Journalism

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  • Must-reads of the week

    Columbia Journalism Review
    29 Aug 2014 | 12:45 pm
    Times of India demands employee social media passwords (Quartz) - The company will possess log-in information and will be free to post any material to the account without journalists' knowledge Michael Brown shooting and the crimes journalists choose as newsworthy (CJR) - Examining why black suspects are covered at a greater proportion than they commit crimes Why local media...
  • What could social journalism do for Ferguson?

    BuzzMachine
    Jeff Jarvis
    16 Aug 2014 | 9:37 am
    It took too long, but finally the attention of American journalism turned to Ferguson. Is the crush and focus of network cameras and big-paper reporters helping Ferguson or exploiting its struggle? The answer to that is obvious; see, for example, Newtown. The better, more constructive question is: How could journalism help the residents of Ferguson? The rationale behind our new, proposed M.A. in Social Journalism at CUNY — the thinking behind my argument that journalism must see itself as a service — is that journalism should start by listening, not speaking. It should start with…
  • News Outlet: Karl Rove Twisted Our Reporting For His Anti-Dem Attack Ad

    Media Matters for America - Latest Items
    29 Aug 2014 | 8:12 am
    The Colorado Independent criticized Fox News contributor Karl Rove and his political group for twisting its reporting into a misleading attack on the Affordable Care Act (ACA) and Democratic Sen. Mark Udall. Rove is the co-founder of Crossroads GPS, an IRS 501(c)(4) group that funds attacks against Democratic candidates across the country. The Associated Press reported on August 19 that GPS plans to spend more than $6 million on television ads in Colorado. The group's latest Colorado ad attacks incumbent Sen. Udall for supporting health care reform, with a narrator claiming…
  • Getting Groovy With Reactive Android

    Open
    By MOHIT PANDEY
    18 Aug 2014 | 11:16 am
    “Slow,” a word no one ever wants to see associated with their app. Delay and lag of as little as 100–200 milliseconds will be perceived by users as poor, slow performance. Keeping long running tasks on the main thread will result in that perception, the dreaded “Application Not Responding” (ANR) and a bad user experience. This leaves us developers one choice: concurrent execution of code. The recent growth in popularity of functional programming is well deserved. As things become more asynchronous, the functional model really fits well. Being able to sequence, chain and transform…
  • Daily Must Reads, August 29, 2014

    Mediashift
    Julie Keck
    29 Aug 2014 | 8:46 am
    1. Self-segregation on social networks and the implications for the Ferguson, MO story (Ethan Zuckerman) 2. Chasing clicks: Journalists say one thing but feel pressure to do another (Angèle Christin / Nieman Lab) 3. Want to see Aziz Ansari’s next stand-up show? Check Twitter, then give him your phone number (Peter Kafka / Re/code) 4. Why Mashable centers its video strategy on YouTube (Eric Blattberg / Digiday) 5. Former Times comms chief heads to Alibaba (Joe Pompeo / Capital New York) 6. A map of every device in the world that’s connected to the Internet (Alissa Walker / Gizmodo)…
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    Columbia Journalism Review

  • Must-reads of the week

    29 Aug 2014 | 12:45 pm
    Times of India demands employee social media passwords (Quartz) - The company will possess log-in information and will be free to post any material to the account without journalists' knowledge Michael Brown shooting and the crimes journalists choose as newsworthy (CJR) - Examining why black suspects are covered at a greater proportion than they commit crimes Why local media...
  • Colorado campaign ad spending is still tough to track

    29 Aug 2014 | 9:00 am
    COLORADO SPRINGS, CO -- On a recent Thursday, journalist Sandra Fish was on the campus of Colorado State University in Pueblo giving a talk she's been presenting around the state. Its title: "Tools for Journalists: Following the Colorado Money." There's a lot of money in politics to follow here, and during the campaign season, those dollars fund a lot of...
  • Earthquake 'data' doesn't add up

    29 Aug 2014 | 4:50 am
    On Sunday, the San Jose Mercury-News unveiled the first in a series of stories about how California's foster children are receiving untested behavioral drugs at a way higher rate than children nationwide. The introductory 5,000-word piece -- based on a year of reporting and accompanied by a number of photos, videos, and infographics explaining the issue -- lays the groundwork...
  • GOP-backed fake news sites target Dems in congressional races

    28 Aug 2014 | 12:50 pm
    DETROIT, MI--Deceptive political ads are one thing. But how about deceptive ads that trade on the credibility of journalism? That's what a Republican political group is trying out. This month, the National Republican Congressional Committee debuted at least 20 websites in key congressional districts--from Central Valley, California, to Augusta, Georgia--that are designed, albeit amateurishly, to look like news sites. One...
  • Facebook's war on clickbait unlikely to do much good

    28 Aug 2014 | 9:07 am
    In May, Mike Hudack posted a self-described rant on Facebook about the dismal state of the media, focused as it is so often these days on lowest-common-denominator clickbait. [W]e turn to the Internet for our salvation. We could have gotten it in The Huffington Post but we didn't. We could have gotten it in BuzzFeed, but it turns out that...
 
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    BuzzMachine

  • What could social journalism do for Ferguson?

    Jeff Jarvis
    16 Aug 2014 | 9:37 am
    It took too long, but finally the attention of American journalism turned to Ferguson. Is the crush and focus of network cameras and big-paper reporters helping Ferguson or exploiting its struggle? The answer to that is obvious; see, for example, Newtown. The better, more constructive question is: How could journalism help the residents of Ferguson? The rationale behind our new, proposed M.A. in Social Journalism at CUNY — the thinking behind my argument that journalism must see itself as a service — is that journalism should start by listening, not speaking. It should start with…
  • What society are we building here?

    Jeff Jarvis
    14 Aug 2014 | 5:35 pm
    There is no single solution to the plague of trolls, abusers, harassers, lunatics, imposters, and assholes online any more than there is on earth: no one algorithm, no one company rule, no one regulation will do it all, though they can help. The most powerful weapon in any case is our own norms as a society. What exactly are our norms online? And what are we — you, yes you, and I — doing to establish and enforce our standards as an online society? Anything? Twitter, Facebook, and other platforms bear responsibility. But so do we all. I cannot imagine any civilized being who is not…
  • Unoriginal sin

    Jeff Jarvis
    14 Aug 2014 | 9:42 am
    The amazing Ethan Zuckerman argues at eloquent length in The Atlantic that advertising was the web’s original sin, which really is just a corollary to the contention that giving away content for free on the web (and supporting it with advertising) was newspapers’ and magazines’ original sin. I’m going to disagree. What bothers Ethan, I think, is not advertising but mass media economics — which, I will agree, do not fit on the net. And the solution that preachers against this sin bless — consumer payment — brings with it a host of unintended and…
  • Absolution? Hell, no

    Jeff Jarvis
    11 Aug 2014 | 5:05 am
    The good Reverend David Carr grants us absolution. “So whose fault is it?” he asks after chronicling the excommunication of newspapers and magazines from media companies casting off their old, print ancestors to starve and die. “No one’s,” Carr decrees. Not so fast, preacher. It is our fault. Who else could be at fault? We journalists, publishers, and journalism schools have turned out to be irresponsible stewards of journalism. We squandered our trust and our cash flow. This was was our institution to nurture and protect and Carr says it’s all but dead.
  • Come reinvent TV news

    Jeff Jarvis
    7 Aug 2014 | 2:06 pm
    We’re going to reinvent TV news at CUNY on Sept. 19. Or rather, you will. Do you have a wild vision for what TV news could or should be? Send it our way and you would win $1,000 and present your idea to an audience of TV people and TV disruptors at CUNY’s Graduate School of Journalism on Sept. 19. You’ll be joining some innovators we know and have invited to the event to present their visions for TV’s possibilities: The conditions for everyone: You can’t present anything you’ve already done. You have to show something you (or your organizations)…
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    Media Matters for America - Latest Items

  • News Outlet: Karl Rove Twisted Our Reporting For His Anti-Dem Attack Ad

    29 Aug 2014 | 8:12 am
    The Colorado Independent criticized Fox News contributor Karl Rove and his political group for twisting its reporting into a misleading attack on the Affordable Care Act (ACA) and Democratic Sen. Mark Udall. Rove is the co-founder of Crossroads GPS, an IRS 501(c)(4) group that funds attacks against Democratic candidates across the country. The Associated Press reported on August 19 that GPS plans to spend more than $6 million on television ads in Colorado. The group's latest Colorado ad attacks incumbent Sen. Udall for supporting health care reform, with a narrator claiming…
  • Laura Ingraham Tells Radio Listeners That Obama Considers Them, Not Islamic State, The "True Enemy"

    29 Aug 2014 | 7:56 am
    From the August 29 edition of Courtside Entertainment Group's The Laura Ingraham Show:Previously: AAJA And MPAC Demand Action After Fox Host Advocated For Violence Against MuslimsMuslim Leaders Have Roundly Denounced Islamic State, But Conservative Media Won't Tell You That Laura Ingraham Defies Reality, Suggests Muslim Leaders Haven't Condemned ISIS Violence
  • Fox's Geraldo: Obama Should Encourage American Muslims "To Be Americans First"

    29 Aug 2014 | 7:19 am
    From the August 29 edition of Fox News Fox & Friends: GERALDO RIVERA: I would like the President of the United States to say to Muslim Americans, you are our fellow citizens, we adore you. You are part of the American mosaic. We incorporate you. We extol the virtue of your wonderful religion. But I ask -- me speaking again as the president -- you Imams in the various mosques around the country, to begin preaching American patriotism. Begin spotting these troubled youngsters, disabusing them of the notion that their first loyalty is to jihad…
  • The Foreign Leaders Conservative Media Wish Were In Charge Here

    29 Aug 2014 | 12:32 am
    International incidents are a prime opportunity to daydream about foreign leaders who'd make better presidents than Barack Obama, at least inside the conservative media bubble. David Cameron has now joined Vladimir Putin and Benjamin Netanyahu on the right's list of foreigners they'd rather have in the Oval Office than the man the nation elected. On August 28, President Obama delivered remarks on the U.S. military's approach to the rising terror threat from the Islamic State (also known as ISIS or ISIL) and recent developments in Ukraine. Right-wing media figures responded with disdain,…
  • Chris Wallace Says Fox News Colleague Ben Carson Doesn't Have A "Serious Chance To Be President"

    28 Aug 2014 | 9:02 am
    From the August 28 edition of KFTK's Allman in the Morning:Previously: Inevitable: Fox News Hires Dr. Ben Carson The Fox News Candidate With Nowhere To Run
 
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    Open

  • Getting Groovy With Reactive Android

    By MOHIT PANDEY
    18 Aug 2014 | 11:16 am
    “Slow,” a word no one ever wants to see associated with their app. Delay and lag of as little as 100–200 milliseconds will be perceived by users as poor, slow performance. Keeping long running tasks on the main thread will result in that perception, the dreaded “Application Not Responding” (ANR) and a bad user experience. This leaves us developers one choice: concurrent execution of code. The recent growth in popularity of functional programming is well deserved. As things become more asynchronous, the functional model really fits well. Being able to sequence, chain and transform…
  • Build an Open Source Community Platform With New York Times, Washington Post and Mozilla

    By GREG BARBER
    7 Aug 2014 | 12:18 pm
    Each year, Knight-Mozilla OpenNews selects developers, technologists, civic hackers and data crunchers to spend 10 months working as fellows embedded in their partner newsrooms. Fellowships are paid positions, and emphasize open source development that strengthens specific newsrooms and the larger journalism-code community. The search for the 2015 Knight-Mozilla Fellows is now open, and the deadline for applications is Aug. 16, 2014. Staffers from The New York Times, Mozilla OpenNews and The Washington Post are seeking two fellows to join their community platform collaboration. This is their…
  • EMR Streaming in Go

    By JP ROBINSON
    10 Jul 2014 | 8:38 am
    On our platform teams, we use Amazon’s Elastic MapReduce (EMR) service to help us gather useful metrics from log files. We have processes that capture log files, then compress and push them to Amazon S3 for archiving. This pattern builds up massive amounts of information going back several years and, thanks to EMR, it’s all available to us for data crunching. Initially, we used Python for a lot of the heavy lifting, but over time we came to rely on Go. In the Beginning When we first started using EMR, my team wrote the mapper and reducer scripts in Python. We chose Python because it…
  • Improving Article Accessibility

    By CLINT FISHER
    24 Jun 2014 | 8:38 am
    With the redesign and replatform of NYTimes.com in January, we introduced many new features on our article pages. Unfortunately, for our users with disabilities who rely on assistive technology, the new features hindered usability. Before the article redesign, most of our assistive technology users went to our print preview version, which contained only the article text, to avoid having their screen readers interrupted by content outside of the flow of the article. By removing the print preview feature (the redesign allowed us to leverage the print capabilities of modern browsers to improve…
  • Scoop: A Glimpse Into the NYTimes CMS

    By LUKE VNENCHAK
    17 Jun 2014 | 11:15 am
    You know the importance of technology to the future of journalism has become a widely accepted fact when a prominent editor decides to join a new company because of its content management system. That’s what Ezra Klein told The New York Times about his decision to leave The Washington Post for Vox Media, a digital publisher with a fancy, custom-built CMS. Klein couldn’t quite describe what made the Vox system so special, but the fact that a journalist said he loved, let alone even tolerated, his CMS was all you needed to know that the world has changed. Suddenly, the CMS, an often derided…
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    Mediashift

