists: on Twitter, select Timelines on the left, and then select lists - to find experts in a field Facebook Geolocation (selecting where posts are targeted): works really well if you have a large following in that region already. Posst without images or links…
  • Reddit for Journalists

    Adam Tinworth
    23 Jul 2014 | 7:10 am
    Three speakers at news:rewired talking about use of Reddit in journalism, moderated by Mark Frankel, assistant editor, social news, BBC James Cook, Daily Dot There's two main tasks: Finding new stories Sharing stories How do you get started? Sign up. That allows you to start following what you're really interested in. Reddit is made of communities of interests: subreddits. How do you do Reddit wrong? Don't identify yourself. Reddit is great at identifying who you are - and if you're pretending to be someone else, you'll be busted. Be honest about who you are. Be honest and you'll get good…
  • news:rewired - New forms of engagement for journalism

    Adam Tinworth
    23 Jul 2014 | 3:06 am
    Matt Nevarra hosting Panel: Bella Hurrell, assistant editor, visual journalism, BBC News Ezra Eeman, founder, Journalism Tools Jo Kelly, head of audience engagement, Trinity Mirror Ben Fogarty, chief executive, Shorthand Bella Hurrell "Tell me something I don't know" is a basic journalistic premise. Over 50% of traffic to the BBC website is coming from mobile devices now - so everything has to be responsive. It ha to adapt to different screen sizes. They're expiring ways of spreading their stories beyond the site. Flat info graphics, simple, but to the point, have been one focus, They're…
 
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    The American Prospect

  • The Worst Excuse for Plagiarism You'll Ever Hear

    Paul Waldman
    24 Jul 2014 | 9:57 am
    Yesterday, the New York Times published an article with compelling evidence that Sen. John Walsh, the Montana Democrat who was appointed to fill the seat of Max Baucus when Baucus became ambassador to China, plagiarized most of the master's thesis he wrote at the Army War College. I confess I had no opinion about Walsh before this (he was likely to lose in November anyway, and hasn't done anything of note in his brief time in the Senate), but there are two things I want to point out. You can read Walsh's entire thesis at the Times, and it won't take you that long, because not including…
  • Hobby Lobby Decision Could Give License to Anti-Labor 'Biblical Economics' Practices

    Peter Montgomery
    24 Jul 2014 | 6:26 am
    AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais A demonstrator dressed as the 'Bible' stands outside the Supreme Court building awaiting the court's decision on the Hobby Lobby case in Washington, Monday, June 30, 2014. The Supreme Court says corporations can hold religious objections that allow them to opt out of the new health law requirement that they cover contraceptives for women. This article originally appeared on Right Wing Watch, the website published by People For the American Way. Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg wrote in her dissent in the Hobby Lobby case that the Court’s…
  • Hillary for Liberals: A Conversation With Walter Shapiro

    Harold Meyerson
    23 Jul 2014 | 5:37 pm
    As a reporter and columnist for Time, Newsweek, the Washington Post, USA Today, Esquire, Salon, and other publications, Walter Shapiro has covered nine presidential elections and the nation’s politics for four decades. He is currently a fellow at the Brennan Center for Justice at New York University and a lecturer in political science at Yale while he finishes a book about his great-uncle, a vaudevillian and con man who once swindled Hitler. Shapiro is also an accomplished Hillary-ologist, having first interviewed Hillary Clinton in the Arkansas governor’s mansion for Time in September…
  • On Israel, Looking for Hope In a Sea of Bad Faith and Despair

    Paul Waldman
    23 Jul 2014 | 11:08 am
    If you don't have mixed feelings about what's going on in Gaza, there's something seriously wrong with you. As Gershom Gorenberg says in his piece today, in a war, both sides can be wrong, and that's the case now. So how do we find a way to think and talk about this conflict when our natural impulse is to take a side? Complicating things even further is the fact that the people who do think that there's no ambiguity here range from the morally infantile to the unspeakably ghastly, and no matter what you say you'll find yourself on the same side as some of them, if only for a moment. On one…
  • This Is Your Brain on War: A Dispatch From Jerusalem

    Gershom Gorenberg
    23 Jul 2014 | 7:05 am
    AP Photo/Hatem Moussa Smoke and fire from the explosion of an Israeli strike rise over Gaza City, Tuesday, July 22, 2014, as Israeli airstrikes pummeled a wide range of locations along the coastal area and diplomatic efforts intensified to end the two-week war.   As I write, the livestream from Gaza of news about death continues. If I give a casualty count, it may be outdated before I finish typing it. It won't include those Palestinians—civilians and Hamas fighters—who may be buried in rubble in the Sajaiya neighborhood of Gaza City, which the Israeli army has invaded in search of…
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    Nieman Journalism Lab

  • Twitter is public, but who does that benefit?

    Caroline O'Donovan
    24 Jul 2014 | 2:39 pm
    You may remember a public debate that was sparked not too long ago by a BuzzFeed story about sexual assault: Are tweets public? What sort of judgment should journalists use when amplifying statements made by regular people on social media? Anil Dash returned to the topic today, with a post on Medium titled “What is Public?” In it, Dash brings up concerns about how industry leaders in tech and media conceive of privacy — typically, he argues, however it best serves their own interests. It has so quickly become acceptable practice within mainstream web publishing companies to…
  • NowThis News drops the News from its name

    Caroline O'Donovan
    24 Jul 2014 | 10:00 am
    Digiday has an update today on the relaunch over at NowThis, formerly NowThis News. Now, even a minute can seem like an eternity. And so NowThis has largely moved to 15-second videos, and the anchor has been replaced by text on the screen. NowThis also has dropped the “News” from its brand to reflect a broadening of its coverage to include op-eds, science and viral content. [...] “We don’t want to box ourselves in,” Mills said. “We are still a news company, but the definition of news has changed so much, and it means different things to different people. Our hyperfocus is…
  • It’s time to apply for a visiting Nieman Fellowship

    Ann Marie Lipinski
    24 Jul 2014 | 9:45 am
    Not every journalist who would make an awesome Nieman Fellow is ready to spend a full academic year here or has a study plan or project that merits that commitment. And not everyone whose work is having an impact on the future of news is a journalist. That’s long been true of publishers and media company owners, but developers, entrepreneurs, academics, and others are increasingly influential in the news ecosystem — sometimes because they’re building the tools and organizations that journalists want or need to work with. These were the facts that prompted me to propose a new visiting…
  • A new Guardian interactive tells the story of World War I in seven languages

    Joseph Lichterman
    23 Jul 2014 | 10:08 am
    To mark the 100th anniversary of the start of World War I, The Guardian today launched a massive 32-minute interactive documentary that illustrates the history of the war. The Guardian’s aim with the interactive is to tell the story of the war from a global perspective. To achieve that, the documentary includes 10 historians from all around the world discussing the war and its impact from their country’s perspective. In a blog post on The Guardian’s website, special projects editor Francesca Panetta explained how her team set out to get a global perspective on World War I: I…
  • Is the river behind your house rising? A British Twitter bot will tell you

    Joshua Benton
    22 Jul 2014 | 9:02 am
    Here’s an interesting project from the data-oriented software developer Shoothill: GaugeMap is an interactive map with live river-level data from over 2,400 government gauges across England and Wales. From the announcement: GaugeMap aims to help to look after and improve the natural environment by allowing these users to access this data on the move, wherever they are. Users can retrieve live data on actual river levels via the website, or by following the new, dedicated Twitter accounts that GaugeMap has established for each of the Environment Agency‘s 2,400+ river level monitoring…
 
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    Failure Magazine's Feature Articles

  • United Flight 232

    jzasky@aol.com
    13 Jul 2014 | 4:57 pm
    Twenty-five years ago this month, United Airlines Flight 232—scheduled from Denver to Philadelphia via Chicago—crash-landed at Sioux Gateway Airport in Sioux City, Iowa, killing 112 people. The outcome could have been worse.
  • Gruesome Spectacles

    jzasky@aol.com
    16 Jun 2014 | 5:31 am
    Botched executions are up since 1980, suggesting that technology has failed to make the process more reliable and humane.
  • The Walking Dead

    jzasky@aol.com
    20 Apr 2014 | 4:27 pm
    Before Wimbledon, the Masters, the World Series, and the Super Bowl, there was the Astley Belt Race, a six-day walking match that determined the world’s champion pedestrian.
  • Trapped Under the Sea

    jzasky@aol.com
    8 Apr 2014 | 4:53 pm
    Lessons learned from a little-known construction accident, which threatened the completion of the world’s longest single-entrance tunnel, as well as a decade-long effort to clean up Boston Harbor.
  • Kitty Genovese, 50 Years Later

    jzasky@aol.com
    12 Mar 2014 | 4:53 pm
    In “Kitty Genovese,” author Kevin Cook debunks the myth that “38 respectable, law-abiding citizens in Queens watched a killer stalk and stab a woman in three separate attacks in Kew Gardens.”
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    Common Sense Journalism