  • Daily Must Reads, August 29, 2014

    Julie Keck
    29 Aug 2014 | 8:46 am
    1. Self-segregation on social networks and the implications for the Ferguson, MO story (Ethan Zuckerman) 2. Chasing clicks: Journalists say one thing but feel pressure to do another (Angèle Christin / Nieman Lab) 3. Want to see Aziz Ansari’s next stand-up show? Check Twitter, then give him your phone number (Peter Kafka / Re/code) 4. Why Mashable centers its video strategy on YouTube (Eric Blattberg / Digiday) 5. Former Times comms chief heads to Alibaba (Joe Pompeo / Capital New York) 6. A map of every device in the world that’s connected to the Internet (Alissa Walker / Gizmodo)…
  • Mediatwits #128: How Blended Learning Fits into the Future of Education

    Fannie Cohen
    29 Aug 2014 | 3:05 am
    Blended learning is a hybrid mix of online and in-class teaching intended to boost student engagement and bring learning into the 21st century. This method encourages collaboration, discussion and in-person learning in lieu of the traditional lecture format. Teachers integrate technology into the course with online management systems such as Blackboard or Moodle, which provide video lectures, supporting materials, peer messaging and real-time tracking of student progress. Advocates claim the mix of face-to-face and virtual learning better prepares students for their post-collegiate careers.
  • Flip Your Classroom and Your Attitude

    Mark E. Johnson
    29 Aug 2014 | 3:00 am
    Click the image for a full listing of series posts. (Image courtesy of Flickr user DeclanTM) You’re neither a dusty old prof sliding acetates onto a projector nor are you all revved up for a full MOOC. You’re just you, wanting to be a little better, hoping to engage your students in a new way or free up a little face time for talking. It’s time to start flipping. MOOC? Flipping? Lost already? MOOCs, or massive open online courses, are all the rage. You essentially build a course, trickle it out in digital pieces over several weeks, let the students coach themselves through discussion…
  • Upcoming Events in Digital Media: Aug. 29 Edition

    Angela Washeck
    29 Aug 2014 | 3:00 am
    Each week, MediaShift posts an ongoing list of upcoming events in the digital media and journalism world. These will be a mix of MediaShift-produced events and other events. If we’re missing any major events, please use our Contact Form to let us know, and we’ll add them to the list. If you’d like to pay to promote your event in the “featured event” spot of our weekly post, use the Contact Form to let us know. Also, be sure to sign up for our Events email newsletter to get notifications about future MediaShift events. Featured Event of the Week Collab/Space Chicago…
  • Futures Lab Update #72: Making Sharable Content at BuzzFeed

    Reuben Stern
    29 Aug 2014 | 3:00 am
    This week we visit BuzzFeed to find out how the staff creates Internet-friendly content that ricochets across social media. Launched in 2006 as an experiment in making things go viral, BuzzFeed has since ballooned into a media empire that will continue expanding thanks to another $50 million in outside investment. The site attracts millions of visitors every month by offering reported news combined with an array of Internet-friendly material like quizzes, lists and other pop-culture-related fare. In this report, Managing Editorial Director Summer Anne Burton talks about the human side of…
 
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    Newspaper Death Watch

  • The Bots are Coming!

    Paul Gillin
    5 Aug 2014 | 9:04 am
    On one level we can understand the teeth-gnashing that follow the Associated Press’ announcement that it plans to start using robots to write the majority of U.S. corporate earnings stories. Robots seem to bring out the Luddite in all of us. What we can’t understand is why anyone outside of a few shop stewards should want to preserve the jobs that will invariably be lost to this new kind of automation. Actually, the AP says no jobs will be eliminated. “This is about using technology to free journalists to do more journalism and less data processing, not about eliminating jobs,” wrote…
  • What if The New York Times Went Weekly?

    Paul Gillin
    6 Jul 2014 | 6:50 am
    Steve Outing The leaked “innovation” report from The New York Times that made the rounds in May recommends that the company take more risks, move more quickly and consider radical steps to reinvent itself. Steve Outing wonders what would happen if the Times abandoned daily print editions, and he’s built an elaborate “what-if?” model to test the idea. Outing’s model doesn’t answer the question, but it does provide a new tool with which to evaluate options. “Most news companies aren’t very good at grokking what’s coming at them or…
  • Across the Globe, Newspaper Industry is Actually Growing

    Paul Gillin
    17 Jun 2014 | 1:31 pm
    Observers of the cratering newspaper industries in the US and Europe may be surprised at this news: Print newspaper circulation around the world actually increased 2% in 2013 compared to 2012. The pocket of strength comes from rapidly maturing economies in Asia and Latin America, where people who a generation ago might have used newspapers mainly for kindling are now finding them to be valuable for the purposes for which they were intended. That’s the highlights from the latest World Press Trends survey, which was released last by the World Association of Newspapers and News Publishers. The…
  • A Graphical View of Newspaper Innovation

    Paul Gillin
    29 May 2014 | 3:33 am
    The Newspaper Association of America (NAA) was in denial during the early years of the industry’s crash, but lately the organization has been doing good work to highlight the new spirit of innovation that is taking hold across its membership. As the numbers in this infographic demonstrate, U.S. newspapers have a lot to be proud of. They reached 145 million unique visitors in January alone and the Washington Post and New York Times each drove more than a quarter-million tweets each week. One of the things we like most about this infographic is the attribution. Go to the page on the NAA…
  • The New York Times Gives Itself a Good Thrashing

    Paul Gillin
    19 May 2014 | 11:02 am
    A speech in The New York Times newsroom after the announcement of the 2009 Pulitzer Prize winners (Photo credit: Wikipedia) We finally got a chance to read through the 96-page “Innovation” report commissioned by the management of The New York Times and leaked last week in the wake of the firing of Executive Editor Jill Abramson on Tuesday. Joshua Benton at Nieman Journalism Lab has already called the report “one of the most remarkable documents” he’s seen in his tenure, and detailed coverage has appeared on BuzzFeed, Mashable and numerous other outlets. We won’t go into detail…
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    JackLail.com

  • Evolving is a painful process

    Jack Lail
    17 Aug 2014 | 10:20 am
    For many, working at a newspaper doesn't seem all that fun anymore. Chas Sisk had had enough. The Tennessean had just fired Sisk and the entire staff of the paper the day before and asked them to reapply for their jobs. The reorganization was announced in the paper by executive editor Stefanie Murray as a "bold step forward in our evolution." The Nashville Scene
  • The old and the new

    Jack Lail
    1 Aug 2014 | 2:08 pm
    The old knoxnews (a design in use for just over seven years) and the new design, launched July 22, 2014. The old site was on the "Ellington" platform; the new one uses "Endplay." What's up with the German ads? We use a screenshot service whose ip addresses are in Germany. (Click on the image for a larger view.)
  • Good reads on the large life of John Seigenthaler

    Jack Lail
    12 Jul 2014 | 5:56 pm
    (Journalists John Quinn and John Seigenthaler chatting at the First Amendment Center in Nashville, Tennessee, in 2010.) Some good pieces on the large life of John Seigenthaler New York Times: John Seigenthaler, Editor and Aide to Politicians, Dies at 86 Ken Paulson (in USA Today): Seigenthaler a champion of First Amendment The Tennessean: John Seigenthaler, longtime Tennessean editor, dies at 86 NPR: Newspaper Editor, Activist John Seigenthaler Dies At 86 Poynter: John Seigenthaler was a leader of free speech, civil rights and journalism Nashville Scene: Remembering the late John…
  • Reaction to the death of John Seigenthaler

    Jack Lail
    11 Jul 2014 | 7:05 pm
    [View the story "Reaction to John Seigenthaler's death" on Storify]
  • Another year, another year older

    Jack Lail
    16 May 2014 | 12:50 pm
    Researcher Greg Harmon of Borrell Associates says the average age of a print newspaper reader is 57 and the average newspaper web visitor is 51.  Saying the industry's aging demographics ought to have "everyone's hair on fire," Harmon notes that newspaper readers have been getting a year older every year for more than a decade.  -- Alan D. Mutter
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    sans serif

  • ‘Being a South Indian, his Hindi was immaculate’

    churumuri
    18 Aug 2014 | 5:34 am
    sans serif records the demise of J.V. Raman, the Delhi University economics professor who read the news in Hindi, on Doordarshan, back in the days when the state-owned channel was the only TV news vehicle. Mr Raman taught at the capital’s Rajdhani College, whose website proudly records that he was among the college teachers associated with the media. A blog post on Doordarshan’s newsreaders recorded Mr Raman thus: “Let’s now come to some male Hindi newsreaders. And the most iconic of them would be J V Raman. Being a South Indian, his Hindi was immaculate. Thick…
  • Why NaMo shouldn’t take media on foreign trips

    churumuri
    13 Aug 2014 | 10:51 pm
    Prime Minister Manmohan Singh addresses the media on the way back home from the United States in October 2013. There were 34 journalists on that junket. As Indian journalists come to terms with a Narendra Modi dispensation that doesn’t want to court them or take them on foreign junkets, K.P. Nayar, the former Washington correspondent of The Telegraph, Calcutta, writes that the US administration is no better. Each correspondent who accompanied US president Barack Obama on his trip to India had to shell out $8,400 (approximately Rs 500,000) in air fare, plus an additional $2,500 (Rs…
  • India’s first woman journalist Vidya Munshi, RIP

    churumuri
    9 Jul 2014 | 4:59 am
    sans serif records the demise of Vidya Munshi, arguably India’s first woman journalist, in Calcutta on Monday, 7 July 2014.  She was 94 years old. Born in Bombay, she worked in several newspapers and magazines, including a ten-year stint with Russy Karanjia‘s Blitz. A 2006 profile of Ms Munshi in The Telegraph, Calcutta, noted: “At that time (1952-62), she was the Calcutta correspondent of Blitz, a Bombay weekly critical of government policies and excelling in investigative journalism. “One of her ‘scoops’ was on two Canadian pilots who were to fly from Hong Kong…
  • In ‘The Last Mag’, Nishant Patel is Fareed Zakaria

    churumuri
    2 Jul 2014 | 4:45 am
    DILIP CHAWARE writes from New Jersey: The Last Magazine is Michael Hastings’s novel which has been published a year after his death. This controversial young journalist, who worked for Newsweek as a war correspondent, died last year in a car accident in Los Angeles when he was just 33. Very few were aware about this book, which was resurrected from his laptop. The novel, though, is a portrayal of real life within a major news organisation, the nexus between the government and the media and broadly discusses the relevance and future of the print medium. Hastings is back in the news owing to…
  • A rash I&B ministry “advisory” to TV, print media

    churumuri
    26 Jun 2014 | 4:05 am
    When he was health minister in the UPA’s first term, Anbumani Ramadoss made it mandatory for movies and TV channels to show the statutory warning against smoking and drinking each time someone on screen lit a cigarette or sipped a drink. The Telegraph reports that the NDA’s information and broadcasting ministry under Prakash Javadekar has shot off an “advisory” to TV stations and newspapers “against portraying or “glorifying” rash or dangerous driving, as well as helmet-less riding and a failure to fasten car seatbelts.” “All TV channels/ Doordarshan/…
 
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    JackLail.com

  • Evolving is a painful process

    Jack Lail
    17 Aug 2014 | 10:20 am
    For many, working at a newspaper doesn't seem all that fun anymore. Chas Sisk had had enough. The Tennessean had just fired Sisk and the entire staff of the paper the day before and asked them to reapply for their jobs. The reorganization was announced in the paper by executive editor Stefanie Murray as a "bold step forward in our evolution." The Nashville Scene
  • The old and the new

    Jack Lail
    1 Aug 2014 | 2:08 pm
    The old knoxnews (a design in use for just over seven years) and the new design, launched July 22, 2014. The old site was on the "Ellington" platform; the new one uses "Endplay." What's up with the German ads? We use a screenshot service whose ip addresses are in Germany. (Click on the image for a larger view.)
  • Good reads on the large life of John Seigenthaler

    Jack Lail
    12 Jul 2014 | 5:56 pm
    (Journalists John Quinn and John Seigenthaler chatting at the First Amendment Center in Nashville, Tennessee, in 2010.) Some good pieces on the large life of John Seigenthaler New York Times: John Seigenthaler, Editor and Aide to Politicians, Dies at 86 Ken Paulson (in USA Today): Seigenthaler a champion of First Amendment The Tennessean: John Seigenthaler, longtime Tennessean editor, dies at 86 NPR: Newspaper Editor, Activist John Seigenthaler Dies At 86 Poynter: John Seigenthaler was a leader of free speech, civil rights and journalism Nashville Scene: Remembering the late John…
  • Reaction to the death of John Seigenthaler

    Jack Lail
    11 Jul 2014 | 7:05 pm
    [View the story "Reaction to John Seigenthaler's death" on Storify]
  • Another year, another year older

    Jack Lail
    16 May 2014 | 12:50 pm
    Researcher Greg Harmon of Borrell Associates says the average age of a print newspaper reader is 57 and the average newspaper web visitor is 51.  Saying the industry's aging demographics ought to have "everyone's hair on fire," Harmon notes that newspaper readers have been getting a year older every year for more than a decade.  -- Alan D. Mutter
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    Technology

  • How solar-powered windows could change the world

    Chris Owen
    27 Aug 2014 | 3:40 am
    The term "game-changing" is a cliché, especially in technology and innovation circles, but the latest developments from Michigan State University have the potential to completely overhaul a multitude of commercial and industrial markets. The university has announced the creation of transparent solar panels – effectively windows that do the same job as the carbuncular, shiny [...]
  • Most British jihadis are dumb thrill-seekers, not holy warriors; don't glorify them with Prevent

    Jamie Bartlett
    26 Aug 2014 | 1:31 am
    Prevention is better than cure, right? Of course it is. Especially when it comes to terrorism. Far better to prevent the spread of support for groups like al-Qaeda or, now, Islamic State (IS). That’s the thinking behind "Prevent", the strand of the UK’s counter-terrorism strategy that aims to stop terrorism before it occurs. It’s based [...]
  • Why terrorists like Isil will always be one step ahead of us