  • Not to pick a fight, but SCPA leader's FOI commentary misses important context

    17 Jul 2014 | 10:42 pm
    Bill Rogers, head of the S.C. Press Association, has written a forceful and important column on two recent state Supreme Court rulings that have done major damage to freedom of information in the state.Bill is good and valued friend, and I don't want to pick a fight. And I agree forcefully with his frustrations over both these court rulings and trying to get any changes to the FOI Act through the Legislature. But I think the order in which he presents his argument is important when read with the court' ruling.Bill writes:The public also lost a few weeks ago when the high court ruled that…
  • Body blow two to S.C. FOI

    17 Jul 2014 | 12:10 am
    A few weeks ago, it was a ruling by South Carolina's Supreme Court saying that public bodies were not required to post meeting agendas that punched a hole in South Carolina's FOI law.Now it has ruled that autopsy reports are medical records not subject to disclosure. (PDF of ruling.) While I felt the last ruling was defensible because of a poorly worded law, this one is just bad public policy. As reported in the Sumter case in question, the autopsy report the newspaper eventually got elsewhere seemed to contradict the police explanation in a man's shooting.This is one where I think…
  • Journalism Education: If you teach reporting, especially public affairs, you must download this financial guide

    2 Jul 2014 | 6:21 am
    If you teach public affairs reporting -- or are a journalist who has to deal with local government -- you really should download Governing magazine's "A Public Official's Guide to Financial Literacy." Fantastic teaching tool.Plain English.Any guide that gives your students (or you) a fighting chance of understanding GO vs. the types of revenue bonds; or cash, accrual and modified accrual accounting (gotta know that to be able to read the financials) is worth every minute you spend with it (and that won't be many because it's only 34 easy-to-digest pages).(I should warn you, you will be asked…
  • The promise -- and peril -- in Atlanta editor's words

    23 Jun 2014 | 12:08 pm
    The Atlanta Journal-Constitution's managing editor, Bert Roughton Jr., told Poynter last week: I can’t have people stuck on beats that may or may not have audiences all the time.In that simple sentence lies the complicated tale of the current state of the news industry, at once fraught with promise and peril.Roughton said those words in the context of trying to, as he put it, "smartly" manage what has been one of the more decimated staffs, having gone from about 500 people to about 180 in a bit more than a decade.The AJC was one of the first to go "digital first," in 2007 moving its spot…
  • FOI: A problematic S.C. ruling

    19 Jun 2014 | 6:40 am
    South Carolina's Supreme Court has come down with a Freedom of Information Act ruling (PDF) that is problematic.I choose that word carefully over "troubling" because I don't think the ruling is wrong. But I think it outlines starkly the reality of the "official" attitude toward conducting public business and the confrontational situation that we often find ourselves in -- as journalists and the public -- with governmental bodies.A Saluda County resident challenged that county council's amending of a meeting agenda during a meeting. The Circuit Court said there was no violation -- that no…
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    Poynter. » Mobile Media

  • As mobile ad revenue continues to soar, newspapers still struggle to catch the wave

    Rick Edmonds
    2 Jul 2014 | 10:32 am
    There was a double dose of good news in eMarketer’s mid-year ad forecast released today. Ad spending will grow more than 5 percent in 2014 for the first time in 10 years. And the mobile ad boom shows no sign of plateauing with 83 percent growth over 2013 expected. Digital giants like Facebook and Google continue to dominate the category (together more than 50 percent), while newspapers and magazine struggle to offer competitive ad buys on their mobile products. The Newspaper Association of America’s revenue report for 2013, released in April, found that mobile advertising had…
  • How small screens impact photojournalism — and tips for adapting

    Sam Kirkland
    21 May 2014 | 5:15 am
    On Sunday morning, before I got out of bed, I started reading a story from The New York Times on my phone. I found it via Twitter, naturally, and enjoyed Freda Moon’s account of a journey from Chicago to New Orleans aboard a vintage Pullman sleeper car. But halfway through the story, I realized I had scrolled past thumbnail images without giving them any thought (see screenshot at the right). Each photo — smaller than a postage stamp — failed to grab my attention until I recognized the name of the photographer, an intern at the Chicago Sun-Times when I worked there. That’s…
  • Quantcast: Social drives 34 percent of mobile Web traffic, 17 percent of desktop traffic

    Sam Kirkland
    15 May 2014 | 9:14 am
    Quantcast Nearly 4 in 5 news and entertainment sites are optimized for mobile devices, according to a new report by Web analytics firm Quantcast. And those sites see an average of 33 percent of their overall traffic come from mobile devices, while sites that aren’t mobile-optimized see an average of 28 percent of traffic from mobile. That correlation could have big implications for social media strategy, too, as Quantcast found that social accounted for 34 percent of mobile referrals, twice as much as social accounted for on desktop. It’s further evidence that the mobile Web…
  • News in motion: six ways to be a good mobile editor

    David Ho
    25 Mar 2014 | 5:15 am
    So you want to be a mobile editor? Or maybe you just got the gig. Congratulations! Now what? I’ve heard that question a lot lately from newly minted mobile editors at organizations big and small. It’s not that surprising. Mobile has been the coming future of news and information for a long time, but many news outlets only woke up to its importance in the last year. Why? That’s easy: 50 percent. Last year, many news organizations either hit or approached the 50 percent mark in digital traffic coming from mobile. That opened many eyes. It became very clear that mobile…
  • Bloomberg View: latest mobile-first site to embrace the grid, shun visual hierarchy

    Sam Kirkland
    25 Feb 2014 | 2:41 pm
    Bloomberg View, no longer just an opinion vertical at bloomberg.com, has launched a standalone, image-heavy website, which publisher Tim O’Brien told Capital New York is “a departure for Bloomberg.” But the startling new emphasis on visuals borders on overkill. Here’s how Nieman Lab’s Joshua Benton put it: Today In The Continuing Conquest of The News Web By Uniform Rectangular Images With Text Overlays: http://t.co/b8X5odH4rq — Joshua Benton (@jbenton) February 25, 2014 The Bloomberg View site resembles this month’s NBC News redesign, with story cards…
 
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    Pacific Standard

  • How the Supremes Pick Their Cases—and Why Obamacare Is Safe for Now

    Rebecca Buckwalter-Poza
    24 Jul 2014 | 10:58 am
    Although I couldn’t tell you whether I learned it for cocktail parties or lectures, one of the first topics I seized on upon entering law school was, in the lingo of Schoolhouse Rock!, how a lawsuit becomes a Supreme Court case. Getting four Justices to vote to hear a case had to be a more legible, more routinized process than pundits and politicos made it seem, I thought. Surely experts had answers. If you just pegged the right legal and political variables, or spoke to enough constitutional law scholars and former Supreme Court clerks, you’d be able to make fairly accurate predictions.
  • There’s a Name for Why Your Performance on Certain Tasks Meets the Low Expectations of Others

    Pacific Standard Staff
    24 Jul 2014 | 10:00 am
    Imagine a young woman is about to take a math test. Just before she picks up her No. 2 pencil, her teacher mentions the old saw that girls are bad with numbers. Even if she’s actually a math whiz, the student is liable to do worse than she would have done if her teacher had kept his trap shut. Such is the power of something called stereotype threat: When you’re made aware that society expects people like you to do poorly at a given task, your performance tends to conform to that expectation. Not only do stereotypes offer prejudiced folk an excuse to discriminate, the mere mention of a…
  • The People Who Are Scared of Dogs

    Benoit Denizet-Lewis
    24 Jul 2014 | 9:48 am
    This article is adapted from Benoit Denizet-Lewis’s new book, Travels With Casey: My Journey Through Our Dog-Crazy Country, out this week from Simon & Schuster. To learn more about the book, visit www.travelswithcasey.com. As I drove around the country with my dog to research a book about dogs in contemporary American life, I met a lot of people who loved dogs. I also met a few people who didn’t. One such encounter happened at an RV park in New Mexico. As I walked Casey through the campground one morning, we came upon a young woman in a purple robe cradling a bulging…
  • Newton’s Needle: On Scientific Self-Experimentation