    Jamie Bartlett
    22 Aug 2014 | 2:50 am
    “I’m using Facebook to target various nationalist-related groups and inviting every single member [to become a my Facebook friend] … aaaaarrrrggh:/ It’s driving me nuts, lol”, wrote Anders Breivik in his rambling 1,516-page manifesto 2083: A European Declaration of Independence. "Ofc, it’s a quite tedious task," he admitted, "but then again, I can’t think of [...]
  • The Ice Bucket Challenge – a middle-class wet-T-shirt contest for armchair clicktivists

    Willard Foxton
    21 Aug 2014 | 4:36 am
    In the latest baffling social media trend, middle-class twonks are pouring buckets of iced water over themselves and filming it as part of an incredibly successful charity fund-raising meme called “the ALS icebucket challenge”. The idea is you pour the bucket of water over yourself, and then challenge two friends to do the same while [...]
  • Government IT projects fail because of politicians, not programmers

    Willard Foxton
    19 Aug 2014 | 5:13 am
      Yesterday, the American company Ratheon was awarded £224 million of British taxpayers' money for a disastrous Home Office IT project called e-Borders. That £224 million represents less than half the total bill of the project, which was scrapped last year. I thought I had lost my capacity to be shocked by IT projects going [...]
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    Idea Lab

  • Key Questions to Ask When Planning Your Next News Event

    Josh Stearns
    29 Aug 2014 | 3:00 am
    This post originally appeared on the Local News Lab. The American Press Institute just published a terrific report with lessons from nearly 20 news organizations who are building their event strategy. If your newsroom is interested in face-to-face community engagement and exploring events as a new revenue stream, the report is a must read. The report is organized around six key lessons: Use assets you already have Leverage existing audiences and grow new ones. Identify and hold off competition. Take creative approaches. Weigh the value of different pricing strategies. Go all-in with…
  • Speech Recognition for Media: It’s Not All About Accuracy

    Emily Saltz
    26 Aug 2014 | 3:00 am
    Speech-to-text software has gotten pretty mainstream these days. The most common use is voice commands, especially with mobile devices. Many smartphone owners have had the experience of articulating hostilely into a 1-millimeter smartphone microphone, trying — and expecting — to be understood. While there are still enough voice command errors to inspire sites like whysiriwhy.com (with bloopers like “sushi” becoming “slushy”), at the end of the day, you can probably still dictate what time you’re coming home for dinner without too much trouble. Less charted…
  • How Matter Leverages the Community to Help Entrepreneurs Think Bigger

    Lara Ortiz-Luis
    21 Aug 2014 | 3:00 am
    I joined Matter, the startup accelerator backed by the Knight Foundation, PRX and KQED, in January of this year. At the time, it was 13 weeks into the 20-week program for Matter’s second cohort of media-related startups, “Matter Two.” With only five weeks to Demo Day, I got my feet wet right away and started planning Matter Two’s last design review. The Matter Program Timeline (Click to view full size) This was my initial understanding of design reviews: Design reviews (“DRs”) mark the end of each four-week sprint of the 20-week accelerator program. They are a chance for…
  • Can a Laser-Cut Vegetable Tell a Story About Food Security?

    Rahul Bhargava
    20 Aug 2014 | 3:00 am
    Can a vegetable tell a story about food access in Somerville? Yep. “70% of Somerville Public School students receive free or reduced lunch” – laser-cut onto a cucumber. In public settings, it can be quite hard to get folks walking by interested in a data-driven argument about your cause. We often argue that a creative data sculpture can grab their attention. Like maybe a vegetable laser cut with some data about food security! We’ve worked with the Somerville Food Security Coalition a few times, including for our first data mural pilot project! Recently, we had a chance to come…
  • 5 Tips for Better Collaboration on Media Tech Projects

    Nicole Zhu
    12 Aug 2014 | 3:00 am
    This post originally appeared on Northwestern University Knight Lab’s blog. With code sometimes you have to run before you can walk. Tutorials and W3Schools are great for learning the basics, but at some point you just have to open a blank window in Sublime Text, focus on a project and start writing code from scratch. If you’re like me and aren’t a disciplined runner, it can be hard to keep up the momentum when working on your own. Having teammates keeps you on track and pushes you to work through roadblocks. That said working with others comes with its own set of challenges. In the…
 
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    Daniel Sato

  • Using Time Machine to back up an external drive

    Daniel Sato
    26 Aug 2014 | 8:02 pm
    Whether you are working with thousands of photos, hours of video or semesters of lesson plans, securing and backing up your data remains critically important. If you have all of your data stored on the hard drive in your computer, this can be as easy as plugging in an external drive and setting up Time Machine (on a Mac). More likely, if you work with a lot of photos and video like I do, you have most of your data on an external drive. In an ideal world, you would back these up using some sort of Network Attached Storage RAID array. Coming from a newspaper environment, I know this isn’t…
  • Journalist turned academic technology evangelist

    Daniel Sato
    25 Aug 2014 | 7:31 pm
    Earlier in the week, I looked back on my time in journalism. Today, I am looking ahead to the opportunities and challenges that await me in academia. For the past seven years, I have moved from state to state (and sometimes country to country) telling stories through the lens of my camera. Last Monday, I began my new role as multimedia specialist in the Academic Technology department at Rowan University School of Osteopathic Medicine. While the two positions seem unrelated initially, as a digital first journalist, I have been providing my own form of technology support for reporters and…
  • Creating an automated yearbook using InDesign and Excel

    Daniel Sato
    24 Aug 2014 | 10:15 pm
    Last Monday, I began my new job as a multimedia specialist at Rowan University’s School of Osteopathic Medicine. One of the benefits of coming in to a new job is that you see get to look at the various tasks being done with fresh eyes. One such area was in the yearbooks that media services makes for each incoming class. Early on, class sizes were small, and it was possible to lay out each yearbook one by one in Microsoft Word. However, with the 2018 class growing beyond 150 students, formatting each student’s photo, name, degree, university, specialty and hobbies quickly became…
  • Nobody needs another “Why I left journalism” post …

    Daniel Sato
    24 Aug 2014 | 1:21 pm
    A week ago Friday, I had my last day at The News Journal. Walking out of the newsroom for the last time after four years was definitely strange, but I know that they will continue to do the kind of work that helps to shape public opinion and public policy. In the past four years, I’ve had the privilege to cover crime in Wilmington, the University of Delaware women’s basketball team as they progressed through the NCAA tournament, the 2013 inauguration of President Barack Obama and the passage of marriage equality in the state. I’ve also been able to follow stories as the…
  • Adding graphics to non-visual stories

    Daniel Sato
    14 Mar 2013 | 6:51 pm
    It can be easy to get stuck in a rut creatively. As a videographer/photographer, I know what my editors like, and shooting to their tastes can ultimately save me time. However, doing so means that I am not challenging myself and making sure that I am growing as a journalist and artist. More than anything, #turbovideo training was a much needed wake-up call to challenge myself and see what new skills I can learn and how to apply those skills to my work. One such challenge was to work harder to find graphically interesting ways to present non-visual stories in video. While it is nice to think…
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    Reflections of a Newsosaur

  • How digital retailing could roil local media

    Newsosaur
    13 Aug 2014 | 5:00 am
    Thanks to the growing ubiquity of mobile devices, a digital revolution is about to transform bricks-and-mortar retailing – a fast-breaking phenomenon that potentially poses the biggest challenge yet to the economics of local media companies.  More than four out of five smartphone and tablet owners use their devices for shopping, according to a report issued earlier this year by the Nielsen
  • Are newspapers doomed? It depends.

    Newsosaur
    7 Aug 2014 | 1:12 pm
    Now that every major media company has dumped or soon will jettison its print division, the question I hear every day is: Are newspapers doomed? The answer is neither simple nor universal. But the dramatic and traumatic contraction of the newspaper industry in the last decade suggests that the business models, publishing platforms and journalistic conventions that seemed so stable and certain a
  • Robots could do better than some journalists

    Newsosaur
    22 Jul 2014 | 3:17 pm
    When the Associated Press announced plans to use computers to write corporate earnings stories, a number of journalists asked me if I was as horrified by the prospect as they were.  In fact, I think robots could do better than some reporters. With all respect and affection for my fellow journalists, I have concluded that a well-programmed set of algorithms can be far more analytic and
  • The newspaper crisis, by the numbers

    Newsosaur
    16 Jul 2014 | 5:00 am
    Roughly a decade after the commercial debut of the Internet, America’s newspapers posted record high advertising sales of $49.4 billion in 2005, leading many publishers to think their businesses would not be seriously affected by the digital revolution. But they were wrong.   Since hitting that high note in 2005, the industry has undergone a dramatic and traumatic contraction, losing nearly
  • Newspapers can’t merely dabble at digital

    Newsosaur
    10 Jul 2014 | 5:00 am
    The New York Times wrote the story in 1853 about how Solomon Northup was kidnapped and sold into slavery, but Gawker got most of the page views by publicizing the archived article when “12 Years a Slave” won the Oscar for best picture in 2014.  This example of how the Times fails to capitalize on its rich content to build digital readership, relevance and revenues came to light in the leak
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    20 headlines from the reading list

  • An ill five-year old, his family and the state—an unfolding story of Ashya King and journalism's role

    1 Sep 2014 | 7:07 am
  • Grading the Media on Ferguson Coverage

    29 Aug 2014 | 8:00 am
    http://player.theplatform.com/p/BCY3OC/FdyDRHtFeBqI/embed/select/TeQj5UlHzmH5?form=html Slideshow via Urbandaily.com Now that the Ferguson protests are slowly beginning to wind down, it’s likely a good time to assess how the media handled the coverage of the recent unrest, triggered by the police shooting of unarmed teen, Michael Brown. From the coverage I’ve seen myself, I would have to grade the media a C to C-, mainly for coverage that I thought was uneven, at best, with some national reporters even crossing journalistic lines to become advocates, rather than unbiased, objective…
  • Media Internships Don’t Lead to Jobs. So What?

    29 Aug 2014 | 6:00 am
    We all know internships are the best way to get a job in media, right? Er, not so much, according to this interactive chart via LinkedIn. The research doesn’t even delve into the issues of paying interns or what, if anything, you can get from working in digital media. If you scroll down and click through the Media/Entertainment category you’ll see that: In Sports, Publishing, and Media Production, there are lots of internships available (as any job board search will show) but very few actually turn into full time positions. If you want to get into broadcast as a journalist,…
  • 3 Takeaways From the Knight News Challenge ‘Lessons Learned’ Report

    28 Aug 2014 | 9:10 am
    The Knight News Challenge released a report this week on “Lessons Learned,” from past projects. The report, completed in a collaboration with Arabella Advisors, uses survey and interview data with 2010-2011 winners and is a great resource for anyone looking to submit a proposal for the next challenge — or anyone thinking of starting a news focused project in their newsroom. Some takeaways: 1) Figure out what kind of manpower you need. You can mix full time staff with volunteers, but you definitely need a dedicated, paid, group of people to be focused on the project all of…
  • "The average story about the Ice Bucket Challenge was much more heavily promoted by Facebook’s..."

    28 Aug 2014 | 7:10 am
    “The average story about the Ice Bucket Challenge was much more heavily promoted by Facebook’s algorithms (a factor of 8x) than the average story about Ferguson.” - Self segregation on social-networks and the implications for the ferguson MO story - Ethan Zuckerman.  (via algopop)
 
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    Poynter. » MediaWire

  • Journalists are losing access, but the public still expects the story

    Butch Ward
    1 Sep 2014 | 6:49 am
    This weekend, Florida International University opened its 2014 football season at home in Miami against Bethune-Cookman University. The game was close, ending when FIU fumbled a field goal attempt that would have won the game as time ran out. Pretty good game, I’m guessing. But I’m only going on the six paragraphs that ran on the Miami Herald’s website under a byline: “From Miami Herald Wire Services.” The Herald decided not to cover the game. Why? Because FIU refused to give a press pass to the Herald’s FIU beat reporter, David J. Neal. In a statement issued Saturday and placed…
  • Today in media history: ‘The Workingmen’s Picnic’ and other early Labor Day reports

    David Shedden
    1 Sep 2014 | 4:00 am
    What was the news coverage like for the first Labor Day celebrations? The Library of Congress and its “Chronicling America” collection gives us some newspaper examples and this description of the first parade: On September 5, 1882, some 10,000 workers assembled in New York City to participate in America’s first Labor Day parade. After marching from City Hall, past reviewing stands in Union Square, and then uptown to 42nd Street, the workers and their families gathered in Wendel’s Elm Park for a picnic, concert, and speeches. This first Labor Day celebration was eagerly…
  • A&E Networks purchase stake in Vice Media

    Benjamin Mullin
    29 Aug 2014 | 11:09 am
    The Hollywood Reporter | New York Times | The Huffington Post | Financial Times | A&E Networks will pay $250 million for a 10 percent stake in Vice Media, a deal that values the company at 2.5 billion, Paul Bond wrote in The Hollywood Reporter Friday. Earlier in the day, Time Warner dropped its bid to purchase a stake in Vice Media, a deal reportedly fell through because the two companies could not agree how much Vice Media was worth, Jonathan Mahler wrote for The New York Times. He wrote one possible outcome for the deal might have included giving Vice control of HLN, a network…
  • Intercept redesign shows article pageview counter