    Benjamin Breen
    24 Jul 2014 | 8:00 am
    “When I close my eyes, they begin to shine, just like the dots and lines,” wrote Czech scientist and former monk Jan Evangelista Purkyně in 1819. “It all ends with a dark rhombus with blunt corners, surrounded by a dull shine resembling a phosphorescent light. A total darkness follows.” This was no hallucination. But it also wasn’t real. Purkyně was describing phosphenes: the glowing colors, pinwheel forms, and vaguely geometric shadows that appear in our field of vision when we press on our closed eyes or stare too long at bright lights. I would wager that virtually everyone…
  • Commercializing the Counterculture: How the Summer Music Festival Went Mainstream

    Cody C. Delistraty
    24 Jul 2014 | 6:00 am
    At the bottom of a dirt path marked by a yellow question mark painted crudely onto a circular piece of wood, a soothing voice can be heard: “The power is in the exhale. Release yourself. Lose yourself.” “Now,” the voice says, “Feel your heart move into your neighbor’s heart. Now bring it back to yourself once more.” It is 1 p.m. at the What the Festival in Dufur, Oregon, and an afternoon session of “Good Times Yoga” is being held in the Illuminated Forest. Trek deeper into the Illuminated Forest and you’ll find a Japanese tea lounge; a makeshift Buddhist temple; and…
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    ProPublica: Articles and Investigations

  • Are Patient Privacy Laws Being Misused to Protect Medical Centers?

    ProPublica
    24 Jul 2014 | 9:30 am
    by Charles Ornstein This story was co-published with NPR's "Shots" blog. In the name of patient privacy, a security guard at a hospital in Springfield, Missouri, threatened a mother with jail for trying to take a photograph of her own son. In the name of patient privacy , a Daytona Beach, Florida, nursing home said it couldn't cooperate with police investigating allegations of a possible rape against one of its residents. In the name of patient privacy, the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs allegedly threatened or retaliated against employees who were trying to blow the whistle on agency…
  • Under Water: The EPA’s Struggle to Combat Pollution

    ProPublica
    24 Jul 2014 | 8:25 am
    by Naveena Sadasivam For years, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency has been frustrated in its efforts to pursue hundreds of cases of water pollution — repeatedly tied up in legal fights about exactly what bodies of water it has the authority to monitor and protect. Efforts in Congress to clarify the EPA's powers have been defeated. And two Supreme Court decisions have done little to decide the question. Most recently, in April, the EPA itself declared what waters were subject to its oversight — developing a joint rule with the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers that…
  • Even After Open Enrollment, Activity Remains Unexpectedly High on Federal Health Insurance Exchange

    ProPublica
    23 Jul 2014 | 2:50 pm
    by Charles Ornstein This story was co-published with NPR's "Shots" blog. For months, journalists and politicians fixated on the number of people signing up for health insurance through the federal exchange created as part of the Affordable Care Act. It turned out that more than 5 million people signed up using Healthcare.gov by April 19, the end of the open-enrollment period. But perhaps more surprising is that, according to federal data released Wednesday to ProPublica, there have been nearly 1 million transactions on the exchange since then. People are allowed to sign up and switch plans…
  • What We Learned Investigating Unpaid Internships

    ProPublica
    23 Jul 2014 | 7:00 am
    by Blair Hickman After a year scrutinizing the intern economy, ProPublica’s internship investigation is coming to an end. But before signing off, we wanted to do our own end-of-semester review. WHAT WE’VE LEARNED Exhaustive data on interns doesn’t exist. Though a handful of research institutes conduct annual internship surveys, the federal government doesn’t track statistics on the intern economy. One recent study found that over half of graduating college seniors had held some type of internship during school. That’s more than double the rate…
  • A Brutal Loss, but an Enduring Conviction