    Benjamin Mullin
    29 Aug 2014 | 9:02 am
    The Intercept The Intercept debuted a new look Friday, shrinking its navigation bar, adding a pageview counter and reconfiguring the homepage layout. The new design allows readers to see more content — one prominent story and four secondary stories — without having to scroll. Here’s a look at the transformation: Before: After: The new icon next to the tally of comments for each story indicates how many pageviews the article received. The new feature is meant to help readers choose between stories, said John Cook, editor-in-chief at the Intercept.   “Gawker publishes…
  • Overworked and overwhelmed? Consider these 7 questions

    Jill Geisler
    29 Aug 2014 | 9:00 am
    If you’re feeling swamped at work these days, you’re not alone. I’m not talking “I don’t get to go out for lunch very often” busy. I mean “I’m buried in work, never fully off the clock and still feel I’m letting people down” busy. I hear it regularly from the managers I teach and coach. It’s a function of the downsized staffing but increased demands and responsibilities in changing organizations. The story is familiar: to hit budget numbers, the company cuts head count but leaves fully intact the expectation of quality, service…
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    SeanBlanda.com

  • The Rise of Content-First Startup

    Blanda
    27 Aug 2014 | 5:59 pm
    Most content websites have the same problem: They’ve assembled an audience. Paying for it? Well, that’s another story. Startups have the reverse problem: they have a product they need to sell immediately, but no audience. As a result we’ve seen startups having robust blogs or newsletter arms that drive that is then given something to buy. I wrote about this collision of journalism and everything else in 2011, and at the time, it was unclear whether this plan would, you know, work. But I think we’re past the stage of “if” a content-first startup isa viable…
  • What I Learned Launching a Print Magazine

    Blanda
    21 Aug 2014 | 6:00 pm
    As news sites continue to grapple for revenue opportunities, a few have returned the familiar ground of print (like Pando, Model View Culture, Grantland, Contently, The Great Discontent, and others). There’s a rising trend of sites that are using online content to build an audience that they turn into a subscriber list which they then charge to send a curated printed product. At 99U we’ve spent the majority of 2014 experimenting with this dynamic. The result is the 99U Quarterly, which is (at least at first) only available to people who have attended the 99U Conference. We…
  • Pretty Much Everything I Know About the News Business

    Blanda
    16 Mar 2014 | 5:00 am
    This was first published on Medium here. Last month, venture capitalist Marc Andreessen posted what, in his view, was the future of the news business. Reactions were varied, but everyone had one. I joked that my entire Twitter stream was people replying to Andreessen as he has very publicly thrown himself into the future of news conversation. We need new voices in this discussion like Andreessen, but his post was too… nice. I’d bet he left his more candid insights out. After the post, I found myself wishing someone would share more actionable observations from the industry. So,…
  • AxisPhilly, The William Penn Foundation, and “Old Philadelphia”

    Blanda
    12 Aug 2013 | 5:01 pm
    On July 11, Philadelphia’s AxisPhilly, a public affairs news site bankrolled by the William Penn Foundation parted ways with its CEO Neil Budde, a move which will likely lead to the site being shuttered or significantly downsized. I no longer live in Philadelphia and am no longer involved in the day-to-day operations of its media community via Technically Philly, but the news of Budde’s departure left me a mix of angry, upset, and frustrated. Why? The Inquirer/Daily News/Philly.com ownership group has changed hands several times while executing a series of perplexing business…
  • The Introversion Bubble

    Blanda
    19 Apr 2013 | 6:17 pm
    This post was originally published on Medium. Recently, I attended a conference alone. When it came to the conference’s opening night cocktail hour, I was a bit nervous. I knew none of the attendees, and nobody wants to be the person standing alone at a party, fiddling around on their phone pretending to answer email. After exploring the hotel lobby, I dutifully made the rounds, introducing myself to folks at the bar, folks in mid-conversation around the space, and people catching fresh air outside. Tired, I sat down at a nearby table. Seated there were three women, ten to fifteen years…
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    Media Disruptus

  • Future of news scenarios show what’s (likely) to happen with newspapers

    Steve Outing
    6 Aug 2014 | 2:50 pm
    What will happen to the newspaper industry in the next half decade? No One In the World can accurately predict one future for newspapers, or even for one specific newspaper. But we can reasonably determine what are the most likely, plausible 5-year-out futures. As part of my continuing series of demonstrating and applying Foresight methods...
  • Predict future news events with web data

    Steve Outing
    15 Jul 2014 | 2:56 pm
    Is it possible to know the future? In general, the answer is a resounding “No!” But in certain instances, tools are emerging to predict what might happen in the near future with high probability. This kind of knowledge — say, that civil unrest and violence is likely to erupt in a specific country within the...
  • Start at the end: How ‘backcasting’ might save investigative journalism

    Steve Outing
    9 Jul 2014 | 9:30 am
    Wouldn’t it be wonderful? If we could envision a desirable future and make it happen. Is that possible? … Well, sort of. I encourage the news/media industries and journalism educators to give it a try. This is the second of my series to demonstrate the many tools and methods of strategic foresight (a.k.a., futures studies),...
  • How to measure the value of news content: How about based on reader action?

    Steve Outing
    26 Jun 2014 | 3:58 pm
    “What is the best way to measure meaningful content?” … That’s the prompt for June’s Carnival of Journalism, a monthly blog-fest where journalism experts and aficionados answer a common question, and the result is a brain dump usually representing lots of diversity and wisdom. Carnival proprietor David Cohn has a rule for participants: “No apologies.”...
  • What if? … The NY Times ended its daily print edition

    Steve Outing
    3 Jun 2014 | 4:09 pm
    Stop the presses! (For 6 days a week!) … Yes, I’m being serious. The recent New York Times “Innovation” report, a meant-to-be-internal strategy document proposing a (long-overdue) digital-first future for what is arguably the best newspaper and digital news operation on the planet, painted a depressing picture. Despite beefing up its digital business and creating...
 
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    Teaching Online Journalism

  • The coming death of print newspapers

    Mindy McAdams
    24 Aug 2014 | 7:47 am
    Say you’re a journalist now working for a newspaper. You know your job is anything but secure. I asked several reporters, editors, and scholars what journalists should do to get ready for the next wave of firings. There were three strong consensus answers: first, get good at understanding and presenting data. Second, understand how social media can work as a newsroom tool. Third, get whatever newsroom experience you can working in teams, and in launching new things. That’s from Clay Shirky, writing in Last Call: The end of the printed newspaper. He goes on to explain those three…
  • Setting up a private WordPress.com blog for group editing

    Mindy McAdams
    15 Jun 2014 | 8:16 am
    When you have a free WordPress.com blog, you can make it private, limiting it to only people you select. You can also allow multiple authors, editors, or a mix of roles on a free WordPress.com blog, whether it is private or public. Here’s what I learned by setting up a private blog that gave editing privileges to several users: It was easy to make it private: Dashboard > Settings > Reading — find and tick “I would like my site to be private, visible only to users I choose.” It was easy to add new users and assign “roles” to them: Dashboard >…
  • Journalism education: There is no spoon

    Mindy McAdams
    10 Jun 2014 | 9:03 am
    At a journalism education conference in Canada recently, it appears media economics scholar Robert Picard gave a stirring keynote address. Stirring as in “stir things up!” He began by reminding the audience that journalism and the media environment today are vastly different from what they were in the previous century. I’d say the decline began in 1995 and became undeniably apparent around 2008, when job losses in the newspaper industry first spiked. Of course, you know this. But probably you take it for granted. Probably, like most journalism educators, you have not really…
  • Teaching online journalism in South Africa

    Mindy McAdams
    14 May 2014 | 2:22 am
    Thanks to an invitation from the School of Journalism and Media Studies at Rhodes University, I was awarded a Mellon Scholar-in-Residence fellowship. I’ve been in Grahamstown, South Africa, since May 30. Here are some things I have learned so far. Journalism education A journalism degree here can take three years or four. A student must apply to be accepted for a fourth year. Others go straight into newsrooms after the third year. The academic year begins in February, after the long summer break (December and January). They have four terms, with two terms constituting a semester. At the…
  • (Re)defining multimedia journalism

    Mindy McAdams
    19 Apr 2014 | 9:23 am
    I published a post on Medium.com 11 days ago. The title is (Re)defining multimedia journalism. I thought it would be interesting to publish it there, instead of here, on my own blog, and see what would happen. Medium has this nice graph with options to see how many people viewed my post, or how many people READ my post. (I don’t have that option in WordPress.) I also get to see how many people recommended my post (and who they are), and the percentage of readers out of viewers. I feel good that 992 people read my post, but not so good that only 37 percent who viewed it actually read it.
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    Evolving Newsroom

  • “If you can’t protect it, don’t collect it”

    Julie Starr
    31 Aug 2014 | 4:41 pm
    The recent theft of the personal data of 4.5 million patients of a US hospital chain prompted Bloomberg to look at the Top 10 Data Breaches of all time. In their story, they wrote: The recent attack has gained notoriety for its methods, rather than its size — the hacking group has been prolific in attacking U.S. medical-device companies and drug makers. The chart below shows how the Chinese breach compares with others. The ranking provides little solace if you’re one of the people whose personal information was stolen and used for identity theft. Yet, with security-software maker…
  • Bookmarks for August 30, 2014

    Julie Starr
    30 Aug 2014 | 12:02 am
    Google’s Self-Driving Cars Still Face Many Obstacles | MIT Technology Review  Impressive progress hides major limitations of Google’s quest for automated driving. New Statesman | Crowdfunding is doomed – there are too many fingers in too many apple pies Some guy in some 0.1-horse town in the ass-end of America’s great nowhere put up a crowdfunding appeal on the web: “I want to bake an apple pie for my mom but I don’t have the money to do it.” A couple of days later there was $49,000 in his bank account. I like to think he’ll now bake many, many apple pies and deliver them…
  • Google launches Project Wing – deliveries by self-flying vehicles

    Julie Starr
    29 Aug 2014 | 8:41 pm
    Google has launched Project Wing – deliveries made by self-flying vehicles. The project’s at an early stage and Google is looking for partners to take the idea further. The video shows dog biscuits being delivered to an outback farm in Australia. The post Google launches Project Wing – deliveries by self-flying vehicles appeared first on Evolving Newsroom.
  • Bookmarks for August 29, 2014

    Julie Starr
    28 Aug 2014 | 1:57 pm
    Intel reveals world’s smallest wireless modem for the Internet of things | VentureBeat | Gadgets | by Dean Takahashi Small 3G modems are a necessary part of connecting sensors, wearables, and industrial equipment. Australia follows EU, US in allowing mobile devices in-flight Passengers on Qantas and Virgin Australia from Tuesday will be allowed to use mobile electronic devices in-flight with limited restrictions after a relaxation of the rules by the country’s aviation authority. Most smartphone users download zero apps per month – Quartz Mobile apps have skyrocketed in…
  • New Zealand statistics to be released in September 2014

    Julie Starr
    26 Aug 2014 | 5:34 pm
    Here are the releases Statistics NZ has planned for September (2014) – in case you want to diary anything of interest. ♣ Subscribe to media email alerts from Statistics NZ 1 Sep 14 Overseas Trade Indexes (Prices): June 2014 quarter (provisional) – M 1 Sep 14 Overseas Trade Indexes (Volumes): June 2014 quarter (provisional) – M 2 Sep 14 —— 3 Sep 14 Value of Building Work Put in Place: June 2014 quarter – M 4 Sep 14 —— 5 Sep 14 Wholesale Trade Survey: June 2014 quarter 8 Sep 14 Economic Survey of Manufacturing: June 2014 quarter – M 9 Sep 14 Electronic Card…
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    LOCAL ONLINER

  • 40th Speaker Added for SMB Digital Marketing, Sept. 22-24, New Orleans

    Peter
    28 Aug 2014 | 4:16 pm
    The lineup for our SMB Digital Marketing event in rockin’ New Orleans has got to be considered one of our strongest ever. We’ve just confirmed our 40th hand picked speakers for the event, which takes place Sept. 22-24 in New Orleans. In addition to SMB leaders who have previously announced (i.e. from Google, Facebook, Sprint, YP, Yelp, ReachLocal, Acxiom, Groupon, NOLA Media Group, Mercury Payments and more), we have now confirmed a great set of additional SMB leaders — each driving the local SMB space in new ways. These include: Mike Deluca, SVP, Hearst; CEO, Local Edge Del…
  • Watch Out AAA: Urgent.ly Goes Uber, Takes on Roadside Assistance

    Peter
    26 Aug 2014 | 2:58 pm
    “Uber-ification” has been extended to many local segments, including hotels, restaurant reservations and promotions. How about roadside assistance? Asserting that AAA and other roadside assistance services have outdated economic models and technology, local media and commerce vet Chris Spanos (AOL, Repair.com and Seniorchecked.com ) is leading a team launching Urgent.ly. The Washington D.C.- area company, which provides flat-rate repair truck assistance rather than charging annual insurance-like fees (i.e. $99), has done hundreds of service calls and is set to go nationwide. It…
  • Empty Seats at Lunch? Mogl Launches Time of Day Promotions

    Peter
    18 Aug 2014 | 1:38 pm
    Loyalty programs offering cash back or other rewards make a lot of sense for merchants – until it is 7:30 pm on Friday, and the loyalty program is still giving 20 percent back even though it is prime time for the restaurant. Mogl, the San Diego-based loyalty firm now working with over 1,000 restaurants in Southern California, San Francisco and Phoenix, thinks it has solved the problem. Since June, the company — which has raised $25 million and set to initiate a new round — has been rolling out a new version that lets restaurants choose the amount of cash-back based on time of…
  • Gannett’s Deal for Cars.com

    Peter
    6 Aug 2014 | 5:22 pm
    In a move that shows a deep commitment to the future of classified/vertical advertising, Gannett has announced it will buy out its newspaper partners in Cars.com and take sole possession of the #2 car site (which trails only Cox’s AutoTrader in the online auto marketplace.) It will pay heartily to do so, paying $1.8 billion for the 73% stake of Cars.com that it doesn’t already own. That sets a value for Cars.com of $2.5 billion — an impressive amount, but still $500 million less than what the highest estimates called for. An “economic event” around Cars.com and its sister…
  • First Data Bets on Virtual Gift Cards to Drive Local Commerce

    Peter
    30 Jul 2014 | 10:18 am
    Gift cards have been growing astronomically and now make up an industry nearing $100 billion in revenues. You’ll see racks of cards for national brands and retailers everywhere, from Safeway to Bed, Bath & Beyond. But can local merchants get in the loop? We’ve seen gift card activity increase in travel, spa & salon and hospitality. Most of these are sold in person or on web sites. And a second question: can they go virtual, with gift cards stored in e-wallets and easily bought, sold and transacted via mobile phone? While the industry is relatively nascent, Mercator Advisory…
 
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    yelvington.com

  • Something to think about on Labor Day

    yelvington
    1 Sep 2014 | 6:52 am
    What happens when your job is automated out of existence? "Knowledge workers" have imagined themselves immune, but machine learning changes everything. It is great that technology lifts the yoke of labor from humanity. It's not so great when humanity is left with nothing. In our economic system, the benefits of such change do not accrue to the freed labor. We may need to rethink that.
  • Traditional American values

    yelvington
    4 Jul 2014 | 8:49 am
    It is the Fourth of July, Independence Day in the United States, a day when we dress up in red/white/blue outfits, eat hot dogs and barbecue, and set off small explosives. It also is a day for pontificating about what it is to be an American. We don't really need a special day for that, as we now are in a state of continuous political campaigning and under a barrage of propaganda from our "deregulated" broadcasting industry. But a comment that I saw the other day about how we need to return to "traditional American values" is stuck in my head, so I am going to do a bit of pontificating of my…
  • The episode in which I cause the sky to fall on journalism as we know it

    yelvington
    18 Apr 2014 | 12:05 pm
    I was part of a panel discussion of metrics and analytics in the newsroom a couple of weeks ago at the Journalism Interactive conference at the University of Maryland. I approached the subject with some trepidation. Some journalists are resistant to the very idea of measurement, often downright innumerate, and sometimes hostile to any idea that doesn't lead us all back into the honey and clover of the 1980s, before the Internet came along and turned it all into snakes and bees. But I was heartened to find that the room was full of people who were clearly very interested in the subject and…
  • Milepost 20

    yelvington
    2 Apr 2014 | 9:53 am
    I passed another milepost yesterday. April 1 was my 20th anniversary in digital media. I moved from the print newsroom of the Star Tribune on April 1, 1994, found a desk in the tech office, and started noodling on a website prototype on a Mac Quadra. The Web in those days was primitive and the Internet in general was barely out from under "acceptable use policies" that forbade commercial activity. There were no authoring tools. Web browsers couldn't even do tables, so layout was out of the question. Within a month or so we made a decision to skip the Web and build on a commercial online…
  • Spotted gets a new framework

    yelvington
    5 Mar 2014 | 12:02 pm
    Back in the last decade we created a community photo-sharing platform called Spotted. The original idea was borrowed from a simple, successful content/marketing program at Cox Interactive Media, where I was executive editor at the turn of the century. We sent someone with a digital camera to an event with instructions to turn around and shoot the spectators, and hand out business cards. The resulting slideshows were huge traffic generators. At Morris, this was merged with the "anyone can post" philosophy of Flickr and eventually implemented as a Morris DigitalWorks tool that became a…
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    News

  • Nominate A Peer For NPPA's Awards, Recognition

    2094
    29 Aug 2014 | 7:15 am
    Since the inaugural Joseph A. Sprague Memorial Award was given by the National Press Photographers Association in 1949, the organization has annually recognized individuals for their special contributions to both the NPPA and the wider field of visual journalism. 
  • Nominations Open For Two NPPA Board Seats, Officers In Five Regions

    2094
    23 Aug 2014 | 7:52 pm
    The National Press Photographers Association is accepting nominations for candidates for its board of directors and regional officers until September 30, NPPA national secretary Michael P. King announced today.
  • NPPA's Lawyer Requests Investigation Into Ferguson Police Gun-Pointing Incident

    2094
    20 Aug 2014 | 4:45 pm
    The lawyer for the National Press Photographers Association who is on the ground in Ferguson alongside photojournalists has just filed a formal letter of complaint, as well as a request for an official investigation, into the "unlawful and unprofessional activities" of a uniformed and armed police officer who pulled his gun on a photographer.
  • Photojournalist James Foley Executed By ISIS On Video

    2094
    19 Aug 2014 | 3:03 pm
    A video posted online today by The Islamic State in Iraq and Syria (ISIS) shows a militant in the act of beheading American freelance photojournalist James W. Foley.
  • NPPA Protests Ferguson Police Tactics, Disrespect For Constitutional Rights

    2094
    14 Aug 2014 | 9:30 am
    Today the National Press Photographers Association sent a strong letter of protest to the Ferguson, MO, chief of police regarding the unwarranted arrest and detention of journalists who are coving the town's unfolding national story, as well as the department's "complete lack of understanding an respect for the First Amendment."
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    Online Journalism Blog

  • Hyperlocal Voices: Geraldine Durrant, East Grinstead Online

    Damian Radcliffe
    28 Aug 2014 | 1:38 am
    For the latest in our series of Hyperlocal Voices Damian Radcliffe heads back home to Sussex. Geraldine Durrant,  Editor of East Grinstead Online, explains how the site – ‘an idea whose time had come’ – serves the popular market town. Launched just four months ago, East Grinstead Online is already generating substantial traffic, and publishes multiple stories every day. Here’s their story… 1.  Who were the people behind the blog? I have been a journalist all my working life, and many years ago was news editor of the local paid-for paper. I moved on as Group…
  • FAQ: Do you need new ethics for computational journalism?

    Paul Bradshaw
    16 Aug 2014 | 12:55 am
    This latest post in the FAQ series answers questions posed by a student in Belgium regarding ethics and data journalism. Q: Do ethical issues in the practice of computational journalism differ from those of “traditional” journalism? No, I don’t think they do particularly – any more than ethics in journalism differ from ethics in life in general. However, as in journalism versus life, there are areas which attract more attention because they are the places we find the most conflict between different ethical demands. For example, the tension between public interest and an…
  • Verifying video and other information – crowdsourcing site Bellingcat now open

    Paul Bradshaw
    13 Aug 2014 | 6:08 am
    The crowdsourcing site Bellingcat – whose posts were previously only visible to donors – is now completely open. The site, launched by conflict blogger Eliot Higgins (better known as Brown Moses), has successfully raised almost £50,000 through Kickstarter while performing a significant role in verifying information about crashed flight MH17. But alongside its news and resources (including case studies) the site also includes a section of ‘How-To’s which are particularly useful for any journalist dealing with information online. These currently include: A…
  • Transfer rumours, robot journalism and The Guardian: when it makes sense to put a poll BEFORE the article

    Paul Bradshaw
    7 Aug 2014 | 5:33 am
    Nice work by The Guardian (above) in their online reporting on transfer rumours: readers of each report are presented with a vote on whether they think the rumour is likely to be true before they get to read the full article. It’s a good example of putting interactivity – and distribution – front and centre when the headline has already done most of the editorial work. It’s also a good example of making the most of editorial content which is inherently social: transfer rumours are the sort of conversational fodder people buy newspapers for. Not only does this…
  • So Google scans email for dodgy images – should we be worried about scanning for sensitive documents?

    Paul Bradshaw
    6 Aug 2014 | 11:41 am
    You could be forgiven for not having heard of John Henry Skillern. The 41 year old is facing charges of possession and promotion of child pornography after Google detected images of child abuse on his Gmail account. Because of his case we now know that Google “proactively scours hundreds of millions of email accounts” for certain images. The technology has raised some privacy concerns which have been largely brushed aside because, well, it’s child pornography. Sky’s technology correspondent Tom Cheshire, for example, doesn’t think it is an invasion of…
 
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    Common Sense Journalism

  • FOIA: PACER, federal courts' records site, deleting old records

    Doug Fisher
    31 Aug 2014 | 8:55 am
    Such are the perils of the digital age and our collective memory. The one thing that should be available for a very long time, the nation's court records, are now being deleted in some jurisdictions from the federal courts' PACER database.(We can have a long discussion later about whether court records delivered digitally should be charged the usurious price of 8 cents a page.)Together with efforts to broaden expungement of criminal records in some states, I fear we every so steadily are being overtaken by the philosophy of presentism, a dangerous thing.
  • SC FOIA: Score one for us

    Doug Fisher
    28 Aug 2014 | 11:27 am
    After the recent freedom of information setbacks in South Carolina, media lawyer Jay Bender points out a new state Supreme Court ruling that puts some teeth into the law's 15-day rule and gives us a tool to at least force agencies to make a quick determination on whether records are open.The records still do not have to be produced within 15 days, but by requiring a final determination, it opens the route to be able to quickly move to the courts to adjudicate any adverse agency opinions that records are not open. (And it opens the possibility of attorney's fees.)But then, sigh, there's this…
  • Impressive work by Charleston Post and Courier

    Doug Fisher
    21 Aug 2014 | 5:16 am
    The Post and Courier in Charleston has started running an investigation into domestic violence against women in South Carolina.It's nice work , and you should read it.My only reservation is technical -- the paper has tended to "snowfall" this a bit, and I'm not sure it is the best technique for a public policy story like this. The legislative part of it tends to get lost toward the bottom, and it also kind of gets in the way of a more general thread of telling women's stories, which works better integrally as a long-form narrative.That the Legislature so far has resisted most changes  is…
  • FOIA: Call for grassroots effort in SC

    Doug Fisher
    21 Aug 2014 | 5:04 am
    Don Kausler, regional editor of the Morning News in Florence, has taken up the call that changing SC's wounded Freedom of Information Act has got to be a full-time, concerted effort in which we get the public involved, not just a one-of Sunshine Week effort.
  • RIP: Dan Lynch

    Doug Fisher
    19 Aug 2014 | 6:13 am
    Sad news from Fort Wayne that former Journal Gazette editorial cartoonist Dan Lynch has died.Dan was on staff when I got there and was genuinely a fun guy to work with. He trundled off to Kansas City for a stint and Steve Sack, now in Minneapolis, took his spot for a bit.But Dan returned to the Fort Wayne fold, poking fun at the city and its pols (which is kind of like shooting fish in a barrel), until a stroke sidelined him in 2001. I always liked his clean and to the point style.  I hope I still have in my files a couple of Dan's drawings that he graciously shared. Dan and his work…
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    CyberJournalist.net

  • "The average story about the Ice Bucket Challenge was much more heavily promoted by Facebook’s..."

    28 Aug 2014 | 7:10 am
    “The average story about the Ice Bucket Challenge was much more heavily promoted by Facebook’s algorithms (a factor of 8x) than the average story about Ferguson.” - Self segregation on social-networks and the implications for the ferguson MO story - Ethan Zuckerman.  (via algopop)
  • thisistheverge: The Rise and Fall and Rise of Virtual...

    28 Aug 2014 | 7:10 am
    thisistheverge: The Rise and Fall and Rise of Virtual Reality In the wake of Facebook’s purchase of Oculus VR, can this revolutionary technology triumph anew?
  • paleymediacouncil: Quote of the Day: Animal Politico Founder...

    26 Aug 2014 | 10:44 am
    paleymediacouncil: Quote of the Day: Animal Politico Founder and President Daniel Eilemberg crushes the myth of objectivity in journalism at the Media Council last year. Full video of the Next Big Thing in Hispanic Media can be viewed here. 
  • laughingsquid: Hyperlapse, An App by Instagram for Shooting...

    26 Aug 2014 | 10:44 am
    laughingsquid: Hyperlapse, An App by Instagram for Shooting Time-Lapse Videos
  • fastcompany: As Stephen Colbert or any great satirist will tell...