    ProPublica
    22 Jul 2014 | 9:00 am
    by Nikole Hannah-Jones ProPublica
 
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    SixEstate

  • No One Wants to Hear Your Sales Pitch

    George Williams
    21 Jul 2014 | 4:00 am
    Welcome to 2014, a year when the audience is media-savvy and the pace is faster than Speedy Gonzales’. For anyone with a product or message, the potential reach provided by the Internet is like a dangling carrot. The promise of quickly reaching millions is irresistible, which accounts for the deluge of marketing that comes with every online experience. Ad Saturation Do you use Gmail? Then you see ads every time you check your mail. Do you read blogs? Many of them, from large to small, have ads served into the body of their posts, the sidebar, or both. Pop-ups, banner ads, sponsored…
  • The Future of Brand Journalism

    Katie McCaskey
    18 Jul 2014 | 4:00 am
    The Wall Street Journal dedicated an entire section recently to a fascinating premise: “The Future of Everything.” The special report covered diverse industries and personalities (leading thinkers, innovators and artists shared their visions of where the world is heading). Oh, what a world awaits! For Instance: Tony Fadell, founder of Nest Labs, predicted smart appliances and greater connectivity will mean “our relationship with the home will change. The comforts of home will no longer be tied to specific physical structures, giving way to nomadic living.” (I agree.)…
  • Content is King: Embrace the Monarchy

    George Williams
    14 Jul 2014 | 4:00 am
    Content is king. Content is key. Content is indispensable. We’ve all heard this, although many of us are still a bit fuzzy on what it actually means. Today we are going to take a look at online content and how to produce “the good stuff.” Defining Our Terms Wikipedia defines content marketing as follows: Content marketing is any marketing that involves the creation and sharing of media and publishing content in order to acquire customers. This information can be presented in a variety of formats, including news, video, white papers, e-books, infographics, case studies,…
  • Cockroaches, Email Newsletters, and Brand Journalism

    Katie McCaskey
    10 Jul 2014 | 4:00 am
    Email is a 40-year-old technology that is not going away for very good reasons — it’s the cockroach of the Internet. Ouch! Those memorable words came from Jason Hirschhorn, author of the popular, 7-year-old Media ReDef email newsletter. Hirschhorn was quoted in a recent New York Times opinion piece from media columnist David Carr, “For Email Newsletters, a Death Greatly Exaggerated.” Carr traces the on-again, off-again, it’s-complicated relationship that marketers and audiences have with email. On the plus side of the equation: Email, and specifically emailed…
  • My Platform or Yours?

    George Williams
    30 Jun 2014 | 4:00 am
    Content is vital — yeah, we’ve got that. Social media is the best way to propagate good content, which is also axiomatic at this point. It’s been that way for years now, and recently we have been seeing signs of an evolution of that paradigm. Someone Else’s Basket Let’s start with some basic thoughts as a foundation. The big problem with social media has always been that you are putting your eggs into someone else’s basket. While the content you create there is still yours, it is subject to the vagaries of the third-party delivery system (vagaries that…
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    Joe Gullo

  • Ways to Grow Your Following on Google Plus

    Joe Gullo
    23 Jul 2014 | 6:24 am
    Google Plus is an excellent social network to grow your brand and network. While Google Plus isn’t as popular as Facebook or other social networks, it does provide excellent opportunities for search engine optimization (SEO), interactivity, and engagement. Google provided these ways to help grow your following on Google Plus. How are you using Google Plus? The post Ways to Grow Your Following on Google Plus appeared first on Joe Gullo.
  • New Facebook Feature Allows You to Save Content

    Joe Gullo
    22 Jul 2014 | 4:20 pm
    A new Facebook feature allows you to save content like links, places movies, TV, and music. Facebook says only you can see the items you save unless you share them with your friends. To view the items you saved, go to the “more” tab on mobile or by clicking the link on the left hand side of Facebook on the web. Users can also get reminders about the items they saved on the site. How it Works Image by: Facebook The post New Facebook Feature Allows You to Save Content appeared first on Joe Gullo.
  • Don’t Use Social Media to Content Market

    Joe Gullo
    22 Jul 2014 | 6:23 am
    It’s the content, not social media that’s important. When comparing the two and developing digital media strategies they’re actually in two different ballparks. Don’t Use Social Media to Content Market Don’t get sucked into using social media as a way to content market. Content marketing is sharing valuable and relevant content to move a consumer to take action – whether to buy a product/service, vote, comment, etc. Social media has a clear and specific purpose – to communicate with others. Social media doesn’t have an impact on consumer…
  • Israel Defense Force Live-Tweeting Gaza Operation