    22 Aug 2014 | 1:50 pm
    fastcompany: As Stephen Colbert or any great satirist will tell you, a key to satire is to always stay in character. In The Onion’s case, that “character” is an absurd, alternative world invented to comment on the real one. Every aspect of the fake world has to ring true for the trick to work. That includes the visuals. When nothing you publish is real, every single image has to be made from scratch. “We want to make sure that we’re making our Onion-world fully realized and very real,” says Ben Berkley, managing editor of The Onion. It’s all in service of the joke. Read…
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    The Newspaper Guild

  • Kaiser Foundation Grant Helps Chicago Trib Cover Obamacare

    Janelle
    29 Aug 2014 | 8:13 am
    Robert FederAugust 29, 2014RobertFeder.comA $30,000 grant from Kaiser Health News, part of the Kaiser Family Foundation, is helping defray the salary of a Chicago Tribune reporter covering Obamacare. Wes Venteicher, who’d been a TribLocal suburban reporter since June 2013, recently shifted to the Chicago Tribune consumer watchdog and investigative reporting team as a full-time reporter covering the Affordable Care Act and consumer health issues. The Tribune is one of at least six major newspapers across the country to receive funding from the nonprofit Kaiser news organization, which says…
  • Wyoming, Iowa Court Rulings are First Amendment Victories

    Janelle
    29 Aug 2014 | 7:40 am
    Lena WilliamsAugust 29, 2014NewsGuild-CWA State courts in Iowa and Wyoming this month have upheld the media’s right to open court proceedings and to photograph court cases. The rulings, though local in scope, are major First Amendment victories for journalists and media organizations. The Wyoming Supreme Court ruled Aug. 12 that an Eighth Judicial Court judge “erred” when he closed the courtroom and sealed the court file in a 2012 sexual assault case involving a juvenile victim. As the media sought information, the court went so far as to deny the existence of the case file. Circuit…
  • GlobalPost Staff: What James Foley Meant to Us

    Janelle
    28 Aug 2014 | 10:11 am
    David CaseAugust 28, 2014GlobalPostWhy would he do it? Why would he put his life at risk? Why would he subject his adoring friends and family to the anguish of knowing he could end up dead — especially after he had come so close to it already? In Jim’s case, it was about altruism, about telling the stories that needed to be told. In the words of Bishop Peter A. Libasci who spoke at his memorial service, Jim risked his life “so that we may open our eyes.” He was appalled by the suffering across the Middle East, and particularly in Syria, where many thousands had died by the time he…
  • 'We're Living in a Golden Age of Investigative Journalism'

    Janelle
    27 Aug 2014 | 9:43 am
    Anya SchiffrinAugust 27, 2014The Nation In our world, the news about the news is often grim. Newspapers are shrinking, folding up, or being cut loose by their parent companies. Layoffs are up and staffs are down. That investigative reporter who covered the state capitol—she’s not there anymore. Newspapers like the Los Angeles Times, the Washington Post, and the Chicago Tribune have suffered from multiple rounds of layoffs over the years.  But despite a long run of journalistic tough times, the loss of advertising dollars, and the challenge of the Internet, there’s been a blossoming of…
  • Business School Dean Wonders Why Unions Get a Bad Rap

    Janelle
    27 Aug 2014 | 8:43 am
    John T. DelaneyAugust 27, 2014Huffington PostIn a Labor Day column honoring workers, University of Pittsburgh business school Dean John T. Delaney wonders why more of them don't understand the value of unions. "It is not unusual for faculty in business schools and other university programs, such as economics and hospitality management, to suggest that unions are 'bad,' despite the extreme inequality that didn't exist in the United States when unions were strong, Delaney writes. Yet, "unions have failed to generate political support to change labor laws in ways that would help workers and…
 
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    OUPblog » Media

  • Publishing tips from a journal editor: selecting the right journal

    MAlvarez
    17 Aug 2014 | 3:30 am
    One of the most common questions that scholars confront is trying to find the right journal for their research papers. When I go to conferences, often I am asked: “How do I know if Political Analysis is the right journal for my work?” This is an important question, in particular for junior scholars who don’t have a lot of publishing experience — and for scholars who are nearing important milestones (like contract renewal, tenure, and promotion). In a publishing world where it may take months for an author to receive an initial decision from a journal, and then many…
  • Technologies of sexiness

    Elizabeth Gorney
    10 Aug 2014 | 3:30 am
    What does it mean for a woman to “feel sexy”? In our current consumer culture, the idea of achieving sexiness is all-pervasive: an expectation of contemporary femininity, wrapped up in objects ranging from underwear, shoes, sex toys, and erotic novels. Particular celebrities and “sex symbol” icons, ranging throughout the decades, are said to embody it: Marilyn Monroe, Brigitte Bardot, Farrah Fawcett, Madonna, Sharon Stone, Pamela Anderson, Kim Kardashian, Miley Cyrus, Megan Fox. Ways of achieving sexiness are suggested by new sex experts, confidence and self-esteem…
  • My client’s online presence

    Elizabeth Gorney
    9 Aug 2014 | 5:30 am
    Social media and other technologies have changed how we communicate. Consider how we coordinate events and contact our friends and family members today, versus how we did it 20 or 30 years ago. Today, we often text, email, or communicate through social media more frequently than we phone or get together in person. Now contrast that with psychotherapy, which is still about two people getting together in a room and talking. Certainly, technology has changed psychotherapy. There are now apps for mental health issues. There are virtual reality treatments. Psychotherapy can now be provided through…
  • Youth and the new media: what next?

    Elizabeth Gorney
    8 Aug 2014 | 4:30 am
    Now that the Internet has been with us for over 25 years, what are we to make of all the concerns about how this new medium is affecting us, especially the young digital natives who know more about how to maneuver in this space than most adults? Although it is true that various novel media platforms have invaded households in the United States, many researchers still focus on the harms that the “old” media of television and movies still have on youth. The effects of advertising on promoting the obesity epidemic highlight how so much of those messages are directed to children and…
  • A decade of change: producing books in a digital world

    Julia Callaway
    4 Aug 2014 | 3:30 am
    It may be hard for some of us here at Oxford University Press to imagine a life without Oxford Scholarship Online (OSO), but even though it has reached the grand old age of 10 years old, it is still only a baby in comparison with some of our other venerable institutions. For example, the Oxford English Dictionary first published in 1884, 130 years ago, and the Oxford Almanack 340 years ago in 1674; even our celebrated duck pond is almost 200 years old. OUP employees in our Great Clarendon Street building are used to bumping into history in the most unexpected corners; my most recent find has…
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    Blogposts | The Guardian

  • US Open 2014: Andy Murray v Jo-Wilfried Tsonga live!

    Tim Hill in New York
    1 Sep 2014 | 12:56 pm
    Mens singles fourth round Game-by-game coverageEmail: tim.hill@theguardian.comTwitter: @timmyhilleh 3.56pm ET Tsonga* 5-7 4-3 Murray (*denotes next server)Murrays using his drop shot increasingly often: probably a good tactic in the heat. Tsonga takes Murray to 40-30, but the Scot produces a forehand winner of rare quality. Game Murray. 3.51pm ET Tsonga 5-7 4-2 *Murray (*denotes next server) Its been a good game, really positive, but its worth noting that Tsonga has made 22 unforced errors so far; Murray just nine. What did we say earlier? But Tsonga looks more comfortable executing his shots…
  • Transfer deadline day: Radamel Falcao, Daley Blind and Danny Welbeck moves live!

    Jacob Steinberg (7-11am) Michael Butler (11am-1pm), Barry Glendenning (1-3pm) and Nick Ames (3pm-7pm) John Ashdown (the gold run)
    1 Sep 2014 | 12:45 pm
    Transfer window latest before the deadline at 11pm BSTRadamel Falcao to join Manchester United on seasons loanAjax confirm the transfer of Daley Blind to Old TraffordInteractive: see how much Premier League clubs have spentAnd feel free to email john.ashdown@theguardian.com 8.45pm BST Crystal Palace have completed the signing of Zeki Fryers from Tottenham on a three-year deal. Tottenham incurred the wrath of Sir Alex Ferguson when signing the full-back, but it hasnt really worked out for him at White Hart Lane. At all. 8.41pm BST Hull City have been very busy today, breaking their transfer…
  • A global economy divided into the good, the bad and the ugly

    Phillip Inman
    1 Sep 2014 | 11:19 am
    Poor data from eurozone and Japan comes as investors bet on European Central Bank moving closer to quantitative easingThe global economy is divided at the moment into the good, the bad and the ugly. Two of the most populous nations can claim to be good. The US is growing and since business investment has taken off an important factor delayed by Washington infighting over the Sequester and budget deficit the economy looks like it is rebalancing nicely. And India saw its manufacturing output chalk up the 10th straight month of expansion in August.China ranks among the bad after its vast…
  • Cameron announces anti-terror measures in Commons statement as it happened

    Andrew Sparrow
    1 Sep 2014 | 10:52 am
    Lunchtime summaryJohn Bercow backs down over Commons clerk appointmentCamerons statement - Snap summary and analysisAfternoon summary 6.37pm BST Clearly most people would be revolted at the idea of British nationals who have been over to Syria or Iraq to fight coming back to this country, but if they are British nationals, and the Queens subjects, there is nothing to prevent them doing so. They may well have committed serious criminal offences; they should be arrested at the airport and put on trial. But if the government is trying to change what is a very basic principle of our common law,…
  • Europe's terrible trans rights record: will Denmark's new law spark change?

    Emine Saner
    1 Sep 2014 | 10:24 am
    Denmark has become the first European country to allow legal change of gender without a medical expert statement. Why are clinical diagnosis and surgery still insisted upon elsewhere?In one leap, Denmark has changed its law on trans rights, taking it from a country where transgender people were forced to undergo sterilisation in order to be legally recognised as a different gender, to one of the most progressive countries on the issue in the world.Unlike in most of the countries that allow new gender recognition, trans people in Denmark now do not even need a medical expert statement, but can…
 
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    blog maverick

  • Another interview about streaming media from 1999

    CyberDust ID - Blogmaverick
    24 Aug 2014 | 7:35 pm
    As I clean up or find old emails for whatever reason, its always interesting to run across old interviews I did about the future of streaming media.  This interview was with Kevin Werbach who along with Esther Dyson wrote one of the leading newsletters of the time. Here is the entire email, the good and the bad At 02:48 PM 8/9/99 -0400, Kevin Werbach wrote: Thanks for your message.  I’ll definitely be in touch when I put the piece together (probably either September or October), as your perspective would be very helpful. The primary question I’m asking is how streaming video…
  • The 6 Things You Need to Know to be Great in Business

    CyberDust ID - Blogmaverick
    16 Aug 2014 | 11:22 pm
    There are no shortcuts in business.  In order to be successful there are some things that you must know.  These are not all of them by a long shot, but IMHO they are 6 of the most important   1. Know how to sell. Selling means being able to convey why your product or service, which may be you if you are looking for a job,  will make things better. Selling is never about convincing. It is always about helping. 2. Put yourself in the shoes of your customer If you know how to put the person you are dealing with in a position to succeed, you can be successful. In order to do this, you…
  • AEREO – Everything Old is New Again

    CyberDust ID - Blogmaverick
    19 Jul 2014 | 4:30 pm
    AEREO deserves a lot of credit for their effort.  It was a long and expensive shot to do what they went for.  But they went for it.  And they attempted to pivot after their SCOTUS loss. I was watching with interest, because it is something we had examined 15 years ago at Broadcast.com The technology has obviously gotten better on all sides of the equation, but sometimes a good idea is a good idea. Even if it is hard to make work.  This is from January of 2000. What is fascinating is the alliances and attempts that were being made or considered.   We also did the same kind of work to…
  • The Idiots Guide to High Frequency Trading

    CyberDust ID - Blogmaverick
    3 Apr 2014 | 1:28 pm
    First, let me say what you read here is going to be wrong in several ways.  HFT covers such a wide path of trading that different parties participate or are impacted in different ways. I wanted to put this out there as a starting point . Hopefully the comments will help further educate us all 1.  Electronic trading is part of HFT, but not all electronic trading is high frequency trading. Trading equities and other financial instruments has been around for a long time.  it is Electronic Trading that has lead to far smaller spreads and lower actual trading costs from your broker.  Very…
  • High Frequency Trading, and Proof that the SEC Approach to Insider Trading is Completely Wrong

    CyberDust ID - Blogmaverick
    2 Apr 2014 | 7:05 am
    Got to love Mary Jo White, the Chairwoman of the SEC.  While Michael Lewis’s book Flash Boys was getting all the headlines and was the topic of some of the best television  on CNBC, ever, Ms White used the firestorm to ask for more money for the SEC. Shocking ? The only shock would be if she didn’t use any occasion the SEC was in the public eye to ask for more money. It is unfortunate because there is no greater waste of money than what the SEC spends trying to enforce  insider trading laws. Let me give you some examples of just how poorly the SEC manages our tax dollars when…
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    One Man and His Blog

  • Journalism needs better tools

    Adam Tinworth
    1 Sep 2014 | 3:43 am
    Om Malik: If technology has upended the media ecosystem, then it should also be the solution for that ecosystem to adapt to the new hyper-speed reality of news and information. What we need is a set of tools that basically are a way to help the information-gathering process at network speed. Instead of reporters asking questions — if you don’t have historical context you can’t really ask some key questions — we need tools that help augment the process. Right now, we're not even good at the publishing end tools, let alone the research end ones. That has to change.
  • Maria Popova of Brain Pickings on attention and journalism

    Adam Tinworth
    1 Sep 2014 | 3:09 am
    Here's a fascinating interview with Maria Popova, curator of the truly excellent Brain Pickings blog. Some choice highlights: I can’t speak for others, but I’ve found in myself a tendency to retreat deeper and deeper into my existing interests as a form of self-defense against the abundance of demands for my time and attention. Again, it takes a certain discipline not to do that and to continually expand one’s ideological comfort zone, as it does not to scatter oneself too chaotically across a multitude of diversion. And, on journalism, this: Every nonfiction writer is…
  • Gawker plumbs the Facebook traffic valley

    Adam Tinworth
    1 Sep 2014 | 2:50 am
    Another reminder of the dangers of building your business on one company's platform: Those are Gawker's figures - and why did that valley happen? Read and his co-workers think that this is the result of some algorithm changes Facebook made in May. But just like everyone else on the Web who doesn’t work at 1 Hacker Way, they can only guess at what those changes are. Even when Facebook announces it is making changes, it doesn’t do a whole lot to explain what it’s really doing and why. Previously: Surviving the Facebook clickbait algorithm change
  • Over a quarter of a million social media gurus

    Adam Tinworth
    30 Aug 2014 | 3:38 pm
    Social media gurus are breeding like rabbits roaches: The June 2014 What’s Next Blog social media guru Twitter Bio list (researched on FollowerWonk) has grown to epic proportions. The list now tops 297,897 – up from a mere 16,000 when we first started tracking them in 2009. Well over a quarter of a million people are self-declaring themselves as social media experts on Twitter now. Pause. Consider that. Despair for humanity. Here's why you should immediately discount anyone who describes themselves in this way: no-one is a social media expert. This is a new field, and a dynamic…
  • Serving the Twitter Elite

    Adam Tinworth
    27 Aug 2014 | 4:24 am
    Twitter: Similar to how we help businesses make advertising simple and effective on Twitter, we occasionally build features that enable these public figures — verified users — to engage more easily with the world through Twitter. Interesting to see Twitter developing an effective Elite, with tools and services the rest of us don't have access to. The Blue Tick Elite seems to be mapping pretty closely to to existing media power strutters, too. It's the big media, celebrities, and their ilk. From disruptive to assimilated?
 
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    The American Prospect

  • Labor's New Groove: Taking the Struggle From Streets to Legislatures at the Twilight of Collective Bargaining

    Harold Meyerson
    1 Sep 2014 | 6:31 am
    (AP Photo/Paul Beaty) Demonstrators rally for better wages outside a McDonald's restaurant in Chicago, Thursday, Dec. 5, 2013. Demonstrations planned in 100 cities are part of push by labor unions, worker advocacy groups and Democrats to raise the federal minimum wage of $7.25. Labor Day, 2014, comes at a time when Americans have concluded—correctly—that their country is downwardly mobile. In a Rutgers University poll released last week, 71 percent of Americans said they believed the changes to the economy caused by the Great Recession are permanent. (Asked the same question in November…
  • Why the Legacy of Katrina on New Orleans Is Different From Disasters That Befell Other Cities

    Courtney Young
    29 Aug 2014 | 9:40 am
    Rescue personnel search from victims as they traverse the New Orleans 8th Ward in the flooded city of New Orleans on Tuesday, Aug. 30, 2005. Water continued to rise after the onslaught of Hurricane Katrina, which pounded the coast on August 29. How to remember Hurricane Katrina? I consider this each year as the anniversary approaches. I assume it’s something that most people do when the anniversary of a traumatic event draws near. New Orleans is not my hometown; I grew up two hours northwest from it in Louisiana’s fourth largest city, Lafayette. The day before Katrina reached land, my…
  • Is Elizabeth Warren Just an Ordinary Politician?

    Paul Waldman
    29 Aug 2014 | 7:09 am
    Hero-worship is always risky in politics, because if you put all your hopes on one politician, eventually you're sure to be disappointed. And so it has come that Elizabeth Warren, who inspires more dewy-eyed infatuation than any other current Democratic officeholder, may have given her liberal admirers a reason to feel dismayed. This article from the Cape Cod Times is a week old, but it's just now making the rounds, and it shows that on one subject, Warren isn't quite the same strong progressive some might hope her to be. Here's what happened when a constituent criticized her vote to send an…
  • Still Nader After All These Years

    Robert Kuttner
    29 Aug 2014 | 6:48 am
    (AP Photo/George Ruhe, File) In this April 27, 2008, file photo, Ralph Nader speaks to supporters as he campaigns for his 2008 independent presidential bid in Waterbury, Connecticut. For many Democrats who came of age after 2000, Ralph Nader is a crank who cost Al Gore the presidency. But Nader deserves a more honored place in the progressive pantheon. Over the years, Nader has understood the stranglehold of corporate power on democracy as well as anyone, and throughout his career he has creatively organized counterweights. In the heyday of postwar reform, the 1960s and 1970s, Nader-inspired…
  • The Snake in the Market Basket: Can the Company Recover From Employee Revolt Without Loading Up With Debt?

    Robert Kuttner
    28 Aug 2014 | 7:48 am
    (AP Photo) Market Basket assistant managers Mike Forsyth, left, and John Surprenant, second from left, hold signs while posing with employees in Haverhill, Mass., Thursday, July 24, 2014, in a show of support for "Artie T." Arthur T. Demoulas, the chief executive of the Market Basket supermarket chain whose ouster has led to employee protests, customer boycotts and empty shelves. Aurthur T. Demoulas has since been restored as the CEO. Wednesday night, the long-running Market Basket drama ended and the good guys ostensibly won. Or did they? When we last tuned in, the employees of the $4…
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    Nieman Lab

  • This Week in Review: The danger of freelance foreign journalism, and Facebook goes after clickbait

    Mark Coddington
    29 Aug 2014 | 8:48 am
    This week’s essential reads: The key pieces this week are The New York Times’ Nick Bilton on the shortcomings of Twitter and livestreams in news about Ferguson, and The Awl’s John Herrman on Facebook’s changes and how we define clickbait. Freelancing, foreign correspondence, and risk: The Islamic militant group ISIS’s video depicting the murder of American journalist James Foley, released last week, has prompted an examination of the little-discussed issue of journalist kidnappings. Foley’s family released a letter he sent them — by having a fellow…
  • If BuzzFeed is a tech company, sure, I suppose GE can be a media company

    Joshua Benton
    28 Aug 2014 | 7:19 am
    RELATED ARTICLEGE wants to be where you go for news each morningJune 26, 2014RELATED ARTICLEBranded and owned by GE, run by Atlantic Media Strategies, Ideas Lab is a test for brand journalismSeptember 25, 2013There may be no greater sign of the topsy-turvy nature of today’s media world than this: BuzzFeed thinks of itself as a tech company. GE thinks of itself as a media company. The BuzzFeed business is old news by now, and GE has been doing things that look media-like for some time. (Not even counting NBC.) But there’s more detail about the company’s self-image in this…
  • When it comes to chasing clicks, journalists say one thing but feel pressure to do another

    Angèle Christin
    28 Aug 2014 | 7:04 am
    Online media is made of clicks. Readers click from one article to the next. Advertising revenue is based on the number of unique visitors for each site. Editors always keep in mind their traffic targets to secure the survival of their publications. Writers and bloggers interpret clicks as a signal of popularity. The economic realities underpinning the click-based web are well documented. Yet much work remains to be done on the cultural consequences of the growing importance of Internet metrics. I conducted two years of ethnographic research (observing newsrooms and interviewing journalists,…
  • Here’s more pessimism for print advertising

    Joshua Benton
    27 Aug 2014 | 8:16 am
    Nathalie Tadena in The Wall Street Journal: Magna Global cut its forecast for U.S. advertising revenue growth this year to 5.1% from 6% on Tuesday, because ad spending the first half of the year was weaker than expected. But the Interpublic-owned media buying and research firm expects the ad market to bounce back in the second half of the year, and see its strongest growth rate in a decade in 2015. On a normalized basis, television revenues are expected to grow 2.2% this year. Newspaper and magazine ad revenue are expected to decline 8.9% and 11% respectively, while digital ad revenues are…
  • A new report looks for lessons in successful (and unsuccessful) Knight News Challenge winners

    Justin Ellis
    27 Aug 2014 | 8:01 am
    What makes a media innovation project succeed? That’s the question the Knight Foundation has been asking about perhaps the most prominent program supporting media innovation, the Knight News Challenge. Since 2007, the competition has attracted thousands of people with ideas for an innovation project, and Knight has funded more than a hundred of them. Some have grown into successful, widely used tools; others have disappeared with barely a trace. Knight is out with a new report today that looks at the successes and failures of two cycles of the News Challenge, and what lessons might be…
 
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    Common Sense Journalism

  • FOIA: PACER, federal courts' records site, deleting old records

    31 Aug 2014 | 8:55 am
    Such are the perils of the digital age and our collective memory. The one thing that should be available for a very long time, the nation's court records, are now being deleted in some jurisdictions from the federal courts' PACER database.(We can have a long discussion later about whether court records delivered digitally should be charged the usurious price of 8 cents a page.)Together with efforts to broaden expungement of criminal records in some states, I fear we every so steadily are being overtaken by the philosophy of presentism, a dangerous thing.
  • SC FOIA: Score one for us

    28 Aug 2014 | 11:27 am
    After the recent freedom of information setbacks in South Carolina, media lawyer Jay Bender points out a new state Supreme Court ruling that puts some teeth into the law's 15-day rule and gives us a tool to at least force agencies to make a quick determination on whether records are open.The records still do not have to be produced within 15 days, but by requiring a final determination, it opens the route to be able to quickly move to the courts to adjudicate any adverse agency opinions that records are not open. (And it opens the possibility of attorney's fees.)But then, sigh, there's this…
  • Impressive work by Charleston Post and Courier

    21 Aug 2014 | 5:16 am
    The Post and Courier in Charleston has started running an investigation into domestic violence against women in South Carolina.It's nice work , and you should read it.My only reservation is technical -- the paper has tended to "snowfall" this a bit, and I'm not sure it is the best technique for a public policy story like this. The legislative part of it tends to get lost toward the bottom, and it also kind of gets in the way of a more general thread of telling women's stories, which works better integrally as a long-form narrative.That the Legislature so far has resisted most changes  is…
  • FOIA: Call for grassroots effort in SC

    21 Aug 2014 | 5:04 am
    Don Kausler, regional editor of the Morning News in Florence, has taken up the call that changing SC's wounded Freedom of Information Act has got to be a full-time, concerted effort in which we get the public involved, not just a one-of Sunshine Week effort.
  • RIP: Dan Lynch

    19 Aug 2014 | 6:13 am
    Sad news from Fort Wayne that former Journal Gazette editorial cartoonist Dan Lynch has died.Dan was on staff when I got there and was genuinely a fun guy to work with. He trundled off to Kansas City for a stint and Steve Sack, now in Minneapolis, took his spot for a bit.But Dan returned to the Fort Wayne fold, poking fun at the city and its pols (which is kind of like shooting fish in a barrel), until a stroke sidelined him in 2001. I always liked his clean and to the point style.  I hope I still have in my files a couple of Dan's drawings that he graciously shared. Dan and his work…
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    Pacific Standard

  • Coming Soon: That Whosoever Believeth Shall Not Suffer Depression, Schizophrenia, Homosexuality, Bipolar Disorder, or Autism

    Footnotes
    1 Sep 2014 | 3:02 am
    The Full Story The Rise of Biblical Counseling // Available Online Tuesday, September 02 Over the past few decades, millions of Christians in America have turned away from conventional psychology and psychiatry—and toward biblical counseling. These Christians believe that all remedies, even for severe problems such as bipolar disorder or schizophrenia, are best treated with counseling based on the Bible alone. Under this approach, medication and secular therapy are eschewed in favor of self-examination, repentance, and prayer. When biblical counseling began in the 1960s, it was a reaction…
  • The Hidden Costs of Tobacco Debt

    Cezary Podkul
    29 Aug 2014 | 4:00 pm
    We recently wrote about the hidden cost of tobacco bonds—debts issued by states and other governments in the years following a historic 1998 legal settlement with Big Tobacco. That settlement required tobacco companies to pay billions in perpetuity to reimburse states for the health care costs of smoking. Rather than wait and collect over time, many states used tobacco bonds to get their money in a lump sum, kind of like cashing in lottery winnings for a one-time payment. But in doing so, some issued what are called capital appreciation bonds, or CABs. These special securities are costlier…
  • Why Don’t Men and Women Wear the Same Gender-Neutral Bathing Suits?

    Lisa Wade
    29 Aug 2014 | 2:00 pm
    I came across this advertisement for bathing suits from the 1920s and was struck by how similar the men’s and women’s suits were designed. Hers might have some extra coverage up top and feature a tight skirt over shorts instead of just shorts but, compared to what you see on beaches today, they are essentially the same bathing suit. So why are the designs for men’s and women’s bathing suits so different today? Honestly, either one could be gender-neutral. Male swimmers already wear Speedos; the fact that the man in the ad above is covering his chest is evidence that there is a…
  • Your Brain Decides Whether to Trust Someone in Milliseconds

    Avital Andrews
    29 Aug 2014 | 11:48 am
    Say you’re in the supermarket parking lot holding your infant, bags of groceries, and fumbling to open your car. A stranger walks up and says, “Here, let me hold your baby.” Should you let him? According to a new New York University study, knowing whether or not to trust someone is so critically important that we can tell whether a face is trustworthy before we even consciously know it’s there. The NYU researchers knew from previous studies that people are fairly similar when it comes to how they judge a face’s trustworthiness. They wanted to find out whether that would…
  • True Darwinism Is All About Chance

    Noah Berlatsky
    29 Aug 2014 | 10:00 am
    Chance is an uncomfortable thing. So Curtis Johnson argues in Darwin’s Dice: The Idea of Chance in the Thought of Charles Darwin, and he makes a compelling case. The central controversy, and the central innovation, in Darwin’s work is not the theory of natural selection itself, according to Johnson, but Darwin’s more basic, and more innovative, turn to randomness as a way to explain natural phenomena. This application of randomness was so controversial, Johnson argues, that Darwin tried to cover it up, replacing words like “accident” and “chance”…
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    ProPublica: Articles and Investigations

  • California Legislature Passes Bill to Protect Temp Workers

    ProPublica
    29 Aug 2014 | 12:50 pm
    by Michael Grabell The California legislature has passed a bill that would hold companies legally responsible if the temp agencies and subcontractors they hire cheat workers out of their wages or put them in harm's way. Labor officials across the country have increasingly expressed concern about the rapid growth of the temporary staffing industry since the recession. They have also noted the push by hotels and warehouses to subcontract work that is part of their core business, such as cleaning guest rooms and unloading trucks. Assembly Bill 1897, passed Thursday night, was inspired in part by…
  • Louisiana Coroner Concludes Handcuffed Suspect Killed Himself and More in #MuckReads Weekly

    ProPublica
    29 Aug 2014 | 12:00 pm
    by Amanda Zamora “You can’t make me understand how my son took his left hand, when he was handcuffed behind the back, and shot himself.” A new coroner’s report on the death of a man who died in police custody contradicts the official police report, but still supports the Louisiana State Police’s assertion that the man shot himself to death while handcuffed in the back of a police cruiser. — NBC News via @lriordanseville A Chinese national walked into a U.S. intelligence facility ... No joke. The computer engineer, Lizhong Fan, spent 5 months at “one…
  • One Drug. Two Prices. A Reporter Struggles to Find Out the Cost of His Son’s Prescription