    Joe Gullo
    20 Jul 2014 | 12:59 pm
    Social media is used in many different ways – communicating, branding, marketing, networking, and now for war? The Israel Defense Force (IDF) is live-tweeting their operations in Gaza. They are also posting information on Facebook. This is nothing new. According to the Atlantic,  Israel has been live-tweeting military events since 2012. Who Do You Sympathize With More Israel or Palestinians?   Source: Pew Research Center The Israeli military is posting battle updates (including photos and videos), and infographics about Operation Protective Edge in Gaza. Twitter has…
  • Reporting Malaysian Flight 17, How Much to Show and Tell?

    Joe Gullo
    18 Jul 2014 | 6:27 pm
    While the world mourns those lost on Malaysian Airlines Flight 17, many journalists and news organizations are debating what and how much of the scene and aftermath to show. Unfortunately, it’s up to the news organization or journalist to decide whether or not to share certain details and share certain images and videos. As journalists our job is to tell a story, but also to recognize that what we post will have an affect on people consuming our stories and the people it directly affects. My personal belief is that if it adds context and meaning to the overall story, no matter how…
 
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    JobsJournalism

  • How to win a Journalism Fellowship: Tips & Warnings before applying

    18 Jul 2014 | 4:11 am
    Media Fellowships are the journalism industry's equivalent of rock bands winning big recording contracts with major labels. It is an incentive professional journalists covet; it makes your record of credentials and achievements heavyweight. Two dimensions of engagement define why fellowships are highly valuable:The entire objective of fellowships appeals to engaging an exceptional set of industrially relevant skills. Meaning, only the best skills get to take down a fellowship.Fellowships appeal to accomplishing goals that are otherwise esoteric and specialized, at least in terms of…
  • Apply for the Inclusive Media-UNDP Fellowships for Journalists 2014

    16 Jul 2014 | 4:59 am
    Journalism fellowships for Indian journalists have been scant for a while.  Nevertheless, here is one you can apply for: the Inclusive Media-United Nations Development Program Fellowship award for 2014 for professional journalists in India.The journalism fellowship is run by Center for the Study of Developing Societies (CSDS) in Delhi and often offers high-profile fellowships for media persons.The Inclusive Media platform is prestigious and enjoys high-retention in the media industry. So, I say, go for it. If you are selected for it, the impetus from such a high-profile platform will…
  • Jargon used in Journalism: How we Cheese Argot in Newsrooms (H to S)

    3 Jun 2014 | 5:24 am
    Journalism Jargon H to S or go to previous A to GHappy Talk: The casual banter between news anchors and other people “on air” is happy talk. In India, it is slightly different: we happy talk a lot on salary days, you see.Jingle: Short piece of music played on radio to identify a regular feature, or program Jumpline or ‘Conti’: A line of type at the bottom of an incomplete newspaper or magazine article that directs the reader to another page where the story is continuedKicker: A few words at the beginning of a headline, top of the introduction to a story, or caption to grab the…
  • Jargon used in Journalism: How we Cheese Argot in Newsrooms (T to Z)

    3 Jun 2014 | 5:22 am
    Journalism Jargon T to Z or go to previous H to STalkback: (a) A type of radio program in which the presenter invites listeners to telephone in and speak on air (b) Two-way intercom equipment by which a radio or television presenter or newsreader in a studio can communicate with producers or directors in a control room. Tease, or Bumpers in broadcast: It refers to materials promoting a story which ‘teases’ the reader or listener by hinting at but not revealing the real story. “Meet the journalist who suffered from a phobia for English. Find out why in the next part of this…
  • Jargon used in Journalism: How we Cheese Argot in Newsrooms

    3 Jun 2014 | 5:13 am
    Journalism, a profession that runs on words, wags a tongue of its own: jargon, slang, gobbledygook and fickle vernacular, and other specialist terminologies. They form a unique linguistic system that could fill a library of glossaries – just to numb the layman. Just keep praying that the specialist newsroom terminology never goes to the printer. The often slangy and obfuscated expressions that journalists across the globe use in newsrooms fulfill a singular function: convenience and uniformity in communicating ideas and clarifying complex technical processes without having to…
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