    ProPublica
    29 Aug 2014 | 4:59 am
    by Charles Ornstein This story was co-published with the New York Times' The Upshot. It is not subject to our Creative Commons license. It's not easy being an educated health care consumer. I was reminded of this when I went to refill a prescription this month for an asthma and allergy medication for my 9-month-old son, Holden. The first time I filled his prescription for Montelukast granules — the generic version of Singulair from Merck — my insurance co-payment was $15. A month later, the co-payment had risen to $30 (and my insurance was paying $85.94, rather than $118.53). Why?
  • More Data to Be Withheld from Database of Physician Payments

    ProPublica
    28 Aug 2014 | 1:16 pm
    by Charles Ornstein A new problem has emerged with the federal government's Open Payments system, which is supposed to go live Sept. 30 and disclose payments to physicians by pharmaceutical and medical device companies. A couple weeks ago, the U.S. Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services said it would be withholding information on one-third of the payments, citing data inconsistencies in company submissions. Now, a source familiar with the matter tells ProPublica that CMS won't disclose another batch of payments: research grants made by pharmaceutical companies to doctors through…
  • Discussion: Louisiana’s Disappearing Coast

    ProPublica
    28 Aug 2014 | 9:00 am
    by Scott Klein Scientists say one of the greatest environmental and economic disasters in the nation’s history — the rapid land loss occurring in Southeast Louisiana — is rushing toward a catastrophic conclusion over the next 50 years. On Thursday, The Lens and ProPublica launched "Losing Ground," an interactive project that lets you explore the issues, including why it's happening and what we'll all lose if we do nothing to stop it.  Reporters Bob Marshall (@BobMTheLensNola) from The Lens and Al Shaw (@a_l) from ProPublica discussed how they…
 
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    Reporting on Health

  • Slap: Last ditch attempt by hospital to stop story feels like intimidation

    William Heisel
    29 Aug 2014 | 4:00 am
    As The Boston Globe readied a new three-part series for publication, a regional hospital chain tried suing a newspaper and a patient after it was prevented from disclosing a mentally ill patient's records. The suit was part of a series of serious miscalculations on the hospital's part.
  • A long view suggests kids end up where they start

    RyanWhite
    28 Aug 2014 | 4:00 am
    Baltimore researchers spent three decades tracking nearly 800 kids from poor and middle-class backgrounds. They found little social mobility, with poor kids tending to become poor adults. The findings have sobering implications for health, which is tightly linked to socioeconomic status.
  • Small health plans add choices to state exchange, with mixed results

    judysilber
    28 Aug 2014 | 4:00 am
    In addition to the big insurers, California's state health exchange includes a handful of smaller, region-specific plans. While some have found more early success than others, collectively these plans offer consumers choice and, in some cases, more affordable options.
  • Health Media Jobs and Opportunities: Latino USA is accepting applicants for two-year California fellowships

    alromano
    28 Aug 2014 | 12:00 am
    Those interested in current health issues in California, including the implementation of the Affordable Care Act, should check out Latino USA's fellowship program requirements and apply. The Deseret News in Salt Lake City and Cincinnati.com are also hiring.
  • Bed Count: Do hospital closures hit poor communities harder?

    William Heisel
    27 Aug 2014 | 4:00 am
    When a hospital closes in a low-income area, reporters often assume that the care was essential for the poor communities it was serving. But there are several problems with that assumption, including the equation that health equals health care.
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    MilitaryReporter.net

  • Register today for 2014 MRE Conference

    Isaac Cubillos
    26 Aug 2014 | 5:00 am
    The Pentagon’s new ethics adviser, Rear Adm. Margaret DeLuca “Peg” Klein, will give the keynote address at the 2014 Military Reporters & Editors Conference to be held Friday, Oct. 3, 2014 at The Army Navy Club, in downtown Washington, D.C. Klein was named special adviser to the Secretary of Defense for military professionalism, earlier this […]
  • War reporter accused of plagiarism

    Isaac Cubillos
    16 Jun 2014 | 5:09 am
    Christopher Hedges, author of several books and articles, covering war has been accused of plagiarism. An article in the New Republic outlines Hedges’s plagiarism in an article he submitted to Harper’s Magazine which was rejected. The New Republic’s article also points to plagiarism in Hedges’s book on the psychological effects of combat “War Is a […]
  • Daughter of famous WWII paratrooper completes story of D-Day

    Isaac Cubillos
    24 May 2014 | 7:53 am
    As a young boy, I lived in an area where I was surrounded by veterans of World War II. At the time, I got to hear their “war stories.” Sometimes, they reminded me of the old B-movies with the John Wayne-like hero charging onto the beaches. Navy Cmdr. “Happy” Blake would recall his story of […]
  • ‘Saving South Sudan’ an intelligent summary of what makes the country tick

    Stephanie Chenault
    13 May 2014 | 9:46 am
    Violence and bloodshed can never have morally good results – The Tragedy of Julius Caesar, William Shakespeare “Saving South Sudan” is an ambitious, multimedia event from “World’s Most Dangerous Places,” author Robert Young Pelton and master photographer/filmmaker, Tim Freccia. VICE went big on Pelton’s quixotic journey with Nuer Lost Boy Machot Lap Thiep to “fix” […]
  • Army veteran helps other veterans with writing

    Isaac Cubillos
    26 Feb 2014 | 8:26 am
    By Amaani Lyle American Forces Press Service WILLIAMSBURG, Va., Feb. 25, 2014 – A soldier-turned-scribe conducted a writing workshop at the College of William and Mary here Feb. 22-23, the latest in an ongoing, no-cost series of seminars and workshops for veterans, active and reserve service members, and military family members. The seminars are part […]
 
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    SixEstate

  • ‘Journopreneurs,’ Native Advertising, and Brand Journalism

    Katie McCaskey
    7 Aug 2014 | 4:00 am
    Native advertising? Shouldn’t there be a more politically correct term for it? As a John Oliver fan (see: net neutrality), I was pleased to discover he recently covered “native advertising.” I favor Oliver’s researched comedy and was eager to see his take on it. In his sketch, “native content” refers to both overt product placement and less transparent sponsored material. Or, in a phrase, “corporate influence.” As Jason Abbruzzese summarizes: “Many critics argue, as Oliver does, that at best native advertising is a form of trickery and at…
  • A Social Media Toolkit

    George Williams
    4 Aug 2014 | 4:00 am
    These days there are so many different platforms — blogs, Twitter, Facebook, etc. — that managing them all without assistance can be massively cumbersome. Today I’m going to take a look at some of the key tools that can help you administer your online communications campaign. BuzzSumo – This dandy little tool lets you look at the most shared links on various social networks as well as the influencers for specific topics on those platforms. It covers Google+ shares, Facebook likes, LinkedIn shares, and Twitter shares. It’s available at everyone’s favorite…
  • Brand Journalism: Not the Worst Job in America

    Katie McCaskey
    30 Jul 2014 | 4:00 am
    If you had a choice: would you rather work as a lumberjack or as enlisted military personnel? These two occupations sandwich the occupation of “newspaper reporter,” which a 2014 survey declared “Now Only Second Worst Job in America!” Reporters got the short end of the ranking stick because, as Tina Nguyen summarizes, they make “on average, $37,090 a year, and also report absurdly high levels of stress, terrible work environments, and poor hiring outlooks.” So what’s a journalist to do? One option is to buy access to a guide to tell you all about…
  • Social Media Screening: Beware the Pitfalls!

    George Williams
    28 Jul 2014 | 4:00 am
      (Please note that none of this constitutes legal advice. This article is meant to delineate some best practices you can observe, but it is always worthwhile to seek legal counsel to ascertain the particulars of your local laws.) Screening Potential Employees If you’re reading this, chances are that you either already use social media for business or are considering doing so. I often write about social media’s use in the promotional arena, but today we are going to take a look at another important facet of using social media in business: screening new employees. Now it…
  • No One Wants to Hear Your Sales Pitch

    George Williams
    21 Jul 2014 | 4:00 am
    Welcome to 2014, a year when the audience is media-savvy and the pace is faster than Speedy Gonzales’. For anyone with a product or message, the potential reach provided by the Internet is like a dangling carrot. The promise of quickly reaching millions is irresistible, which accounts for the deluge of marketing that comes with every online experience. Ad Saturation Do you use Gmail? Then you see ads every time you check your mail. Do you read blogs? Many of them, from large to small, have ads served into the body of their posts, the sidebar, or both. Pop-ups, banner ads, sponsored…
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    Joe Gullo

  • The Champlain Valley Fair in Photos

    Joe Gullo
    31 Aug 2014 | 1:37 pm
    Here are some photos from the Champlain Valley Fair in Essex Junction, Vt.:   Believe it or not, this was sculpted out of sand.  This leopard turned one at the beginning of the fair.  Cows laying down in the cow barn. Some of the cows were being shaved. Rubber ducks swimming around.  Shot of one of the two ferris wheels at the Champlain Valley Fair.  We can’t forget about the sheep! Some rides and games at the Champlain Valley Fair. Another look at the sand sculpture.  Vermont’s largest pumpkin – weighing 10,675 pounds. All photographs were taken by Joe Gullo. (C)…
  • Common Core Standards By State

    Joe Gullo
    31 Aug 2014 | 10:15 am
    Common Core standards is a controversial topic for many parents. Common Core is a collaborative effort by states to set of standards in English language arts/literacy and mathematics. This, according to the U.S. Department of Education, will help students become ready for college and the workforce. According to Core Standards, 43 states and the District of Columbia have adopted Common Core State Standards (CCSS). Hoover over a state below to see when that state adopted standards and click to see the state’s Common Core standards. States in orange have not adopted standards, states in…
  • Facebook’s New Click-Baiting Rules Spell Big Problems Down the Road

    Joe Gullo
    28 Aug 2014 | 4:03 pm
    Publishers and page owners beware. Facebook’s new click-baiting rules spell big problems down the road. One way Facebook is determining that a page is “click-baiting” is based on how many people click and whether or not they click the link, but return a short time later. There could be a number of factors that contribute to an individual from clicking on a link and then going back to Facebook. It could possibly be a slow internet connection, the user added the website to a bookmarking website, or we truly not interested in what the page had to say. Get ready for the exodus…
  • My First Hyperlapse Video

    Joe Gullo
    27 Aug 2014 | 9:34 pm
    I decided to take the plunge and experiment with Instagram’s Hyperlapse app. The video is morning traffic in the Burlington, Vt. area. Instagram released the app into the Apple App Store on Tuesday. The post My First Hyperlapse Video appeared first on Joe Gullo.
  • Instagram’s Hyperlapse App to Capture Timelapses

    Joe Gullo
    27 Aug 2014 | 6:16 am
    If you ever wanted to create a timelapse of your morning commute, kid’s sports games, or your vacation, now you can with Instagram’s Hyperlapse app. Instagram says users do not need to create an account to create a hyperlapse. When the app opens, users will go straight to the camera. Once you’re done recording the video, it will save to your camera. From there, you can share it on Instagram and other social networks. Hyperlapse is only available for iOS devices. Download the app from the Apple’s App Store. The post Instagram’s Hyperlapse App to Capture Timelapses…
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    The Hungry and Foolish

  • ☆ Predictions on Touch ID

    Kevin Wild
    1 Sep 2014 | 10:21 am
    As we draw near Apple's September 9th conference, it's time for me to make some predictions on what I think will be announced.In Part 2 of my multi-part prediction, I will focus on the changes coming to Touch ID. Disclaimer: while I have evidence to prove some of my predictions, these are in no way guarantees and should not be treated as such.Touch ID SoarsIf my predictions for the upcoming iPhones are correct, Touch ID will be included on all new models. This will be important when Touch ID functionality expands with iOS 8.3rd-Party SupportI'll start with what we know for sure:…
  • ☆ Predictions on New iPhones

    Kevin Wild
    31 Aug 2014 | 9:37 am
    As we draw near Apple's September 9th conference, it's time for me to make some predictions on what I think will be announced.In Part 1 of my multi-part prediction, I will focus on the changes coming to the iPhone lineup. Disclaimer: while I have evidence to prove some of my predictions, these are in no way guarantees and should not be treated as such.New iPhonesI expect Apple to introduce three new iPhones: iPhone 6cThe first will be an update to the 5c which will see the addition of a Touch ID sensor and an updated camera (same one found in the current 5s). I expect the 'iPhone…
  • Apple Plans to Unveil Wearable in September

    Kevin Wild
    30 Aug 2014 | 7:11 am
    Apple now plans to unveil a new wearable alongside the two next-generation iPhones we told you the company will debut on September 9. The new device will, predictably, make good use of Apple’s HealthKit health and fitness platform.Don't get too excited, you won't be able to wear one until next year.Permalink
  • 1Password App Extension for iOS 8

    Kevin Wild
    25 Aug 2014 | 4:34 am
    The 1Password app extension will allow you to:Access their 1Password Logins to automatically fill your login page.Use the Strong Password Generator to create unique passwords during registration, and save the new Login within 1Password.Quickly fill 1Password Logins directly into web views.I personally can't wait to see what the other developers come up with in iOS 8.Permalink
  • Conjecture Regarding Larger iPhone Displays

    Kevin Wild
    24 Aug 2014 | 5:50 am
    Solid research from Gruber:At this point, there’s too much smoke around the “two new iPhones, one at 4.7 inches and the other 5.5 inches” narrative for there not to be a fire. I think that’s what Apple is planning to announce next month — not because anyone “familiar with the plans” has told me so, but simply because so many parts have leaked corroborating these two sizes.The question is: if the 5.5 inch version comes significantly later than the 4.7 inch version, how many people will be willing to wait?Permalink
 
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